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HerlockSholmes

R.I.P........ (Holmes-related)

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Hi Carol/Arcadia

 

I don’t know if there’s already a thread for Sherlock Holmes related R.I.P’s so please feel free to move this post. As there’s similar thread on the ripper forums (for authors/researchers etc who have died) I thought it might be an idea for one here?

 

I wanted to start it off with an R.I.P for the English actor Keith Barron who died today aged 83. He was an actor that will be less well known outside of the UK as, although he did film work, he was mainly known as a tv actor.

I’ll remember him as Bob Ferguson in the Grenada Holmes episode The Last Vampyre (based on the story The Sussex Vampire.)

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This thread is a good idea, Herlock -- thanks for starting it.  I have moved it to the Sherlock Holmes Discussion area, and pinned it so people will be able to find it more easily.

 

I've seen The Last Vampyre, so I've seen at least a bit of Mr. Barron's work.  I recall his character only vaguely, but it was a large role and the Granada series was uniformly well done, so he was clearly an accomplished professional.

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Sorry I haven't been around much lately, (family matters) but I agree with Carol ... good idea. Although I hope we don't have too many recent additions.... :wacko:

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Thanks Arcadia.

 

I too hope that this thread isn’t very active

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How awful.  Very sad for his family.  You'd think the job of camera operator wouldn't have to be fatal, or carry with it the high risk of injury and/or death, like, I don't know . . .infantry soldier or correspondent in a war zone.  Filming pretend stories for entertainment shouldn't have such grave outcomes.

 

This photo captured a lighter moment in Mark's life.  He looks to be 'on duty' behind the camera, so when Martin Freeman smirks like that in his colleague's direction, is that Dr. Watson smirking at Sherlock or is that Martin preparing to make a crack to Benedict?  Our diminutive Doctor is a live wire in person.  No double-barreled bird flips in this shot, however.  Note the very Hobbit-y ensemble of green trousers and waistcoat.

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Lovely photo, terrible news.  :(

 

Added:  Mark Milsome was camera operator for seven episodes of Sherlock, from Blind Banker through Sign of Three.

 

(Alex and I may have seen him at work on the North Gower shoot for Sign.  I would check our photos, but have had no way of sharing them since PhotoBucket changed the rules.)

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Thanks. I'm a bit leery after the PB incident, but I believe I even have a Tinypic account (some forum where I wanted to post actually required I use that site for my avatar). I'm certainly in no rush to port over all the pictures that I've already posted here (to Tinypic or anywhere else) -- once burnt, twice shy -- but I may try that for future postings.

 

Added later:  Nix on Tinypic -- I found out it's owned and operated by PhotoBucket!

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R.I.P actor Peter Wyngarde who died today aged 90. He was most famous for playing Jason King in the late 60’s early 70’s. I remember watching him as a child and then pretending to be him

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R.I.P actor Peter Wyngarde who died today aged 90. He was most famous for playing Jason King in the late 60’s early 70’s. I remember watching him as a child and then pretending to be him

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There’s definitely a touch of Wilde in Langdale Pike I’ve always felt. You will have no doubt heard this before and so I apologising for the repetition. After he had written A Study In Scarlet (for which he received the princely sum of £25) he was invited to a lunch at The Langham hotel by Joseph Stoddart who was Managing Editor Of Lippincotts magazine. He commissioned Doyle and one of his other guests to write a novel. Doyle wrote A Sign Of Four and his other guest, Oscar Wilde, wrote The Picture Of Dorian Gray. (Years later, The Sherlock Holmes Society Of London had a plaque put up at Langhams to commemorate the meeting.

 

The Langham:

 

https://www.google.co.uk/search?rlz=1C9BKJA_enGB704GB704&hl=en-GB&biw=1024&bih=1251&tbm=isch&sa=1&ei=M-1hWv7yJIyjwAKa56CQDQ&q=inside+langhams+holmes&oq=inside+langhams+holmes&gs_l=mobile-gws-img.12..30i10k1.35601.44176.0.46061.24.22.1.1.1.0.177.1755.19j2.21.0....0...1c.1.64.mobile-gws-img..1.19.1586.3..0j35i39k1j0i67k1j0i8i30k1.157.uaqqMLOeFNk#imgrc=zt6XPTfpgb7utM:

 

Not bad eh?

 

This is the plaque:

 

https://www.google.co.uk/search?rlz=1C9BKJA_enGB704GB704&hl=en-GB&biw=1024&bih=1251&tbm=isch&sa=1&ei=M-1hWv7yJIyjwAKa56CQDQ&q=inside+langhams+holmes&oq=inside+langhams+holmes&gs_l=mobile-gws-img.12..30i10k1.35601.44176.0.46061.24.22.1.1.1.0.177.1755.19j2.21.0....0...1c.1.64.mobile-gws-img..1.19.1586.3..0j35i39k1j0i67k1j0i8i30k1.157.uaqqMLOeFNk#imgrc=o-PvghCF62S2gM:

 

Surprisingly Doyle and Wilde got on famously. Doyle was the archetypal bluff, manly Englishman of the time. Traditionally conservative in his views I can only suspect that he wouldn’t have been so keen on him if he’d have been aware of his, shall we say, tendencies?

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I really should check my posts before clicking ‘post.’ Of course I meant ‘apologise’ rather than ‘apologising.’ And I’m the one nitpicking American Holmes authors for minor slips

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There’s definitely a touch of Wilde in Langdale Pike I’ve always felt. You will have no doubt heard this before and so I apologising for the repetition. After he had written A Study In Scarlet (for which he received the princely sum of £25) he was invited to a lunch at The Langham hotel by Joseph Stoddart who was Managing Editor Of Lippincotts magazine. He commissioned Doyle and one of his other guests to write a novel. Doyle wrote A Sign Of Four and his other guest, Oscar Wilde, wrote The Picture Of Dorian Gray. (Years later, The Sherlock Holmes Society Of London had a plaque put up at Langhams to commemorate the meeting.

 

The Langham:

 

https://www.google.co.uk/search?rlz=1C9BKJA_enGB704GB704&hl=en-GB&biw=1024&bih=1251&tbm=isch&sa=1&ei=M-1hWv7yJIyjwAKa56CQDQ&q=inside+langhams+holmes&oq=inside+langhams+holmes&gs_l=mobile-gws-img.12..30i10k1.35601.44176.0.46061.24.22.1.1.1.0.177.1755.19j2.21.0....0...1c.1.64.mobile-gws-img..1.19.1586.3..0j35i39k1j0i67k1j0i8i30k1.157.uaqqMLOeFNk#imgrc=zt6XPTfpgb7utM:

 

Not bad eh?

 

This is the plaque:

 

https://www.google.co.uk/search?rlz=1C9BKJA_enGB704GB704&hl=en-GB&biw=1024&bih=1251&tbm=isch&sa=1&ei=M-1hWv7yJIyjwAKa56CQDQ&q=inside+langhams+holmes&oq=inside+langhams+holmes&gs_l=mobile-gws-img.12..30i10k1.35601.44176.0.46061.24.22.1.1.1.0.177.1755.19j2.21.0....0...1c.1.64.mobile-gws-img..1.19.1586.3..0j35i39k1j0i67k1j0i8i30k1.157.uaqqMLOeFNk#imgrc=o-PvghCF62S2gM:

 

Surprisingly Doyle and Wilde got on famously. Doyle was the archetypal bluff, manly Englishman of the time. Traditionally conservative in his views I can only suspect that he wouldn’t have been so keen on him if he’d have been aware of his, shall we say, tendencies?

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Gales Brandreth has written a series of books (six I think) where Wilde teams up with Doyle to solve crime. They’ve been very well reviewed. I have one myself somewhere but haven’t read it yet (another one on the list.)

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Gales Brandreth has written a series of books (six I think) where Wilde teams up with Doyle to solve crime. They’ve been very well reviewed. I have one myself somewhere but haven’t read it yet (another one on the list.)

 

What an Odd Couple that would be!

 

One supposes that crime solving might require more physical exertion/activity than would have suited the languid Mr. Wilde, whose idea of exercise was confined to the boudoir?  Just guessing here, but I wouldn't have supposed running around the streets in search of clues would have appealed to Wilde's aesthetic side. 

 

It was truly a sad ending for such a brilliant mind.

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There’s definitely a touch of Wilde in Langdale Pike I’ve always felt. You will have no doubt heard this before and so I apologising for the repetition. After he had written A Study In Scarlet (for which he received the princely sum of £25) he was invited to a lunch at The Langham hotel by Joseph Stoddart who was Managing Editor Of Lippincotts magazine. He commissioned Doyle and one of his other guests to write a novel. Doyle wrote A Sign Of Four and his other guest, Oscar Wilde, wrote The Picture Of Dorian Gray. (Years later, The Sherlock Holmes Society Of London had a plaque put up at Langhams to commemorate the meeting.

 

The Langham:

 

https://www.google.co.uk/search?rlz=1C9BKJA_enGB704GB704&hl=en-GB&biw=1024&bih=1251&tbm=isch&sa=1&ei=M-1hWv7yJIyjwAKa56CQDQ&q=inside+langhams+holmes&oq=inside+langhams+holmes&gs_l=mobile-gws-img.12..30i10k1.35601.44176.0.46061.24.22.1.1.1.0.177.1755.19j2.21.0....0...1c.1.64.mobile-gws-img..1.19.1586.3..0j35i39k1j0i67k1j0i8i30k1.157.uaqqMLOeFNk#imgrc=zt6XPTfpgb7utM:

 

Not bad eh?

 

This is the plaque:

 

https://www.google.co.uk/search?rlz=1C9BKJA_enGB704GB704&hl=en-GB&biw=1024&bih=1251&tbm=isch&sa=1&ei=M-1hWv7yJIyjwAKa56CQDQ&q=inside+langhams+holmes&oq=inside+langhams+holmes&gs_l=mobile-gws-img.12..30i10k1.35601.44176.0.46061.24.22.1.1.1.0.177.1755.19j2.21.0....0...1c.1.64.mobile-gws-img..1.19.1586.3..0j35i39k1j0i67k1j0i8i30k1.157.uaqqMLOeFNk#imgrc=o-PvghCF62S2gM:

 

Surprisingly Doyle and Wilde got on famously. Doyle was the archetypal bluff, manly Englishman of the time. Traditionally conservative in his views I can only suspect that he wouldn’t have been so keen on him if he’d have been aware of his, shall we say, tendencies?

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I have the Matthias Boston book and it’s superb. One of the best ever. I’d been meaning to get it for a while but I saw it London at a book shop just down the road from St Mary-le-Bow church ( Bow Bells are the ones that if you were born within the sound of them you were a true cockney.) I think that it was originally priced at £30 but was on sale for £20 so I snapped it up. It goes from a Doyle bio and through his creation and writing of Holmes and ends up with movie, radio and tv representations.

 

I’ve just noticed the title difference. My book is called The Life And Death Of Sherlock Holmes. I’m pretty sure it’s just the UK publisher name for the same book though. There’s a few on sale on eBay. The cheapest is £12.83 free p+p. I’d recommend it to anyone

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Gales Brandreth has written a series of books (six I think) where Wilde teams up with Doyle to solve crime. They’ve been very well reviewed. I have one myself somewhere but haven’t read it yet (another one on the list.)

What an Odd Couple that would be!

 

One supposes that crime solving might require more physical exertion/activity than would have suited the languid Mr. Wilde, whose idea of exercise was confined to the boudoir? Just guessing here, but I wouldn't have supposed running around the streets in search of clues would have appealed to Wilde's aesthetic side.

 

It was truly a sad ending for such a brilliant mind.

Brandreth also recently produced a novel called Jack The Ripper Case Solved. Brandreth is a descendant of journalist George R Sims and he claims to have read his papers and solved the mystery. He hasn’t, but it’s an enjoyable novel again pairing Doyle with Wilde. It’s set in 1894 and the ripper is back! In 1894 the Assistant Chief Constable Of the Metropolitan Police was Sir Melville Macnaghten who, like Wilde, lived in Tite Street London. (I stood outside Wilde’s house this year.) In the novel he asks Wilde to look into the case. Wilde in turn gets Doyle on side. Needless to say the rippers are caught

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Following these links you posted led me to this book (attachment below, if it works). ...

Nope, sorry.  It is saying file too large and I can't find a smaller version.  It's a great cover, though!  The title is 'From Holmes to Sherlock' by Matthias Bostrom.

 

 

Alas, the forum only allows you to attach a very small handful of files. After that, you have to keep your photos on a different site, and link to them from here.

 

Unfortunately, one of the more popular "photo storage" sites, Photobucket, is now charging a high fee for the service. The one I use, Imgur, sometimes can't be seen by other members. Someone else recommended Postimage but I don't know if anyone's checked it out. Sorry I can't give you better information. :(

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Is this the only known footage of Oscar Wilde??

 

https://youtu.be/i-LrYLN6_uM

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I don't think even that's known! Lot of ifs....

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Is this the only known footage of Oscar Wilde??

 

https://youtu.be/i-LrYLN6_uM

 

I have to see Stephen Fry's movie about Oscar Wilde.  I just watched a clip with a very young Jude Law and Michael Sheen.

 

SF was born to play Wilde, that's for sure.

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I don't think even that's known! Lot of ifs....

It’s a definate unknown/maybe Arcadia. He was known to have been there at the time. The figure looks like a big man (as Wilde was) and is the only one in a stand out white suit possibly indicating a flamboyant dresser (as Wilde was.) There’s absolutely no way of knowing. It’s a tantalising thought though. It might be him.

 

It reminds me a little of this photograph. It’s thought to be the only adult photograph of Van Gogh. Unfortunately his back is toward the camera

 

https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=photograph+of+van+gogh&rlz=1C9BKJA_enGB704GB704&hl=en-GB&prmd=isnv&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiM9qHozufYAhVBKVAKHcH1DuMQ_AUIESgB&biw=1024&bih=1251#imgrc=SVwZi7HLvlFeTM:

 

I’m a bit of a saddo when it comes to old photographs. I recall a few years ago reading a biography of The Duke Of Wellington. I’d always believed that there was no photograph of him (only painted portraits and drawings) but I saw in the book a daguerreotype photograph of the Duke in old age. I was amazed. Here it is

 

https://www.google.co.uk/search?rlz=1C9BKJA_enGB704GB704&hl=en-GB&biw=1024&bih=1251&tbm=isch&sa=1&ei=FsZjWoz9HY7YwAKQwqDoDA&q=duke+of+wellington+daguerreotype&oq=wellington+daguer&gs_l=mobile-gws-img.1.0.0i5i30k1.122488.132821.0.135451.19.14.1.4.4.0.107.1125.11j2.13.0....0...1c.1.64.mobile-gws-img..1.18.1304.3..0j35i39k1j0i67k1j0i24k1.114.T4Jg4Bhz0FQ#imgrc=rMh-QFsXjaEFPM:

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Is this the only known footage of Oscar Wilde??

 

I have to see Stephen Fry's movie about Oscar Wilde. I just watched a clip with a very young Jude Law and Michael Sheen.

 

SF was born to play Wilde, that's for sure.

I saw it when it first came out. I must watch it again. I agree though...born to play Wilde but also born to play Jeeves in my opinion.

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