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Just now, Artemis said:

That might be what I end up doing after all... but it's hard for me to let go of the cases, lol.  I wish there were a way to keep them and also free up space.  A magical, mystical way...

 

Ditch the plastic and keep the paper 'covers'. Fold them to cover the discs and then put that in a disc-folder.

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I moved all my CDs into plastic jackets. But apparently DVDs are more sensitive so I was a bit unsure about them. But at work we've had many spare slim CD-cases, so I took some home and used them for my DVDs. The inlays have to be stored elsewhere.


CDs
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DVDs

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Our DVDs are currently stacked on shelves behind the living room door, on top of the hi-fi system, in a box or two in the guest room, and in a couple of drawers.  My husband claims they're organized, but even he has trouble finding specific ones.  So I'm planning a system:

I happen to have a number of not-too-deep metal shelves that I used to use for paperback books.  I also have a package of blank magnetic labels that can be written on with a wet-erase marker.  So I figure on shelving the DVDs as though they were books (i.e., with all the spines visible), with mag labels marking the categories.  The remaining question is, where to put the shelves (which are currently stored in the basement)?  I'm not even sure how many we'll need -- but we'll figure out something.

As for the categories, I'm mostly in agreement with Besley -- alphabetical by title.  That's only for the miscellaneous ones, but they probably constitute most of our collection.  Then all our Sherlock DVDs will go together, all the Harry Potters, the Tolkiens, etc., regardless of their individual titles.  Plus we'll group some by actor.  And there has to be a section for holiday movies.

The only problem I see is how to categorize DVDs that belong in two or more special categories -- e.g., we have a couple of holiday movies with Martin Freeman.  I don't think we have very many of those two-fers, though, so we could easily make up a few dummy cases for cross-referencing purposes.

We're not likely to tackle this for a while, because it's not as pressing as some other projects.  But I'll let y'all know how it turns out.

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4 hours ago, Sheerluck said:

I got rid of most of my cases and keep them in a file folder. I only kept the cases for my favourite films. I've pretty much switched to digital platform now so I haven't bought a new disc in a couple of years.

That was going to be my next suggestion, only I was thinking more a 3-ring binder type thing with plastic sheets, so you can flip through and enjoy looking at the artwork. I have a small photo album that would be just the right size for DVDs, e.g.

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24 minutes ago, Sheerluck said:

Yes, I meant one of those dedicated disc folders. They usually hold around a hundred discs I think.

I've barely heard of those.  Could you link to one on Amazon or whatever?

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5 hours ago, Carol the Dabbler said:

I've barely heard of those.  Could you link to one on Amazon or whatever?

I have two of them that I bought from Target.  They each hold 256 discs, but there are other sizes that hold 128, 64, 24, etc.

 

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Those CD/DVD binder are both practical and not. Mostly they don't hold up to actual capacity, it would get so fat that it's a struggle to close the zipper. Now if we put the sleeve as well (like I did) it looks about to burst, I could never fit to the max capacity, it also gets distorted quite badly. 

Back then I just stacked them together in the DVD container (the one that comes when you buy re-writable empty DVD, but I have converted to digital file in hard disk for years,  mostly because it's more convenient to bring them around and CD/DVD player starts to have problem if it's not constantly used. I had tried to sell my CD collection (back when it's still in circulation) but it fetched very pitiful money that I changed to donate it instead to charity bazaar since (I think) it was a good quality movie selections. At that time I also donated couple of old phones in exchange of having a tree planted on my name for each phone. I still have couple of old phone that I'm keeping, they are not completely dead, still usable for very basic function merely because they are obselete(very little memory, OS not compatible with new apps, or no spare battery when the old one spoiled and not in production anymore, and my last one refused to charge). It's painful to see the rate of things being obsolete.

My DVDs, I don't have much, but still keeping them, but I probably would give them away if I have space problem, now they are still messily kept in some corners, my player is also not working really well. My Sherlock's DVD are still brand new in the box, those I will keep. Sentimental, I know that guy, you know. :)

I want to get rid of a lot of things in my life but it's always difficult isn't it? I have shelves and shelves of books too, but never entertain even in my imagination to get rid of them.

ETA: I have this smaller pool table (5f) that I bought after so many consideration, with very good deal that I love a lot. It's in my remote home now, and one of the very blatant reminder of my existence, that despite almost everyone trying to get rid of it, they would have to do it over my dead body. 

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14 minutes ago, Van Buren Supernova said:

Back then I just stacked them together in the DVD container

That's what I used to do with all my backup files and program discs. But now everything is downloadable or on an external hard drive, so I use it to keep art supplies in instead. :smile:  

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33 minutes ago, Arcadia said:

That's what I used to do with all my backup files and program discs. But now everything is downloadable or on an external hard drive, so I use it to keep art supplies in instead.

Which art supplies that can be kept there? That means you have to turn it upside down?

No artist, but I like art and craft, and art supplies are messyyyyyyy. Cut fabric, half-mixed paint, small pieces of material, uneven leftover wood cutting, rolls of fancy paper, the only way I manage to keep it neatly is by throwing them in the container or closed cupboard, and attempt to arrange them only last for a while.

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3 hours ago, Van Buren Supernova said:

Those CD/DVD binder are both practical and not. Mostly they don't hold up to actual capacity, it would get so fat that it's a struggle to close the zipper. Now if we put the sleeve as well (like I did) it looks about to burst, I could never fit to the max capacity, it also gets distorted quite badly.

I had that problem with some of the older disc folders that I bought back in the day, but not the one I linked to in my last post.  I have them filled to capacity and there’s room to spare.

3 hours ago, Van Buren Supernova said:

I want to get rid of a lot of things in my life but it's always difficult isn't it? I have shelves and shelves of books too, but never entertain even in my imagination to get rid of them.

Oh yes, I have an even worse problem with books than I do with DVD’s, lol.  I have managed to force myself to part with some of them, but I still have soooo many, and I regret half the ones I gave away.

 

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7 hours ago, Van Buren Supernova said:

Which art supplies that can be kept there? That means you have to turn it upside down?

Yep, it makes a great bucket for whatever bits of things I'm working with. Brushes, palette knives, pencils, bits of paper ... cut fabric, half-mixed paint, small pieces of material, uneven leftover wood cutting, rolls of fancy paper.... :D 

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We've used file folders for discs at work and it's not very handy. They get quite heavy and you have to lift/handle them each time you want something. Generally it's much more work than just picking discs from a shelf/box/drawer.

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27 minutes ago, J.P. said:

Generally it's much more work than just picking discs from a shelf/box/drawer.

More cumbersome, but less space!

 

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15 hours ago, Van Buren Supernova said:

It's painful to see the rate of things being obsolete.

 

Obsolete or not designed to be repairable, I agree.  :blowmytop:

 

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Indeed.

Anyway, It is still getting worse out there. Haiz.

Next time when things get better and we have money to spurge, change our doorknobs to brass and utensil to silver. They are good for this kind of  current situation with the oligodynamic effect to sanitize themselves. I make my own hand sanitizer haphazardly and could feel my own hand falling apart because it's mostly alcohol (and I have the roughest worker's hands). I use them whenever I touch something out there, if I have to go out.

Anyway, have you guys heard about biosphere 2 projects? Somehow these lockdowns remind me of that, but they are still considered as unsuccessful to provide long-term sustainable habitable environment, it would be neat if we have those lying around to really contain the situation, or, maybe not, since we have complication of long incubation and asymptomatic case. Haiz. 

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VBS, oligodynamic effect does not apply to viruses. Actually, COVID9 can survive longer on metal than in textiles. And yes, I was surprised too.

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9 hours ago, J.P. said:

COVID9 can survive longer on metal than in textiles. And yes, I was surprised too.

 

I read that too -- something like three days on stainless steel, but only about a day on cardboard.  Odd.

 

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I don't know what EXACTLY they were testing, so it's hard to say. But still, the self-disinfecting metallic surfaces don't apply to COVID19.
Probably to other viruses too. AFAIK the oligodynamic effect is slowing the metabolism of bacteria. Viruses don't have any metabolism.

German Wikipedia says the effect is not very reliable and the mechanism is still not understood very well.

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I had no idea Wiki had different nationalities!

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On 4/5/2020 at 4:34 AM, J.P. said:

VBS, oligodynamic effect does not apply to viruses.

Indeed there are so many things unknown about Covid19, which is why we are in the mess right now, including the missing link of how it's transmitted to human I suppose. But beside being effective for bacterias, especially Salmonella and E.coli, even MRSA superbug, there are cases when olygodynamic applies to viruses as well.

Oligodynamic effect has been found effective in Coronavirus 229E (also closely related to pathogens in SARS and MERS) based on some study, it was proven to be effectively inactivated, the virus gnomes was destroyed and the ability to mutate is prevented. This is conducted on copper alloy surface. Yes, many other metals are unfortunately become a good place for bacteria, like stainless steel and aluminium, and these materials are more preferred in modern times by architects and designers for maybe, cost and aesthetic purposes. But since we are in, and more likely to have some form of pandemic in the future, the 'small things' like this could be a good consideration. I believe couple of years ago a hospital in Germany had gone to do a major installation of copper for items that have high touch traffic, like switches, handles etc for just this purpose.

But as said, there are so many unknown properties for our current pandemic. Personally, I think this could drive me nutter than usual. As I had mentioned somewhere, while being a more-than-regular nut before, I became 'worse' and picked up more of all these 'Adrian Monk-y' habit based on what we were supposed to do during SARS time. I was a resident in quite badly hit countries, and had exercised all this precautions, but until now, more than a decade later, I probably only dropped less than 10% of the habits.

Now that the world has justifies and intensifies with what I do, I could only imagine what is left and what I have learned after this, I would probably go super nut and even more repulsed by human touch, and changing everything to copper might be high in my list. Nut-terrr

 

P.S: any chance that German Wiki is also written by Mycroft?

 

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Mycroft can learn a language in 1-2 days. Probably all Wikipedia is written by him.

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