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Carol the Dabbler

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Everything posted by Carol the Dabbler

  1. Really? Taking a mental census of my friends when I was in that age range -- well, many of us weren't even in the same state as our parents, having moved to attend one university or another, and then stayed. Of the local people, I think most did live with their parents at least some of the time, and in some cases that arrangement was clearly for the parents' benefit -- one gal's widowed mother would have been struggling to support herself and a teenage son, had her two adult children not lived with them and shared expenses, and another gal's father was in poor health, so she moved back in with him. So maybe things haven't changed all that much, after all.
  2. Sounds like we're a bit different, then, although my dreams are more like J.P.'s than Caya's, other than me "standing" while she's "swimming."
  3. She may have been feeling starting to feel over the hill at 40. If Japanese actresses are (like American actresses) expected to remain eternally youthful or risk being replaced, then she might have seen her first wrinkle or her first gray hair as the impending end of her career.
  4. That possibility had never occurred to me, but that's a good point. Of course it won't be real mink or ermine or whatever, but it could nevertheless be some sort of cheap real fur dyed to look like something more expensive. As J.P. says, there are ways to tell. I wonder what the outcome would be if you complained to the vendor that their "faux" fur was actually real fur -- in other words, fake faux fur? Would you be taken seriously or laughed out of court, so to speak? I no longer buy fake fur unless it's very clearly fake, and preferably some non-fur color (e.g., pink or blue) as well.
  5. It sounded to me like there were a bunch of other interpretations being proposed, which is why I posted mine (which I agree seems quite clear from context). But maybe what I took to be other interpretations of that bit of dialog were actually interpretations of one aspect of the entire episode (or one aspect of the entire series). Sorry. Didn't mean to confuse anyone. Goodness knows I'm often sufficiently confused for all of us!
  6. I misspoke earlier. I don't think the building is for sale, just the business and the remainder of their lease.
  7. That technique sounds interesting -- and simple -- and your successful experience with it encourages me to give it a try. I may have asked this last time we talked about such dreams -- but when you folks say "flying" in this context, what does it look like? Are you flapping your arms like a bird, or soaring like Superman (or what)? My dreams are like neither of those -- I'm "standing" upright, able to control my altitude with my thoughts. The best analogy I can think of would be how a hot-air balloon must feel, except that I can also consciously control my horizontal movement. Anyhow, that's why I refer to it as levitation. And I don't move very fast, just sort of float along. If I'm already half awake, I can often start controlling a dream, but then it becomes something of a daydream.
  8. True, some of the negative comments I read could have been reactions to that just as easily as to Enola's feminism. I also wonder how many of the negative reviewers had even seen the movie?
  9. The books are Enola's territory, so neither Mycroft nor Sherlock spends much time "on stage." She nevertheless manages to bamboozle them pretty regularly. Doyle's Holmes describes Mycroft as smarter than himself, but since he never acknowledges even the existence of Enola, who knows what he might have said about her relative intelligence?
  10. Of those choices, I'd have to go with the faun ears. In fact, that photo could well be our first view of her face. Odd though, I'd never imagined her with a beard. Or should I say "him"? (His/her profile lists gender as "Not telling.")
  11. Hmm, yeah, kinda. *shudder* Though in Shirley Jackson's story, the violence was one very specific ritual, based on long tradition, whereas in both The Purge and the Star Trek episode, it seems pretty ad lib.
  12. And (in any business that deals with the public) you can't very well tell them to come back at a more convenient time, because -- well, public relations. Who knows if they might soon be in a position to choose your establishment? Come to think of it, I've never held a job where that sort of thing was likely to happen. (I've been a high-school teacher, an office worker, and a software engineer.)
  13. Hold the presses! Just found this on Speedy's Twitter account: Overwhelmed with the memories everyone has of this place, however to confirm, we are not closing... ... @speedyscafe is for sale! Anyone who's interested call Chris.... So they're apparently selling the business as is, not just the building. Added: Actually, I don't think the building is for sale, just the business and the remainder of their current lease.
  14. Grrrr!! Mine's apparently like that. The phone is complaining that it's nearly full, and I've already deleted all of the downloads (hardly any of which I'd ever intended to download; I thought I was just looking at a web page) and that made enough of a difference that it stopped complaining for a week or so, but now it's irked again. So I thought I'll get rid of those stupid apps that I never use -- but the best I can do is deactivate them, which is presumably no help with the space issue. I am thinking of deactivating the news feed, though, mostly because their symbol is the same shape as my text-message alert symbol, which I DO care about. I hope you're right!!! But if they're not fans (and, oddly enough, not everyone in London likes the show) or don't think the fans bring in enough business -- well, legally speaking, whoever leases the space next can do with it more or less as they like. It'll probably still be some sort of restaurant, though, since it's already got the layout. Like "Antonio's" (from Study in Pink) is still a restaurant, just not Italian -- though come to think of it, I'm not sure it ever was Italian; maybe they just faked up the exterior for the show.
  15. Maybe someone already said this and I misunderstood, but my interpretation of this scene: SHERLOCK: It’s not a pleasant thought, John, but I have this terrible feeling, from time to time, that we might all just be human. JOHN: Even you? SHERLOCK: No. Even you. ... is that Sherlock has seen how John has been beating himself up because he had thought about cheating on Mary. So he's pointing out that even though John is basically a good man, nobody's perfect, and that's OK.
  16. That sounds like the original Star Trek episode "Return of the Archons," only they called it "The Festival" and "The Red Hour." The rest of the time, the local folks were pretty boring.
  17. I would guess that many librarians go into that line of work because they're more comfortable with books than with people. But the ones I've encountered have seemed very eager to do anything involving books, including help people find them. So I'd guess that your sadist is an unfortunately exception to that norm. And shame on her, I say! On the other hand, maybe she thought you were simply one of those thoughtless people who come in ten minutes before closing, expecting the staff to drop everything and help them. There certainly are people like that, unfortunately. Maybe she had no idea that, because of the bus schedule, that was the only time you could have arrived. Or, on the other other hand, maybe she really was a sadist.
  18. I think it would make sense to come clean with her. Tell her you've never been comfortable in groups of more than two. (Which is the crux of the matter, isn't it? That's WHY you just don't want to go.) She sounds like a nice person, so she will probably understand. And even if she doesn't completely understand, at least you won't have to keep making up excuses.
  19. I kinda know what you mean, though I've never had layers like that. The first time I read a fantasy novel called The People, the characters' ability to levitate seemed vaguely familiar to me. So I put the book down and closed my eyes and realized that I remembered levitating just like that. I thought oh well, it was just a dream. Then some time later I had a levitating dream again and (in the dream) I thought "See? I told you I could do that!" Part of me is still convinced that I really could levitate if I could remember exactly how to push with my thoughts.
  20. Well, I wasn't going to say anything, in hopes that she'd think no one had noticed. But now that the cat's out of the bag, I will say that in my opinion, the results of her cosmetic surgery were worth neither the expense nor the pain. She apparently intended to look like a French poodle but missed by a mile. Sorry, Arcadia! Come to think of it, though, maybe we just need to wait for the curls on her ears to grow in.
  21. Yes, that'll work! I'm curious about this, though -- could you either post links to a few of those or else post the name of the thread, the person who was posting, and the time and date of the post (from which I'll subtract five hours in order to match what I see)? Thanks!
  22. In general I agree. Of course there are times when that isn't practical. For example, I've been in situations where I desperately needed to rest but didn't want to fall asleep. So I'd lie down and use my phone -- check the forum, check email, look up stuff. Couldn't do that with a laptop (and I didn't have a tablet at the time). It was a big help in dealing with a stressful situation. And maybe some people are simply more comfortable using their phone. Whatever works for them is fine with me. HOWEVER if some perfectly ambulatory person is sitting on the couch doing computer-type stuff on their phone, all the while complaining that it's so much more awkward than it would be on their laptop, which is, as you say, on the other side of the room -- then I'm with you all the way!
  23. Ah! Well, this happens to be another case where there are two methods, which I suppose we could call the keyboard method (presumably the original) and the mouse method. They do roughly the same thing, namely select and highlight a section of text, but there are some differences. On this forum, for example, if you select a block of text in a post by using the mouse method, you'll get a teeny little pop-up "quote" button that you can click on if that's what you want to do -- but last time I checked, that part doesn't work at all if you used the arrow keys.
  24. Thanks for posting those links in your subsequent posts, BBally. I now have a better idea of what people are complaining about. It's mostly NOT that Mycroft is a sexist, it's that Enola is a feminist, which the complainers see as anachronistic. As I mentioned above, I don't like retroactive political correctness. But feminism didn't suddenly happen circa 1970, it's at least a hundred years older than that. In the US territory of Wyoming (which became a state in 1890), women campaigned for and won the right to vote in 1869, and the same was soon true in several other western territories and states, but the nationwide battle continued until 1920, when all US women gained the right to vote. British women of that era were also fighting for the right to vote, and the movie is apparently set in 1900 (though the book takes place some twelve years earlier), smack in the middle of the Women's Suffrage campaign, when women were also beginning to rebel against restrictive clothing and a number of other things. Bloomers date back to about 1850, and women were also starting to reject corsets at that time. So the books, at least, fairly and accurately represent a certain segment of the British female population of that era. Admittedly, the women's rights movement died down quite a lot in the mid-20th century, so it's understandable that a lot of people think feminism started only about 50 years ago. And I haven't yet seen the adaptation, so for all I know it carries things to ridiculous extremes. As soon as I get the opportunity, I'll see for myself.
  25. Maybe he's simply one of those people who find one way of doing something, assume it's the only way available, and don't look any further. Come to think of it, I might be one of those.
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