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Jeremy Brett


Alice Holmes
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Oops, sorry to post ON-topic, but we watched "The Sign of Four" tonight, and I noticed three things:

 

1.  In the original story, the "sign" was like this:  ++++  whereas in this episode, it was sort of an "8" with a little piece of the top missing (which Holmes points out is a Sikh numeral "4"):

 

FOUR.GIF

 

We've had discussions over on the "Blind Banker" thread about how many similarities BB has with Conan Doyle's "Sign" -- but in this case, I'm reminded more of the Brett episode, because one of the yellow ciphers in BB also looked something like an open-topped "8," which Sherlock discovers is an ancient Chinese numeral "5" (thanks to aithine's screen caps!):

 

sherlock-102-02728.jpg

 

And in both, the numerals are a death threat.

 

2.  As I predicted to Alex before we started watching the episode, Watson does NOT propose marriage to Mary Morstan, or even ask her out on a date.  He merely mentions several times to Sherlock how attractive she is.  (Presumably they didn't want Watson moving away from Baker Street.)

 

3.  Tonga was obviously played by someone very short, wearing fake teeth and a ton of makeup.  According to the credits, that was Kiran Shah, our favorite 4'1" professional stuntman!  He has also played an Ewok in Star Wars, a goblin in Harry Potter, and of course has doubled for numerous hobbits, including Martin Freeman's Bilbo.

 

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Oh, you're right! I hadn't really noticed that about the ciphers being such a commonality, I guess I wasn't really paying attention. And I think I saw Brett's Sign a long time ago, but I don't remember much about it.

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  • 2 months later...

The funny thing is I wasn't convinced of Martin Freeman until I saw his first scene with Benedict Cumberbatch. It was then that I was utterly convinced.

I believe I remember that either Moffat or Gatiss said that very thing in one of the commentaries.  That when they started reading together they knew they had their team.

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I've read through this thread entirely now, and it's so nice to read such a nice tribute to Jeremy and the Granada series.

 

I'm one who also feels that he is the definitive Victorian Sherlock Holmes.  And I really do doubt there will ever be another production that attempts to do the stories as faithfully as Granada.

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Earlier in this thread, there was a discussion of which Watson do people prefer, and I couldn't join in because I hadn't seen the series since it was originally aired.  We bought the DVD, and have watched the whole thing about one-and-a-half times -- so now I can play!

 

My answer:  I love 'em both.  When we started watching the first time, I was aware that David Burke was in only the first few, and I liked him so well that I was dreading the switchover.  I soon became very fond of Edward Hardwicke's performances, though, and began to wonder which one I really did prefer -- so when we'd finished the first run-through, I suggested we watch the first couple of episodes again (and somehow we're still going).  Burke's performance is a bit broader (more theatrical), and his Watson is more overtly appreciative of Holmes's successes.  Hardwicke's Watson is a bit quieter and more reserved.

 

It occurs to me that I'm seeing somewhat the same thing in Sherlock, with John seeming considerably more impressed by Sherlock at first, and growing more accustomed to his feats as time goes on.  Although that does seem perfectly natural, still I wonder if the writers were at all influenced by Burke and Hardwicke in that regard?  I'm also wondering whether Hardwicke's Watson was intentionally written lower-key, to reflect the character's by-then longer acquaintance with Holmes -- or -- did Conan Doyle's Watson start taking Holmes almost for granted in later cases, and more recent writers are simply reflecting that change?

 

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 Not for granted I think, just Watson began to see how Holmes worked his deductive "magic" and was even able to begin to use some of it himself. So it would take the edge off of his own awe of the "Master".

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Well, I think, upon meeting someone like Sherlock, one's surprise would be quite severe at first...

 

  Oh absolutely. There is more then one writer, even very early on, that hinted that there might have been something more then the terrestrial about Holmes and why he has been so easily linked with a certain Vulcan we all know and love.

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In my 40 years as a Sherlockian, I've known a number of what I call "Sherlockian Trekkies."  One seems to go right along with the other.

 

As for Brett's Watsons, Burke is my favorite, although I like Hardwicke very much too.  Hardwicke took over beautifully, and as you all have said, he seemed to have matured the character and his relationship with Holmes.

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Apparently Hardwicke felt that his first order of business was to blend into what had already been filmed.  He even wore lifts for a while (since he was shorter than Burke) -- until Brett offered to portray Holmes in a perpetual crouch.

 

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I saw in one of the DVD extras that Edward Hardwicke had to memorize all his "reading from the newspaper" dialogue since he couldn't read without his glasses.

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I was just wondering if anyone has ever seen the Jeremy Brett TV show of Sherlock Holmes. I watched this long before I had even heard of the BBC Sherlock, and I wanted to know if there were other viewers out there, and what they think of it. :)

I've just finished watching all the episodes for the first time. My goodness! What a fantastic Sherlock! I read the books and thats what led me to watch them :-) I'm just sad that I've watched them all now :D

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I was just wondering if anyone has ever seen the Jeremy Brett TV show of Sherlock Holmes. I watched this long before I had even heard of the BBC Sherlock, and I wanted to know if there were other viewers out there, and what they think of it. :)

I've just finished watching all the episodes for the first time. My goodness! What a fantastic Sherlock! I read the books and thats what led me to watch them :-) I'm just sad that I've watched them all now :D

 

I'm always envious of someone who experiences the Granada series for the first time.  I can watch them all again and again, and they're always great, but it's nothing like the first time.  It's like reading a great book.

 

Good on ya!  :applause:

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I was just wondering if anyone has ever seen the Jeremy Brett TV show of Sherlock Holmes. I watched this long before I had even heard of the BBC Sherlock, and I wanted to know if there were other viewers out there, and what they think of it. :)

I've just finished watching all the episodes for the first time. My goodness! What a fantastic Sherlock! I read the books and thats what led me to watch them :-) I'm just sad that I've watched them all now :D
I'm always envious of someone who experiences the Granada series for the first time.  I can watch them all again and again, and they're always great, but it's nothing like the first time.  It's like reading a great book.

 

Good on ya!  :applause:

 

:D They're great adaptions too as most of them are faithful to the original stories. At first I didn't like the change from David Burke to Edward Hardwicke. It was like in Doctor Who with a regeneration! :lol: But in the end I prfered his Watson from Burke's. I might just start watching them again! :D

Edited by Carol the Dabbler
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We're on our second run-through, and if anything, I'm enjoying them more this time.  For one thing, I'm catching more of the humor.

 

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Yes, and I really cracked up the time that Watson tells Holmes to hurry up, there's a cab waiting -- after so many instances of the other way round.  I do believe the dear doctor was enjoying the experience!

 

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We were talking in a thread about where Gatiss and Moffat got the idea of having Sherlock wrap up in a sheet. There is one snippet in the Canon where Holmes and Watson are in a turkish bath and they are lying under sheets. I found this little gem on line:

 

   

tumblr_luj3efrspH1qfj8xoo1_500.jpg
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You're welcome, it's fun making all these little connections between all the different versions of Doyle, The Canon and what each actor has brought to it.

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