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5 hours ago, Carol the Dabbler said:

Thanks for sharing your personal experience!  I may try Word Trip after all.  (I'm always a bit leery of getting into something that's hard to get out of.)  But you say that you "had" the game on your phone -- why the past tense?

Once I found some other games, I stopped playing it, so deleted it just to keep from cluttering up my phone. I got to something like level 400 before I lost interest.

5 hours ago, Carol the Dabbler said:

(In fact, I've found that the easiest way to deal with the ads in my solitaire game is to close the game and reload it -- just a swipe and a click as opposed to figuring out where they've hidden the tiny exit "X" this time.)

Same here. :smile:

5 hours ago, Carol the Dabbler said:

(I'm always a bit leery of getting into something that's hard to get out of.) 

I was too at first, but once I tried it, and realized how simple it was to delete them, I stopped worrying.

The one I'm enjoying most right now is Get It Right -- you put colored balls in holes, but you have to figure out the correct sequence from the clues. Doesn't sound (or look) like much, but apparently it's just the right amount of challenge for me.

And a word game I was pleased to find had less ads than others is called CodyCross. You type in answers to clues, and some of the letters line up to form another phrase. Kind of clever.

Oh, and a cute one is Haru Slide, which is essentially Tetris, but with cats. They meow. :D (But you can turn the sound off.) Pretty repetitious, but I get a kick out of it.

The biggest problem with one like I Love Hue is grabbing the correct piece sometimes ... as the levels get harder, the pieces start to get smaller, and it's easy to grab the wrong one. But if you don't care what your score is, it's not that big a deal. At first I was trying to beat the average on every game, but I've stopped caring; I just enjoy the patterns. The one I really liked (but finished all the levels, so it's gone) was just called, I think, Color Puzzle. Some of the puzzles were gorgeous. I actually took photos of some of them. :D 

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The Sherlock game very much relies on audio, first because there are video clips in between the puzzles and second because there are *audio* puzzles among the mix. So yeah, not for situations where you can't un-mute or use headphones.

Switchcraft, uh, how to explain a match-3? There's a site for this one but it only shows up in German for me, sorry: https://wooga.helpshift.com/hc/de/35-switchcraft/faq/2910-what-is-switchcraft/ . Scroll to the second pic, that's what the game levels look like - you keep swapping two neighboring pieces to get three or more of the same color in a row or block, which makes them vanish and/or spawn a special piece. You only have a limited number of these swaps, which is where the difficulty comes into play.

Mahjong is a classic tile-based game from China. Lots of versions of that one.

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On 1/26/2022 at 5:24 PM, Caya said:

you keep swapping two neighboring pieces to get three or more of the same color in a row or block

Ah, gotcha!  It's a bubble sort.

 

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  • 1 month later...

This suddenly struck me as a bit odd, so I looked up some statistics, and now it seems even odder!

The names "Jewel" and "Jewell" were given to both boy and girl babies in the US, back around a hundred years ago.  The double-L spelling for boys was the least popular of the four possibilities, never getting much higher than 500th, or about 1 per 10,000 born in the 1910's, and was pretty much never used after that.  Single-L "Jewel" for girls was the most common, but it reached only about 200th, or about 1 per 1,000.

There's a medium-sized cemetery (3-4,000 graves) here in Indiana where at least two of the men are Jewells born in the 1910s -- so perhaps the name was a bit more common in this state or in that particular town than elsewhere in the country.  But the reason I'm aware of those two men is that I knew both of them -- the only two Jewel(l)s (male or female) that I've ever known, and they're buried in the same cemetery.  As far as I'm aware, they were not related.

OK, I just searched that cemetery for people named Jewell (first or middle name), and found four more born in the 1910s (plus one born in 1897).  ALL of them were men.  So apparently naming boy babies "Jewell" was a local thing back in the 1910s.  In that cemetery, it was about 1 per 540 of everybody, not just those born in the 1910s.  Maybe there was a prominent local man by that name?

So I checked another cemetery, about ten miles away.  Out of about 5,000 graves, there are 4 women named Jewell, plus 2 men, one born in the 1910s and the other most likely born in the 1890s (exact date unknown).  So that's 1 in 5,000 versus 1 in 540.  And a 3-4,000-grave cemetery about ten miles in the other direction has two women named Jewell but no men at all.  So yeah, must have been a VERY local thing!

Still odd, though, that I should be personally acquainted with two of the six buried in that one cemetery.

 

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14 hours ago, Carol the Dabbler said:

This suddenly struck me as a bit odd, so I looked up some statistics, and now it seems even odder!

The names "Jewel" and "Jewell" were given to both boy and girl babies in the US, back around a hundred years ago.  The double-L spelling for boys was the least popular of the four possibilities, never getting much higher than 500th, or about 1 per 10,000 born in the 1910's, and was pretty much never used after that.  Single-L "Jewel" for girls was the most common, but it reached only about 200th, or about 1 per 1,000.

There's a medium-sized cemetery (3-4,000 graves) here in Indiana where at least two of the men are Jewells born in the 1910s -- so perhaps the name was a bit more common in this state or in that particular town than elsewhere in the country.  But the reason I'm aware of those two men is that I knew both of them -- the only two Jewel(l)s (male or female) that I've ever known, and they're buried in the same cemetery.  As far as I'm aware, they were not related.

OK, I just searched that cemetery for people named Jewell (first or middle name), and found four more born in the 1910s (plus one born in 1897).  ALL of them were men.  So apparently naming boy babies "Jewell" was a local thing back in the 1910s.  In that cemetery, it was about 1 per 540 of everybody, not just those born in the 1910s.  Maybe there was a prominent local man by that name?

So I checked another cemetery, about ten miles away.  Out of about 5,000 graves, there are 4 women named Jewell, plus 2 men, one born in the 1910s and the other most likely born in the 1890s (exact date unknown).  So that's 1 in 5,000 versus 1 in 540.  And a 3-4,000-grave cemetery about ten miles in the other direction has two women named Jewell but no men at all.  So yeah, must have been a VERY local thing!

Still odd, though, that I should be personally acquainted with two of the six buried in that one cemetery.

 

It's very cool information, Carol. 

But how on earth did you come up with that topic and actually checked the cemetery?

I mean... I have many odd ideas and known for starting to laugh randomly at midnight during my uni, but this... :whistle:

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2 hours ago, Van Buren Supernova said:

how on earth did you come up with that topic and actually checked the cemetery?

Oh, sorry, should have mentioned that there's a website called Find A Grave.  I think it started out listing where famous people are buried -- just in case you might want to leave a rose on William Shakespeare's grave [link], for example.  But then people liked the idea and wanted to add Grandma's grave, so it's becoming a useful site for genealogical purposes.

It's like Wikipedia in that anyone can join, and any member can add information.  It's not *just* where the graves are, though, there's almost always a bit of information about the person, minimally what's on their gravestone (if they have one), but there are also provisions for linking to any relatives who are also listed, posting photos of the person and/or their gravestone, adding a brief biography (usually their obituary), etc.

I don't recall how I found the site or why I joined, but it's one of the things I currently dabble in.

 

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I've only known one female Jewell. She lives in my community, went to the same church I attended and she's the sweetest person in the world. She in her 80's now. I've never met any male Jewells but my brother's middle name, which he goes by, is Ewell. He was named after an old baseball player named Ewell Blackwell. I thought it interesting that the names are so similar with no connection between them.

It is odd that you should know two out of the six.

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11 hours ago, kimber8ada said:

I've only known one female Jewell. She lives in my community, went to the same church I attended and she's the sweetest person in the world. She in her 80's now.

Considering her current age, she was probably named for her aunt or her grandmother.

11 hours ago, kimber8ada said:

I thought it interesting that the names are so similar with no connection between them.

Yes, that sort of thing is intriguing.  There's a Japanese name "Tami" that is pronounced about like "Tommy" is in the US and spelled like a variation of "Tammy."

Then there are names that don't look or sound much alike but really are related -- like "William" and its Spanish equivalent "Guillermo" (pronounced more or less "gee YEHR moh" (with a hard "g" as in "get").

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

Recently I rekindle (PUN!) my love for reading.

I used to love it, I have couple of walls filled with books (with a very good chunk of unread ones). When I moved almost a decade ago I was gifted a Kindle with plenty of ebooks. I still pick up books here and there but it was never at the same capacity, I'm more distracted with many other things. But now, I am back!

Any readers here? Genre?

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8 hours ago, Van Buren Supernova said:

Recently I rekindle (PUN!) my love for reading.

Good one, VBS!

8 hours ago, Van Buren Supernova said:

Any readers here? Genre?

I read a lot these days, mostly online, but I'm also getting back into printed material.  The last magazine I was subscribing to recently stopped publishing (without even telling me!), so that leaves books, and (like you) I still have a bunch from pre-internet days, which I'm slowly sorting through, weeding out, organizing, and sometimes re-reading.

My husband and I enjoy reading aloud to each other (well, mostly he enjoys me reading to him, though he did read the entire Lord of the Rings to me just a few years ago), and most of that is mystery novels -- preferably with no graphic violence, and preferably with a bit of humor.  The most recent books we've read were sequels to The No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency (fairly gentle stories set in Botswana -- I'd advise anyone who's interested to start with that first one) and the Enola Holmes novels (all those currently available in paperback).  We also like Rex Stout's Nero Wolfe novels, which we find quite re-readable.

When I'm reading by myself, I'm considerably more eclectic, including a fair assortment of non-fiction.

 

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I read all of the books by Rick Riordan so more than 20 fantasy books.

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  • 4 weeks later...
On 3/26/2022 at 12:43 AM, Carol the Dabbler said:

though he did read the entire Lord of the Rings to me just a few years ago), and most of that is mystery novels

He did what??? That is.. dedication!

On 3/26/2022 at 1:59 AM, Fantasy Lover said:

I read all of the books by Rick Riordan so more than 20 fantasy books.

It's certainly very fitting with your user name. Do you like other Fantasy books?
Personally, I'm not really into Fantasy, but I do like The Song of Ice and Fire, although I don't really categorize it as Fantasy as there is a lot of realism in them with some sprinkle of magic and dragons. Harry Potter is okay for me and once in a while I enjoy those like Miss Peregrine's.

My favorite genre is Scifi, but not those hard space cowboy or alien scifi, I think the more accurate category would be Speculative Fiction in Dystopian category, and I picked my recent books from Goodreads suggestions (based on previous books that I read). 


The latest I read was 1984 by George Orwell. It's really embarrassing, I thought I was reading Animal Farm (by the same author). I chose AF because I thought it is a 'lighter' read, I would like to read 1984 someday, but not now, as I feel depressed enough with the current world situation, but I have to admit 1984 being banned made me curious. Still, I wouldn't want to read it too soon.
So there I was, happily thinking I read Animal Farm, and until I had finished the book and wrote the review, I went on to read others' reviews and found out we were not talking about the same book! And I had, indeed, read 1984. No wonder it was so depressing. I won't re-read it again as it's exhausting, but it's a brilliant book.

Before that, I had just finished reading Fahrenheit 451 and The Giver, Goodreads seems to give me great recommendations but I need to look for something lighter, unfortunatelu my kindle library is limited to older books.

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I used to like Harry Potter, the Twilight saga, the hunger games trilogy, the divergent trilogy, the maze runner trilogy and the Lord of the rings trilogy.

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6 hours ago, Van Buren Supernova said:

He did what??? That is.. dedication!

It was the only sensible way to handle it, actually.  The Hobbit movies were being made, and we wanted to reread the book before seeing the movies, so I read it aloud and we discussed it as we went along.  When we were done with that, he wanted to continue with LotR, which I consider a bit tedious, so I said fine, if you do the reading.  It was actually kind of fun that way.

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  • 1 month later...

Hey, where is everybody?  Our electricity was out for a day and a half, and when it came back on I checked the forum expecting that I had missed some stuff.

Our typical power outages last two or three hours, but this time there was a derecho (a storm front of unusually strong winds) that knocked down numerous trees, including many that fell on electric lines.  Our local rural electric co-op had to restore electric service to about 20% of its customers.  Fortunately Alex and I didn't lose any trees, but a large shrub in our yard looks like it got run over by a gravel truck.

Alex had walked down to get the mail (the boxes are at the entrance to our development, a mile from our house).  He encountered some rain on the way down, but about the time he got to the mailbox, the wind started.  On the way back, he had to detour around numerous fallen trees, got blown off the road a few times, and got soaked to the skin.  But he made it back in one piece, thank goodness!

One thing about a power outage in a rural area is that your plumbing doesn't work, because the pump at the bottom of your well runs on electricity.  We've started to think about having a generator installed.

 

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I'm here as well, I'm going to have my birthday party this evening.

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Happy birthday! :bdaybanner:

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Happy birthday, FL!  Hope you have a great party.

Thanks, Kim, and I'm glad Alex wasn't hurt!  I forgot to mention that a farm just down the road lost their brand-new pole barn -- it's now just a pile of rubble.  So a lot of people were lucky that no one was hurt.

 

 

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 5/26/2022 at 1:26 AM, Carol the Dabbler said:

One thing about a power outage in a rural area is that your plumbing doesn't work, because the pump at the bottom of your well runs on electricity.  We've started to think about having a generator installed.

  

On 12/17/2016 at 3:54 AM, T.o.b.y said:

Also be prepared and keep a stash of large water bottles in the basement.


That also occurred to me, so there are now a dozen one-gallon (roughly four-liter) jugs of water down in ours.  That should be enough for close to a week if we don't flush until it's absolutely necessary.

We routinely have large jugs of drinking water in the house, so that was already taken care of.

 

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On 5/26/2022 at 1:26 AM, Carol the Dabbler said:

Hey, where is everybody?  Our electricity was out for a day and a half, and when it came back on I checked the forum expecting that I had missed some stuff.

Our typical power outages last two or three hours, but this time there was a derecho (a storm front of unusually strong winds) that knocked down numerous trees, including many that fell on electric lines.  Our local rural electric co-op had to restore electric service to about 20% of its customers.  Fortunately Alex and I didn't lose any trees, but a large shrub in our yard looks like it got run over by a gravel truck.

Alex had walked down to get the mail (the boxes are at the entrance to our development, a mile from our house).  He encountered some rain on the way down, but about the time he got to the mailbox, the wind started.  On the way back, he had to detour around numerous fallen trees, got blown off the road a few times, and got soaked to the skin.  But he made it back in one piece, thank goodness!

One thing about a power outage in a rural area is that your plumbing doesn't work, because the pump at the bottom of your well runs on electricity.  We've started to think about having a generator installed.

 

Wow, I wonder if that was related to the storm that went through here about the same time. I was driving when it hit; terrifying. A couple of times I thought my car might get blown off the road. But as far as I know no one was hurt, even though tons of trees went down. One was blocking my home road, but fortunately a neighbor was out with a chainsaw by the time I got there. I've still got the debris on my roof; haven't had time to deal with it.

The funny part is, the power company was out just a few days before, marking all the roads where they plan to bury the lines so they won't have so much trouble with the trees causing power outages any more. Bad timing.... all the marks were washed away. :D One step forward, one step back.......

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