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I woke myself up today sniggering about how funny it would be if the first letters of Benedict Cumberbatch's names were switched around, and his name sounded like Kennedict Bumberbatch.  In what context I was dreaming that and why I thought it was so funny, I have no idea, lol.

 

 

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^ Biting only once is a myth, I read:

 

Myth

The mosquito dies after she takes a blood meal.

 

Fact

Mosquitoes are capable of biting more than once. After the female mosquito takes a blood meal she completes the development of her eggs and may deposit up to 200 eggs. She may then seek another blood meal.

 

http://www.cmcd.org/biology-2/mosquito-myths-facts/

 

Well, darn!  Though I never did think she'd bite once and die, because I knew that the blood enabled her to lay eggs.  Sounds like the second bite may be optional, though.  And at least she wouldn't be continuing to harass someone after she'd bitten them once (at least not till next week).

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I woke myself up today sniggering about how funny it would be if the first letters of Benedict Cumberbatch's names were switched around, and his name sounded like Kennedict Bumberbatch. In what context I was dreaming that and why I thought it was so funny, I have no idea, lol.

Maybe He wants being one Kenedict :p

 

Maybe you have a feeling his name is actually Kenedict. :D

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^ Biting only once is a myth, I read:

 

Myth

The mosquito dies after she takes a blood meal.

 

Fact

Mosquitoes are capable of biting more than once. After the female mosquito takes a blood meal she completes the development of her eggs and may deposit up to 200 eggs. She may then seek another blood meal.

 

http://www.cmcd.org/biology-2/mosquito-myths-facts/

A monster emerged from me.

 

Where are 200 eggs!!!?

 

Vamper wants my blood, i give but mosquito

 

No no no

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^ Biting only once is a myth, I read:

 

Myth

The mosquito dies after she takes a blood meal.

 

Fact

Mosquitoes are capable of biting more than once. After the female mosquito takes a blood meal she completes the development of her eggs and may deposit up to 200 eggs. She may then seek another blood meal.

 

http://www.cmcd.org/biology-2/mosquito-myths-facts/

Well, darn! Though I never did think she'd bite once and die, because I knew that the blood enabled her to lay eggs. Sounds like the second bite may be optional, though. And at least she wouldn't be continuing to harass someone after she'd bitten them once (at least not till next week).

I agree with you, Carol.

 

Next week is fairly reasonable offer. :D

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I just read this on Tumblr, and it's about 95% me to a T: http://p-3a-s-life-resources.tumblr.com/post/115347374289/atypical-autism-traits
 

Atypical Autism Traits
 
The [ original source ] for these is highly gendered.
 
Under the cut, I am retyping the original source in gender-neutral language, as atypical autism traits do not only appear in girls.
 
If you are Autistic and your autism matches this profile, it does not mean that you must be a girl; it just means your autism is a kind that often gets missed by traditional diagnostic profiles. These traits were commonly found by researchers in cisgender girls, but they are by no means exclusive to cisgender girls.
 
The traits are split into four categories.

Appearance / Personal Habits

  • Dresses comfortably due to sensory issues and practicality
     
  • Will not spend much time on grooming and hair. Hairstyles usually have to be ‘wash and wear’. Can be quite happy not grooming at all at times.
     
  • Eccentric personality; may be reflected in appearance
     
  • Is youthful for their age, in looks, dress, behaviour, and tastes
     
  • Usually a little more expressive in face and gesture than some other Autistic people
     
  • May have androgynous traits. Thinks of themself as half-male/half female
     
  • May not have a strong sense of identity, and can be very chameleon-like, especially before diagnosis
     
  • Enjoys reading and films as a retreat, often scifi, fantasy, children’s, can have favourites which are a refuge
     
  • Uses control as a stress management technique; rules, discipline, rigid in certain habits, which will contradict their seeming unconventionality.
     
  • Usually happiest at home or in other controlled environment.
Intellectual / Giftedness / Education / Vocation
  • May have been diagnosed as Autistic when young, or may have been thought of as gifted, shy, sensitive, etc. May also have had obvious or severe learning deficits
     
  • Often musical, artistic
     
  • May have a savant skill or strong talent(s)
     
  • May have a strong interest in computers, games, science, graphic design, inventing, things of a technological and visual nature. More verbal thinkers may gravitate to writing, languages, cultural studies, psychology
     
  • May have been a self-taught reader, been hyperlexic as a child, and will possess a wide variety of other self-taught skills as well
     
  • May be highly educated but will have had to struggle with social aspects of college. May have one or many partial degrees
     
  • Can be very passionate about a course of study or job, and then change direction or go completely cold on it very quickly
     
  • Will often have trouble holding onto a job and may find employment daunting
     
  • Highly intelligent, yet sometimes can be slow to comprehend due to sensory and cognitive processing issues
     
  • Will not do well with verbal instruction - needs to write down or draw diagram
     
  • Obsessions (passions / special interests) are not necessarily unusual
Emotional / Physical
  • Emotionally immature and emotionally sensitive
     
  • Anxiety and fear are predominant emotions
     
  • More open to talk about feelings and emotional issues than people with typical autism
     
  • Strong sensory issues - sounds, sights, smells, touch, and prone to overload. (May not have taste/food texture issues.)
     
  • Moody and prone to bouts of depression. May have been diagnosed with mood disorders such as Bipolar Disorder, while the autism diagnosis was missed (note from typist: this doesn’t mean the other diagnoses are necessarily incorrect; just that they were comorbid with something that went undetected)
     
  • Probably given several different prescriptions to treat symptoms. Will be very sensitive to medications and anything else they put in their body so may have had adverse reactions
     
  • 9 out of 10 have mild to severe gastro-intestinal issues (e.g. ulcers, acid reflux, Irritable Bowel Syndrome, and so on)
     
  • Stims to soothe when sad or agitated; rocking, face-rubbing, humming, finger flicking, leg bouncing, finger or foot tapping, etc
     
  • Similarly physical when happy - hand-flapping, clapping, singing, jumping, running around, dancing, bouncing
     
  • Prone to temper or crying meltdowns, even in public; sometimes over seemingly small things due to sensory or emotional overload
     
  • Hates injustice and hates to be misunderstood; this can incite anger and rage
     
  • Prone to mutism when stressed or upset, especially after a meltdown. Less likely to stutter than some other Autistic people but may have a raspy voice, monotone at times, when stressed or sad
Social / Relationships
  • Words and actions are often misunderstood by others
     
  • Perceived to be cold-natured and self-centred; unfriendly
     
  • Is very outspoken at times, may get very fired up when talking about passions / special interests / obsessions
     
  • Can be very shy or mute
     
  • Like people with typical autism, will shut down in social situations once overloaded, but is generally better at socialising in small doses. May even give the appearance of being skilled, but it is a “performance”
     
  • Doesn’t go out much. Will prefer to go out with partner only or children if they have them (note from typist: I find I have a short list of “safe people” who I prefer to go out with, and I will refuse to go out if none of those people are available)
     
  • Will not have many close friends, and will not conform to gender stereotypical activities with friends, or have get-togethers to “hang out” with friends
     
  • Will have a close friend or friends in school, but not once adulthood is reached
     
  • May or may not want to have a relationship. If they are interested in a relationship, they probably take it very seriously, but may choose to remain celibate or alone
     
  • Due to sensory issues, will either really enjoy sex or strongly dislike it
     
  • If they like someone romantically, they can be extremely, noticeably awkward in attempts to let them know e.g. may stare or call repeatedly, “fixating” on the person. This may change with maturity
     
  • Often prefers the company of animals but not always due to sensory issues.
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Vamper wants my blood, i give but mosquito

No no no

Wait.. you would let vampire bite you?

Anyone wants to bite me, they should expect being flat-faced with cooking pan.

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Those autism traits: imo, half of that describes most of the people on the planet.

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I've never heard that. Is someone suggesting it's true?

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Well, darn!  Though I never did think she'd bite once and die, because I knew that the blood enabled her to lay eggs.  Sounds like the second bite may be optional, though.  And at least she wouldn't be continuing to harass someone after she'd bitten them once (at least not till next week).

 

 

I've been bitten by the same mosquito more than once, when they don't fill up or get interrupted in the middle of their first bite.  The worst is getting two bites in the same spot, ugh!

 

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A monster emerged from me.

Where are 200 eggs!!!?

 

Relax, it's not like Alien (am I thinking of Alien?) -- mosquitos don't lay their eggs on you, they lay them in water.

 

Those autism traits: imo, half of that describes most of the people on the planet.

 

Are you talking about the half that apply to me?  (Though in my case it may be more like 2/3 or 3/4.)

 

Is it true that everyone is in Autism spectrum?

 

Well, if the spectrum has completely autistic at one end and completely non-autistic at the other, then yes, by definition.  And I suspect that the distribution is some sort of bell curve, with very few people being either 0% or 100%, so practically everyone will have at least a few "autistic" characteristics.

 

Which means that from a practical standpoint, many people (professionals and amateurs alike) will tend to overdiagnosis, especially when autism happens to be the Syndrome of the Week.  Just because nearly everyone has some autistic traits, that doesn't mean that we all need to be "treated."

 

I've been bitten by the same mosquito more than once, when they don't fill up or get interrupted in the middle of their first bite.  The worst is getting two bites in the same spot, ugh!

 

Now I'm trying to figure out how you know it's the same mosquito.  (I've never been able to get mine to wear name tags.)  Though I suppose if a mosquito got into my bedroom, I'd tend to assume / hope that it was only the one.

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Now I'm trying to figure out how you know it's the same mosquito.  (I've never been able to get mine to wear name tags.)  Though I suppose if a mosquito got into my bedroom, I'd tend to assume / hope that it was only the one.

 

Lol, name tags.  Well in some cases I've slapped at one while it was biting me, missed it, and watched it land on me and bite me somewhere else.  But yes, I was talking about the times I've been inside with only one mosquito in the room, and I knew with at least 99% certainty it was the only one.  Obviously outside it's impossible to tell for sure, especially since I tend to attract them all to myself.  I can be outside with another person or group, and still be the only one who gets bitten up.

 

 

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You might try smearing yourself with fresh catnip. I've heard that it's just about the best mosquito repellant there is.

 

Of course, then you have to deal with all those cats....

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Those autism traits: imo, half of that describes most of the people on the planet.

 

Are you talking about the half that apply to me?  (Though in my case it may be more like 2/3 or 3/4.)

 

"I don't know, you tell me!" :D

 

 

Is it true that everyone is in Autism spectrum?

 

Well, if the spectrum has completely autistic at one end and completely non-autistic at the other, then yes, by definition.  And I suspect that the distribution is some sort of bell curve, with very few people being either 0% or 100%, so practically everyone will have at least a few "autistic" characteristics.

 

Which means that from a practical standpoint, many people (professionals and amateurs alike) will tend to overdiagnosis, especially when autism happens to be the Syndrome of the Week.  Just because nearly everyone has some autistic traits, that doesn't mean that we all need to be "treated."

 

I still remember listening to a program on NPR about a college girl diagnosed with autism, and as some expert was describing her, I'm thinking "geez, that sounds exactly like me at that age!" I don't remember the specifics, but it was something about being socially awkward and/or introverted. Needless to say, I tend to think they are overdiagnosing too. :rolleyes:

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You might try smearing yourself with fresh catnip. I've heard that it's just about the best mosquito repellant there is.

 

Of course, then you have to deal with all those cats....

 

Thanks for the suggestion!  I've tried so many things, but not that yet.  I'd happily take the cats, lol.

 

 

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I also agree on the over diagnosis of autism. In my family, it's a case of under diagnosis. When I saw the criteria they used to check my son, I realized my dad was on it but never diagnosed due to his age. My sister and I are both likely to be on the spectrum but she won't be diagnosed because of other mental health issues, and I can't afford to be tested or I would.

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I've never heard that. Is someone suggesting it's true?

Yes, heard it somewhere, but I remember doubting the source.

 

@Carol, yes technically. But I suppose they have other categories. Maybe. Don't know how to give the example without mentioning something that can't be question in the technicality though.

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I was sent off to be diagnosed for a similar sort of 'disorder' before, and the psychiatric nurse doing the assessment was a complete idiot. She seemed to think that because I come across as fairly articulate and intelligent there was nothing wrong. I wasn't there to be diagnosed with stupidity - how smart I may or may not be was not the point. 

 

I think a lot of people are socially awkward these days - I'm not sure if that's because people are on the spectrum or just the state of modern society. I talk to way more people through a screen in a day that I do face to face in real life. 

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That's why I hate telling people I'm autistic, I dread the whole "but you look so..... normal' quote.

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The thing is, reading through that list of autism traits (which I didn't have time to do earlier) it is so long and comprehensive most people are going to identify with parts of it. 

 

Something I often wonder about, and maybe you guys all have opinions on this, is the importance of labels. I'm not talking about things that need diagnosis in order for treatment, that's a different category, I mean things things that are less severe and could just be personality traits. I'm never sure whether labelling things is beneficial or not. I suppose in one way you have a community to belong to and associate with, on the other hand I think labels can be pretty constraining. 

 

For some random examples; do I need to know 'I do [this] because I am [this]'? Or 'I just do it because that's the way I am'? It's similar with sexuality, do I need to label myself as A, B, C etc or just 'I am what I am'? 

 

Like I said I'm also conflicted which way is better. Sometimes I try to fit myself into boxes and then wonder if there is any point. Any thoughts anyone?

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I hate labels, my gay label can get me fired in the US and my autistic label is the reason I had trouble getting a job. But I met some people are glad that labels exist because they felt "different" their entire life and couldn't put a finger on the why, so YMMV.

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So you hate them, but do you feel they are important for you to have? For your own personal identity?

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