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Canon References In BBC Sherlock

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I guess that may be true (as Cumberbatch is in his 30's), I shall get around to reading them one day, however I still doubt I will picture BBC Sherlock characters while reading.

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In "The Study In Pink" Sherlock looks at the phone "Harry" gave John and says "Power connection, tiny little scuff marks around the edge. Every night he goes to plug it in to charge but his hands are shaky. You never see those marks on a sober man's phone, never see a drunk's without them." Also comes from the "Sign of the Four". Sherlock is deducing Watson's gold pocket watch.

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This isn't about canon, exactly -- but since there's no thread for meta-canon ....

 

In, I believe, the commentary for "Scandal", Moftiss mentioned that in one of the original stories, John Watson's wife calls him "James," and that in order to explain the discrepancy, "someone" decided that his middle initial "H" must stand for "Hamish" (the Scottish equivalent of "James"). I assumed that they were referring to someone on the Sherlock staff, but recently stumbled across the fact that it was actually Dorothy L. Sayers (1893-1957), author of the "Lord Peter Wimsey" detective series.

 

While following up on that tidbit, I also discovered that this sort of recreational scholarship is sometimes referred to in Sherlockian circles as "The Great Game" -- so in addition to being a fitting title for Episode 3, that was also an in-joke.

 

I think Sherlockian scholars (usually a term for USA scholars) (British are usually Holmesian) call it "The Grand Game". I have a copy of "The Grand Game - A Celebration Of Sherlockian Scholarship" by Laurie R. King and Leslie S Klinger. The writers and contributors for the book refer over and over to your great description of what the Great Game is as the Grand Game. It may be how they refer to it in the USA as apposed to how the day it in Europe.

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Reading this section of the site makes joining another forum worth it. Such fun. Thanks to all for a great holiday evening!

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Thanks for your contributions, onthegokc -- and welcome to Sherlock Forum! :welcome: Hope to see you here often!

 

I can't help noticing that your Sherlock avatar seems to have pointed ears ...

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Sherlock Spock lives!

Sorry, I couldn't resist! :devil:

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Thanks for your contributions, onthegokc -- and welcome to Sherlock Forum! :welcome: Hope to see you here often!

 

I can't help noticing that your Sherlock avatar seems to have pointed ears ...

 

Yes, the art is not original - but as a Sherlock Fan and Star Trek Fan I thought it was cool. Great deduction, Sherlock! Ha.

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There are a lot of us Star Trek fans here. We'll just have to call you Splock! :llap:

 

Oh, and congratulations on reaching your tenth post! Your posts will go straight onto the forum now, no approval necessary.

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When we watched "Scandal" the other day, I noticed Irene's line after she drugs Sherlock (just before John walks in) -- "Good night, Mr. Sherlock Holmes," which is a quote from the original story. The circumstances in which Irene says the line are very different, but in each case, it occurs just as she has "beaten" him.

 

Hmm -- is that what really bothers me about this adaptation -- that Irene never truly beats Sherlock? In the original story, she does, which is apparently why he thinks so highly of her that he calls her "the woman." By contrast, when he uses that phrase at the end of the episode, he seems to crowing over beating her, and twice at that (once with the password, and again when he rescues her).

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There are a lot of us Star Trek fans here. We'll just have to call you Splock! :llap:

 

Oh, and congratulations on reaching your tenth post! Your posts will go straight onto the forum now, no approval necessary.

 

Thank you and appreciate the forum/post information.

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I liked the nod to "The Adventure of the Black Peter" at the beginning of "Hounds of the Baskerville's". Sherlock storming into the flat carrying a bloodied harpoon. Also the reference to needing something stronger then cigarettes, like "a seven percent solution" before he starts to deduce Mrs. Hudson.

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Given that it is based on Conan's work , i am sure there are lot of references. It is on us to find it.

 

One of the very obvious ones was the reference to his other works in "scandal in Belgravia."  E.g. 'The Geek interpreter' which was "The Greek Interpreter' in ACD's original works , also 'The speckled Blonde' which was originally 'The speckled band'

 

P.S What is Canon references? Was this a serial which came before Sherlock, i saw it in some other thread here in the forum. Or is it just Conan mispelled?

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Nope, it's not just Conan Doyle misspelt.  I believe that "canon" (pronounced the same as the big gun "cannon") started out as a church term, but now refers to the "authoritative" body of work in any field.  For example, the Star Trek canon would generally refer to the tv shows and movies, but would exclude fan fiction.

 

There's some diversity of opinion as to what constitutes Holmes canon.  I assume everyone would include all of Conan Doyle's Holmes stories, and a lot of people stop there.  Moftiss have said that they consider "everything" to be canon, including the Rathbone-and-Bruce movies, the Jeremy Brett episodes, and the Downey-and-Law movies (though I very much doubt that you'll see Sherlock borrow anything from Elementary in the near future, as there seems to be some bad blood there).  I'm reasonably certain that they exclude fan fiction.

 

Then there's what we fans sometimes refer to as the Sherlock canon, meaning anything that's definitely been established as fact in Sherlock or stated as fact by Moftiss.

 

The term "Moftiss" may also be new to you.  It refers to Steven Moffat and Mark Gatiss (the co-creators of Sherlock and two of the three writers) as a joint entity.  This is partly because they tend to make joint decisions, partly because on the DVDs they often finish each other's sentences, and partly because we sometimes don't happen to remember who said what.

 

Congratulations on your second post!  Just eight more, and you won't have to wait for staff approval before your post becomes visible.

 

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I just started reading the original stories by ACD yesterday and I'm sooooo impressed by Moffat and Gatiss. I mean, I knew they were brilliant before, but I only read about 20 pages so far and there're soooo many references already! They're geniuses!!

.

 

Or, like you, they read the stories.  Doesn't take a genius to borrow and reference another's work.

 

Yikes, I'm grumpy today.

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Nope, it's not just Conan Doyle misspelt.  I believe that "canon" (pronounced the same as the big gun "cannon") started out as a church term, but now refers to the "authoritative" body of work in any field.  For example, the Star Trek canon would generally refer to the tv shows and movies, but would exclude fan fiction.

 

Just for interest:

 

 

can·on  
/ˈkanən/
Noun
  1. A general law, rule, principle, or criterion by which something is judged.
  2. A member of the clergy on the staff of a cathedral, esp. a member of the chapter.

 

 

People may not know that the writings we call the Bible were and still are the "Canon of Scripture."  They were the writings referred to by early Christians when they wanted to judge what people were teaching with what was Dogma or doctrine. 

 

In modern times, anything that is a rule of law, or a standard against which something is judged becomes Canon.

 

I didn't know Mofftiss had defined "all things Holmes" as Canon!  That's great. 

 

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I didn't know Mofftiss had defined "all things Holmes" as Canon!  That's great.

They were not the first but these two do seem to have an extensive collection and knowledge of their subjects and by defining "all things Holmes" it gives them a whole lot of material to throw at us. They have already "borrowed" quite heavily from the movie "The Private Life of Sherlock Holmes".

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Doesn't take a genius to borrow and reference another's work.

Takes some ingenuity to do it cleverly, though.

 

 

Yikes, I'm grumpy today.

You're allowed!

 

 

I didn't know Mofftiss had defined "all things Holmes" as Canon! That's great.

On one of the DVDs, they said "We decided that everything's canon," by which they seem to mean mostly old movies and such, though they've also used a few bits of fan lore, such as Dorothy Sayer's suggestion that Watson's middle name is "Hamish."

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And it does make since that it the H. in Dr. John H. Watson would be Hamish this "James" in that one of John's wife's would call him "James" later on. Maybe it was her way of showing some sort of displeasure. Like when a mother will recite a child's full name when she is greatly peeved.

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It was also mentioned on the "Elementary, My Dear Watson: The Man Behind Sherlock Holmes" DVD (that I mentioned elsewhere recently) that Conan Doyle had known a James Watson, who may have contributed some characteristics (as well as his surname) to the good doctor.

 

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that Conan Doyle had known a James Watson, who may have contributed some characteristics (as well as his surname) to the good doctor.

Yup, and as serendipity would have it, this James Watson was a doctor as well.

 

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More references to the canon:

 

- Sherlock looking for his cigarettes in a slipper.

- The counter on John's blog being stuck on the number "1895".

- Sherlock commenting on another character gaining weight.

- The countdown in "The Great Game".

- Moriarty's "Dear me, Mr. Holmes. Dear me."

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Also in the "Hounds of the Baskervilles" suggesting that Henry Knight spending the night on the Moor.

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Okay, I'm afraid I've already mentioned these elsewhere, but this seems to be the right place:

 

- Sherlock pretending to die, making himself appear (nearly) dead, making a touching speech to Watson in which he tells him to stand away from him and to retell the scene exactly as he perceived it. Holmes apparently also mentally deranged and crying. This in order to trick a villain into thinking he's won. And making Watson truly believe the whole thing is real so he will act convincingly in front of the villain, because Holmes does not trust him to lie well enough. Seems familiar? See end of Reichenbach Fall.

 

- A volatile hallucinatory drug being used a weapon. Holmes testing the effects of this drug on Watson. Also familiar? See The Hounds of Baskerville. Although, in the original story ("The Devil's Foot"), Holmes primarily tests the stuff on himself, Watson joins in voluntarily and Holmes apologizes afterwards for having exposed him to such a danger. Just another example of Holmes being a lot more caring and considerate in Arthur Conan Doyle's world...

 

- There are 3 police officers that are mentioned regularly in the ACD stories: Lestrade, Jones, Gregson. On TV, we have Greg Lestrade.

 

- The speech about the police coming to Sherlock when they are out of their depths "which is always" can be found in "The Sign of Four" (where it is "their normal state")

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- "The Adventure of the Bruce-Partington Plans" is incorporated in the episode The Great Game.

- Holmes' preferred method of communication is the telegram. Sherlock "prefers to text"

 

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A poison inducing Tetanus as a murder weapon in "The Sign of Four" - The botox murder in The Great Game. Also, the butler in Mr. Sholto's household is called Lal Rao, the houseboy who killed the TV presenter is called Raoul.

 

A body switch that enables somebody now supposed dead to escape his enemies, the body falsely identified because the face is so badly injured - originally in "The Valley of Fear", here seen in A Scandal in Belgravia ("the face is a little bashed up" on Irene's supposed corpse).

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