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Why did Moriarty kill himself?

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For me, the real mystery left is why Moriarty suddenly decided he had to kill himself.  Sherlock somehow forces his hand, and it makes me wonder if we're looking at it all wrong.  What if IOU had something to do with Moriarty's plan for Sherlock's friends (some sort of code) and what if Sherlock's line "I may be on the side of the angels, but don't think for one second that I am one".  What if there is a code in that?  Sherlock says that line in a very odd way, emphasizing "second".  Sherlock uses the Bach Motif when he sing-songs "If I've got you"- which is used in musical cryptograms.  What if Moriarty realizes that Sherlock has broken his recall code- and is happy that Sherlock "got it", and then he decides to off himself in order to win the game?  There's a lot of ifs in this, but I'm trying to get other people's ideas on this because it's probably the least explainable thing that happened.  Any thoughts?

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I may be all wet here but the emphases on the word "second" sounds natural part of the anger in Sherlock's voice. Moriarty has said that he was on the side of the angels. Sherlock is just making the point that he was not one and Moriarty was not to let himself think that Sherlock would forgiving and compassionate. He said that he would gladly go to hell if he was confident that Moriarty was there was well.

 

I can go with Moriarty killing himself if a bid to "win the game". Sherlock has said that he didn't have to jump, that he could use Moriarty to stop the gunmen from killing John, Mrs. Hudson and Lestrade. Could it be that Moriarty realized that if he was taken into custody again he would not be able to rig the trial a second time.....well there's a thing.....a "second" time arrested and put on trial. Maybe this is what decided Moriarty that for him the "game" was truly up. With Sherlock dead in his forced suicide what else would there be.

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Maybe, but Moriarty also says "You can have me arrested, you can torture me, but nothing is going to stop your friends from dying, unless..."  So it seems to me that Moriarty is on a suicide mission no matter what- he just wants to take Sherlock down with him.  But somehow, Sherlock has gotten the upperhand and has spoiled the game for Moriarty, leaving Moriarty no choice BUT to kill himself first (I honestly think that Moriarty would have done it anyway after Sherlock had jumped out of despair that no one would ever be his equal).  Something that Sherlock says is the key to Moriarty understanding that Sherlock HAS the upper hand on him...and he doesn't realize it until Sherlock says the angel line.  I only point out "second" because he put so much emphasis on it, but we see the angel motif running throughout the episode.  Moriarty refers to him as being on the side of the angels and we see the IOU painted in angel wings with graffiti outside of their flat.  I've seen theories about a sniper watching Sherlock- but there's no basis for it and no real evidence.  But Moriarty HAS left Sherlock the clues to figure something out, because he likes to play games and leave riddles.  And I thinking that "something" might be the recall code.  But again, it's just a guess.

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It has been said by others that Moriarty was on a "suicide" mission and that he planned to do himself in once he had forced Sherlock into ending his own life. Just because Moriarty shows bravado in being captured again, he has already been tortured by the order of Mycroft and he had still been able terrorize 12 jurists, Mycroft would make sure that would nor could happen again. Moriarty was being backed into a corner and he knew it. His only hope that he could win the game and to damn with the cost if it destroyed Sherlock and possibly, as a result, Mycroft.

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Even if that is true (that he didn't want to go back to jail), why does he say "I see, you're not ordinary, you're me" after being convinced that Sherlock was simply ordinary?  Just threatening to put him in prison or torture him wouldn't make Moriarty change his mind...it would in fact reinforce the idea that Sherlock was ordinary.  No, I think we're missing a code that Sherlock is giving to Moriarty, but I just don't know what it is.

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Then on that we are in agreement, because I don't know either.

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:)  Yeah, I have several questions from this episode, and it's bugging me that I can't come up with answers to all of them :)  But Sherlock seems to have used a code with the Bach motif, and then Moriarty realizes that he does - so if Sherlock uses that motif, then that's why i'm thinking there was a code after all.

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Unfortunately, I am not familiar with the use of the Bach motif used in cryptograms. Maybe you can fill me in on that? I'm sure that you're right about a code for why else did Moriarty go through such great length in convincing everyone that he had them. He did tell Sherlock that what ever it was he had left him with him at 221b so the focus on the finger tappings. Unless that in itself was some kind of red herring because then Moriarty said that all it really took was some people on the inside to make it look like one code could do the work of three. It's all genius but what is the true answer.

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Maybe, but Moriarty also says "You can have me arrested, you can torture me, but nothing is going to stop your friends from dying, unless..."  So it seems to me that Moriarty is on a suicide mission no matter what- he just wants to take Sherlock down with him.  But somehow, Sherlock has gotten the upperhand and has spoiled the game for Moriarty, leaving Moriarty no choice BUT to kill himself first (I honestly think that Moriarty would have done it anyway after Sherlock had jumped out of despair that no one would ever be his equal). 

 

I agree with this.  Moriarty said in the flat after the trial that he wanted to solve the "final problem."  On the roof we learn what that is: staying alive.  He hates life.  He wants to leave.  He needs to kill Sherlock first.

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When Sherlock sings "If I've got you", the tune he uses is very distinct- the Bach Motif:

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BACH_motif

 

When transcribed-

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Key_signature_names_and_translations

 

It spells "Bach" (when translated in German).  Now, Sherlock could just be using the motif as a reference TO Bach, or he could be hinting at a code that we've all missed.  I worded it badly when I said that the Bach motif was a cryptogram- I meant it more that using the motif itself could mean that Sherlock has solved a riddle that we haven't, and that Bach could be the clue to it.  Hope that makes it clearer :)  Maybe the fact that he got Moriarty to tell him that the fingering was Partita #1?  Lol, no idea :)

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So, could it mean that Sherlock means he knows the link between Richard Brook and "Reichen"bach" Falls."

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I think the key to Moriarty's suicide lies in the lines you've both been quoting (here's the scene from Ariane DeVere's transcript):
 

 

JIM: ... You think you can make me stop the order? You think you can make me do that?
SHERLOCK: Yes. So do you.
JIM: Sherlock, your big brother and all the King’s horses couldn’t make me do a thing I didn’t want to.
SHERLOCK: Yes, but I’m not my brother, remember? I am you – prepared to do anything; prepared to burn; prepared to do what ordinary people won’t do. You want me to shake hands with you in hell? I shall not disappoint you.
JIM: Naah. You talk big. Naah. You’re ordinary. You’re ordinary – you’re on the side of the angels.
SHERLOCK: Oh, I may be on the side of the angels, but don’t think for one second that I am one of them.
JIM: No, you’re not.
JIM: I see. You’re not ordinary. No. You’re me.


Sherlock has deduced that there is a recall code, but Jim thinks he's safe because even Mycroft's people weren't able to make him talk. Sherlock points out that he isn't as civilized as Mycroft, he's like Jim himself, willing to do literally whatever it takes. Jim realizes that he wouldn't be able to stand up under his own brand of torture, so Sherlock really is threat after all. He prevents himself from talking in the only way left, and dies believing he's beaten Sherlock.

 

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I think the key to Moriarty's suicide lies in the lines you've both been quoting (here's the scene from Ariane DeVere's transcript):

 

 

JIM: ... You think you can make me stop the order? You think you can make me do that?

SHERLOCK: Yes. So do you.

JIM: Sherlock, your big brother and all the King’s horses couldn’t make me do a thing I didn’t want to.

SHERLOCK: Yes, but I’m not my brother, remember? I am you – prepared to do anything; prepared to burn; prepared to do what ordinary people won’t do. You want me to shake hands with you in hell? I shall not disappoint you.

JIM: Naah. You talk big. Naah. You’re ordinary. You’re ordinary – you’re on the side of the angels.

SHERLOCK: Oh, I may be on the side of the angels, but don’t think for one second that I am one of them.

JIM: No, you’re not.

JIM: I see. You’re not ordinary. No. You’re me.

 

Sherlock has deduced that there is a recall code, but Jim thinks he's safe because even Mycroft's people weren't able to make him talk. Sherlock points out that he isn't as civilized as Mycroft, he's like Jim himself, willing to do literally whatever it takes. Jim realizes that he wouldn't be able to stand up under his own brand of torture, so Sherlock really is threat after all. He prevents himself from talking in the only way left, and dies believing he's beaten Sherlock.

 

 

Yes, but the key is HOW does Sherlock convince Moriarty he's not as dumb as he seemed only a few seconds ago?  I somehow doubt just looking deeeep into his eyes would do it ;)  Sherlock has said or done something to convince Moriarty that Sherlock was playing him all along on the rooftop.  Moriarty's reaction to Sherlock's statement is odd, very odd, and has always struck me as "not quite right".

 

I'm still trying to figure out exactly what it is that Sherlock does that is out of character which Moffat mentions.  He does so many things that are out of character in this episode it's hard to pinpoint what it is that will explain everything :)

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When Sherlock sings "If I've got you", the tune he uses is very distinct- the Bach Motif:

 

The lyric (and supposedly the few notes) are from "Parachute" by Cheryl Cole

 

Here's a video with lyrics:

 

 

"Parachute"

 

I don't tell anyone about the way you hold my hand

I don't tell anyone about the things that we have planned

Won't tell anybody, won't tell anybody

They want to push me down

They want to see you fall down

 

Won't tell anybody how you turn my world around

I won't tell anyone how your voice is my favourite sound

Won't tell anybody, won't tell anybody

They want to see us fall they want to see us fall

 

I don't need a parachute

Baby, if I've got you

Baby, if I've got you

I don't need a parachute

You're gonna catch me

You're gonna catch if I fall

Down, down, down

 

I don't need a parachute

Baby, if I've got you

Baby, if I've got you

I don't need a parachute

You're gonna catch me

You're gonna catch if I fall

Down, down, down

 

Don't believe the things you tell

Yourself so late at night and

You are your own worst enemy

You'll never win the fight

Just hold on to me, I'll hold on to you

It's you and me up against the world

It's you and me

 

I don't need a parachute

Baby, if I've got you

Baby, if I've got you

I don't need a parachute

You're gonna catch me

You're gonna catch if I fall

Down, down, down

 

I don't need a parachute

Baby, if I've got you

Baby, if I've got you

I don't need a parachute

You're gonna catch me

You're gonna catch if I fall

Down, down, down

 

I won't fall out of love, I won't fall out of

I won't fall out of love, I won't fall out of

I won't fall out of love, I won't fall out of

I won't fall out of love, I'll fall into you

 

I won't fall out of love, I won't fall out of

I won't fall out of love, I won't fall out of

I won't fall out of love, I won't fall out of

I won't fall out of love, I'll fall into you

 

I don't need a parachute

Baby, if I've got you

Baby, if I've got you

I don't need a parachute

You're gonna catch me

You're gonna catch if I fall

Down, down, down

 

I don't need a parachute

Baby, if I've got you

Baby, if I've got you

I don't need a parachute

You're gonna catch me

You're gonna catch if I fall

Down, down, down

 

http://www.azlyrics.com/lyrics/cherylcole/parachute.html

 

 

I just figured Gatiss liked the song.

 

edit: Holy Cow!  I didn't know the link would turn into a video deal - that's so cool!!

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I thought about Parachutes at first, but it's not a song that Sherlock would know, and even the tune he sings in isn't the same.  He said himself that he doesn't keep up with popular culture.  I'm putting more emphasis on the Bach motif because it fits with the Bach motif that is going on throughout the episode.

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Yes, but the key is HOW does Sherlock convince Moriarty he's not as dumb as he seemed only a few seconds ago?

 

 

I think the key is convincing Moriarty he willing to burn, which you can be pretty dumb and still do.  Sherlock tortured a dying man.  He'll do what he has to do - that's what he's saying.  We can speculate a lot  about what Moriarty saw and why he believed, but probably the best answer is: the script said so!  :D

 

As for that out of character clue, I agree with you that he's done so much out of character there's no way to pinpoint, regardless of what Moffat thinks.  However, I think the probability weighs in for Sherlock asking for that moment of privacy - please.  Twice, no less, he says "please."  I choose it because we have a clear BBC Canon statement: "I've never begged for mercy in my life," in SIB.

 

It begs the question: Why does he need to get Moriarty away from the ledge at that point?

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I thought about Parachutes at first, but it's not a song that Sherlock would know, and even the tune he sings in isn't the same.  He said himself that he doesn't keep up with popular culture.  I'm putting more emphasis on the Bach motif because it fits with the Bach motif that is going on throughout the episode.

 

Okay by me.  But I'd think it's more Gatiss liking Bach than a clue of any kind relative to Moriarty.  After all, we have the "Parita #1" reference and you can't actually make binary code out of either of Bach's partitas.  Not enough rests.

 

reichenbachpartita.JPG

 

http://thesherlockblog.blogspot.com/2013/03/the-reichenbach-fall-2.html

 

 

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Yes, but the key is HOW does Sherlock convince Moriarty he's not as dumb as he seemed only a few seconds ago?  I somehow doubt just looking deeeep into his eyes would do it ;)

I don't think Sherlock bothered to convince Jim that he isn't dumb, just that he's as obsessive and as amoral as Jim.

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Jim knows Sherlock isn't dumb. That's why he went through so much trouble to get Sherlock "to come out and play". It was the consulting criminal matching wits with the consulting detective. The timed Five Pips. Sherlock only failed once because Moriarty set up the old woman to make it fail.

 

The use of Richard Brook which in German is Ric Bach. Bach meaning brook. So is there a play on words here as well. "Richard Brook Falls"?

 

Is this also what Sherlock is telling James, that he knows that Richard Brook is a fake....there is no actor. That James Moriarty is all that there is? And that Sherlock doesn't care that his reputation is going up in smoke. He never cared about what people thought of him before.

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Jim knows Sherlock isn't dumb. That's why he went through so much trouble to get Sherlock "to come out and play". It was the consulting criminal matching wits with the consulting detective. The timed Five Pips. Sherlock only failed once because Moriarty set up the old woman to make it fail.

 

The use of Richard Brook which in German is Ric Bach. Bach meaning brook. So is there a play on words here as well. "Richard Brook Falls"?

 

Is this also what Sherlock is telling James, that he knows that Richard Brook is a fake....there is no actor. That James Moriarty is all that there is? And that Sherlock doesn't care that his reputation is going up in smoke. He never cared about what people thought of him before.

 

Reply fail- my reply is in my next post, sorry!

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It begs the question: Why does he need to get Moriarty away from the ledge at that point?

 

 

If you listen very, very closely during that scene, there's what sounds suspiciously like a mobile being used.

 

Or it could be my overactive imagination, of course :).

 

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Oops, sorry- I accidentally hit "post" before I wrote my reply (I'm on my mobile so I can't edit).

 

Actually, Sherlock loses the last one, too. He thinks Moriarty has tried to keep him from finding the missile plans because he wants them- and when he sees John strapped to the bomb, he gets visibly upset. That is what makes Sherlock different from Moriarty- that's why Moriarty looks down on him: because Sherlock genuinely cares about other people. I don't think that Moriarty is scared of Sherlock torturing him on the roof- I think Sherlock convinces Moriarty that he would do anything to win the game - including letting his friends die. Because that's what makes them different.

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I personally don't see the pool scene as a lose, really. Yes, he loses his composure when he sees John strapped to the bomb but he recovers to the point that he is willing to detonate the bomb killing anyone and everyone within the blast radius including John, with John's own consent. So Moriarty already knows that Sherlock is willing to die and kill if it takes Moriarty out as well.

 

Moriarty may not have been afraid of torture but there has been something else going on with him for him to commit suicide if that is what it took to force Sherlock into the jump.

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I personally don't see the pool scene as a lose, really. Yes, he loses his composure when he sees John strapped to the bomb but he recovers to the point that he is willing to detonate the bomb killing anyone and everyone within the blast radius including John, with John's own consent. So Moriarty already knows that Sherlock is willing to die and kill if it takes Moriarty out as well.

 

Moriarty may not have been afraid of torture but there has been something else going on with him for him to commit suicide if that is what it took to force Sherlock into the jump.

 

I mean he loses because Sherlock got it wrong- he thought it was about the Bruce-Partington plans, when in truth, Moriarty was just playing a game with him.  They only survived because Moriarty called it off- even if Sherlock was willing to die to take out Moriarty, it was because Moriarty was forcing him into it.

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I don't believe that Sherlock got it wrong it's just that for Sherlock it was no longer a game. It had been up till the point when the old woman and 11 other people died and Sherlock had to realize that Moriarty set her up for it. Yes, he had played the "game" with relish. He reveled in the challenges. He would pump his arm with enthusiasm and shout "I am on fire!" He would smile when Lestrade asked him what was going on..and say "Something new".

 

But when people actually dies then it changes things for Sherlock and he used the Bruce-Partington plans as bait but it was in hopes to bring this remote voice out of the shadows.

 

Yes, to Moriarty this would be a sign of weakness. Sherlock cared to much. He was not Moriarty. He was on the "side of angels" but Sherlock does have a dark side and he's not afraid to let it take over when events warrant...like setting off a bomb.

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