Jump to content
EvigMidnat

Whats Your Favorite Case?

Recommended Posts

For years I've been wondering about those British double surnames; specifically, how is the order determined?  I just found that there's a Wikipedia page entitled Double-barrelled name, but it doesn't answer my question.  Does anyone here happen to know?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have three favourite stories tied for first place in my mind. They are "The Dancing Men", "The Speckled Band" and "The Final Problem".  Conan Doyle at his very best. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 minutes ago, All Right, Spock said:

I have three favourite stories tied for first place in my mind. They are "The Dancing Men", "The Speckled Band" and "The Final Problem".

Do you have any idea why those three are your favorites?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've read only (I think) three of the books and a few random stories here and there, and my favorite was the Hound. Does that count as a case? :smile: 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Arcadia said:

my favorite was the Hound. Does that count as a case?

Considering that the original poster introduced this thread like so:

On 3/16/2012 at 10:00 AM, EvigMidnat said:

since the BBC released a few of the original cases with intro's from Mark and Steven, I figured this was a good question to start this section.

... I would say yes.  She seems to have meant "case" as shorthand for "short story and/or novel."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have read the entire canon back to back at least 8 times. My favourite novel is "The Hound Of The Baskervilles", because it's one of the only truly scary Holmes stories. It has likeable characters and a compelling plot, and ACD gives the reader enough information that they can figure out who the killer is by themselves. It's a classic. My favourite collection of stories is Memoirs, because of stories like The Musgrave Ritual,  The Reigate Squires, The Crooked Man and The Final Problem, but my favourite story is either The Dancing Men or (ACD's favourite - ) The Speckled Band. That being said, I truly love all sixty of the stories and I can quote whole passages from my favourites because I've listened to the audiobooks so many times. I tend to grit my teeth a little at the overt racism in The Three Gables though. Even though this was socially accepted in Victorian times, the story was published in 1926, which makes it a little harder to forgive. 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello and welcome to the forum! :wave: 

We are honored to have a Holmesian like you with us. :smile: And yes, some stories have aged better than others, to put it politely. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Welcome to the forum, All Right, Spock!  :welcome:

As Caya says, it's nice to add a Holmesian to the membership.  You are by no means the only one here, but I'm probably about average, having read roughly half the canon.

Even though your screen name is a quote from John Watson (in the adaptation of your favorite novel), I'm gonna guess that you're also something of a Star Trek fan.  Or not?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
56 minutes ago, Carol the Dabbler said:

Welcome to the forum, All Right, Spock!  :welcome:

As Caya says, it's nice to add a Holmesian to the membership.  You are by no means the only one here, but I'm probably about average, having read roughly half the canon.

Even though your screen name is a quote from John Watson (in the adaptation of your favorite novel), I'm gonna guess that you're also something of a Star Trek fan.  Or not?

 

I echo the welcome, ARS!  It's so wonderful to welcome another kindred soul.

Isn't it interesting that a fan of one is often a fan of the other?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
57 minutes ago, Pamela said:

I echo the welcome, ARS!

You might not want to use that particular abbreviation, Pamela.  :D

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
42 minutes ago, Carol the Dabbler said:

You might not want to use that particular abbreviation, Pamela.  :D

 

Call me stupid, but I don't get it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Carol the Dabbler said:

You might not want to use that particular abbreviation, Pamela.  :D

 

 

5 hours ago, Pamela said:

Call me stupid, but I don't get it.


Well, you're not British.  But All Right, Spock's initials come very near to spelling a British slang term for the posterior (just add an "e" on the end).  Not a problem, just couldn't resist pointing it out.  ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, Carol the Dabbler said:

Welcome to the forum, All Right, Spock!  :welcome:

As Caya says, it's nice to add a Holmesian to the membership.  You are by no means the only one here, but I'm probably about average, having read roughly half the canon.

Even though your screen name is a quote from John Watson (in the adaptation of your favorite novel), I'm gonna guess that you're also something of a Star Trek fan.  Or not?

 

Yep!! I'm a huge Trekkie. I love this quote because I have always interpreted it as being a reference to Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country, in which Spock says "An ancestor of mine once said that when you have eliminated the impossible what ever remains, however improbable, must be the truth." (or something to that effect)

Canonically, Spock (my favourite TV & film character) and Sherlock Holmes (my favourite literary character) are related. Yay.

Then again, maybe John is just pointing out that Sherlock is taking the whole "no emotions" thing a bit too far and is acting like a psychotic weirdo. Either way it's cool. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Carol the Dabbler said:

You might not want to use that particular abbreviation, Pamela.  :D

 

Yeah.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Carol the Dabbler said:

 


Well, you're not British.  But All Right, Spock's initials come very near to spelling a British slang term for the posterior (just add an "e" on the end).  Not a problem, just couldn't resist pointing it out.  ;)

*Sigh* Right. Whatever.

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, All Right, Spock said:

Yeah.

All right already! I get it!

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, All Right, Spock said:

Yep!! I'm a huge Trekkie. I love this quote because I have always interpreted it as being a reference to Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country, in which Spock says "An ancestor of mine once said that when you have eliminated the impossible what ever remains, however improbable, must be the truth." (or something to that effect)

Canonically, Spock (my favourite TV & film character) and Sherlock Holmes (my favourite literary character) are related. Yay.

Then again, maybe John is just pointing out that Sherlock is taking the whole "no emotions" thing a bit too far and is acting like a psychotic weirdo. Either way it's cool. 

You might like this blog post by Diane Duane then, where she talks about the relationship between Star Trek and Sherlock Holmes: http://dianeduane.com/outofambit/2012/02/02/the-starship-and-the-upstairs-flat/ . :smile:

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My own reaction to hearing John's "Spock" comment was somewhat more real-world-oriented than either All Right, Spock's or Diane Duane's:  The 1969 version of me shook her fist at Paramount (the studio that had bought out Desilu and then slashed Star Trek's budget) and NBC (the television network that had subsequently canceled the show), saying "Did you hear that?  I told you Star Trek would live on!"

Here were two men from the other side of the Atlantic, who hadn't even been born when the original series was canceled -- yet not only had they heard of Star Trek, it was such an integral part of their world that John felt no need to say, "You're sounding like Mr. Spock from that old American television show Star Trek" -- he could just casually refer to the character without any explanation.

 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm good with all of the above interpretations. :smile: And I think ARS is a fine-looking acronym.... :D 35o46Bs.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of UseWe have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.Privacy PolicyGuidelines.