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Sherlock Holmes's Birthday

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I did not know where to post this, so i made a topic. Read this in NY times.

 

http://t.co/HK2x72OuEB

 

Am i the only one who did not know this? :(

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I believe I had heard rumors, but darned if I could have told you the date.

 

Happy Birthday, Mr. Holmes!

 

 

:happybirthday:

 

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I believe I had heard rumors, but darned if I could have told you the date.

 

Happy Birthday, Mr. Holmes!

 

 

:happybirthday:

 

I think that smiley needs an ASBO. ;) 

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Yes, January 6th!  Happy Birthday Sherlock Holmes! And many many many more happy returns.

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Happy Belated Birthday :)

 

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Happy Birthday again, sir!

 

Dare I ask your age -- one hundred and ... something?  You're looking very fit!

 

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To the man who never lived, and will never die (at least anytime soon): :happybirthday:  :sherlock:  :sherlock2:  :brett:  (in all of your other variations too)!  Many Happy Returns!

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Capricorn!

 

Probably because he rejects his feelings.

 

He investigates the outside world.

 

He cannot stand stupid people.

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January 6th seems to me to be the best and only possible birthday for Sherlock Holmes.  It is 'Twelfth Night', yes, and there is textual evidence to support Sherlock being fonder of that Shakespeare play than any others.

 

But for those like me who follow the church liturgical calendar . . January 6th has a very special meaning.  It is the Feast of the Epiphany, celebrating the visitation of the Magi to the Christ Child with their gifts.  The Child that was sent to be 'a Light to Lighten the Gentiles', which the Magi represented.  Now we know that Sherlock Holmes is not a 'religious' man in the conventional sense but 'epiphany' is also defined as 'the appearance of a divine or supernatural being' and also as 'a moment of sudden inspiration or insight'.  I'd say the first describes Holmes's singular intellectual powers and the second often described his method of deduction.  So voila!  And yes, the hard-headed Ram of Capricorn is also deeply appropriate.

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Christopher Morley suggested 1854 as the year of Holmes birth but I have to say that Laurie King does, for me, give a pretty decent arguement for 1861 based on the date of The Second Afghan War that Watson was invalided home from.

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Christopher Morley suggested 1854 as the year of Holmes birth but I have to say that Laurie King does, for me, give a pretty decent arguement for 1861 based on the date of The Second Afghan War that Watson was invalided home from.

 

Actually, with respect, I think the historical dates of the Second Afghan War bolster the argument for Mr. Morley and Mr. Baring-Gould's 1854 birth year for Holmes.  The war lasted from 1878 -1880, with the disastrous Battle of Maiwand occurring 27 July 1880.   We know that Doctor Watson was back home in London some months later and met Sherlock Holmes in the New Year, 1881.  If we take Mrs. King's birthdate of 1861, then that means that SH would have been some days shy of his 20th birthday on January 1, 1881.  Sherlock was a prodigy but seeing as he spent nearly three years in the pursuit of university studies and had a period of time after that on his own in digs in Montague Street, 20 years of age is too young to have done all that and already have built some reputation as a consulting detective.  If he were nearly 27, though, it is possible.

 

Doctor Watson did the full medical degree plus additional training for Army surgeons plus a year in uniform before returning home to London with his health irretrievably ruined.  It is suggested that he was about 18 months older than Holmes, making him 28 and a half when he meets his new flatmate.  We might be able to shave a year off that possibly but again, were Watson still in his early 20s in 1881, he wouldn't have had time to qualify as a doctor and also serve in uniform.

 

Easier to say that Laurie fudged her dates for her own purposes.  A Holmes of 50, 51 is a more plausible potential romantic object for a teenage girl than one nearer 60. 

 

Anyway, according to the Ur-text, Holmes is 'a man of 60' when undertaking his last canonical case for the Crown on the eve of WWI in 1914.  That is as solid as it gets.

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Christopher Morley suggested 1854 as the year of Holmes birth but I have to say that Laurie King does, for me, give a pretty decent arguement for 1861 based on the date of The Second Afghan War that Watson was invalided home from.

Actually, with respect, I think the historical dates of the Second Afghan War bolster the argument for Mr. Morley and Mr. Baring-Gould's 1854 birth year for Holmes. The war lasted from 1878 -1880, with the disastrous Battle of Maiwand occurring 27 July 1880. We know that Doctor Watson was back home in London some months later and met Sherlock Holmes in the New Year, 1881. If we take Mrs. King's birthdate of 1861, then that means that SH would have been some days shy of his 20th birthday on January 1, 1881. Sherlock was a prodigy but seeing as he spent nearly three years in the pursuit of university studies and had a period of time after that on his own in digs in Montague Street, 20 years of age is too young to have done all that and already have built some reputation as a consulting detective. If he were nearly 27, though, it is possible.

 

Doctor Watson did the full medical degree plus additional training for Army surgeons plus a year in uniform before returning home to London with his health irretrievably ruined. It is suggested that he was about 18 months older than Holmes, making him 28 and a half when he meets his new flatmate. We might be able to shave a year off that possibly but again, were Watson still in his early 20s in 1881, he wouldn't have had time to qualify as a doctor and also serve in uniform.

 

Easier to say that Laurie fudged her dates for her own purposes. A Holmes of 50, 51 is a more plausible potential romantic object for a teenage girl than one nearer 60.

 

Anyway, according to the Ur-text, Holmes is 'a man of 60' when undertaking his last canonical case for the Crown on the eve of WWI in 1914. That is as solid as it gets.

I’m more than a little ashamed of myself for that last post. It’s a lesson for me in not making a post just because you have 2 minutes to spare outside a hospital and you haven’t sorted the facts out in your head first! I only read of King’s proposed date this morning and for some inexplicable reason I read 1861 as if it was 1851. To compound this error I got the date of The Second Afghan War wrong in my head! So stupidly I thought that she was suggesting Holmes was 3 years older than previously proposed.

 

You’re absolutely correct Hikari it looks like King is doing a bit of ‘manipulation.’

 

I don’t mind making mistakes (we all do occasionally) but not howlers like that one.

 

Lesson learned I hope: engage ageing brain first then type.

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Interesting Tumblr post on the topic.

 

Excerpt:

 

tumblr_inline_my36cdVyEg1qiv5yk.png

 

tumblr_mxs9wswBLO1s28g6jo2_1280.jpg

 

Note the bottom. Birth year is 1977. In this font, I can’t think of any other digit that would partially look like this, is repeated and gives credible birth year. This, for me, settles the age debate.

 

 

 

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This hard-headed Aries only knows that a Capricorn is a sea-goat, not a ram. I imagine we would still enjoy butting heads, though. :p

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^ It took all of this Capricorn's strength not to correct that when I saw it, lol.  I don't wish to become an "Actually..." person around here, lol.

 

 

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This hard-headed Aries only knows that a Capricorn is a sea-goat, not a ram. I imagine we would still enjoy butting heads, though. :p

If you're talking about something in that headstone quote, I'm not finding it, even after following the link. [we need a head-scratching emotie around here]

 

^ It took all of this Capricorn's strength not to correct that when I saw it, lol.  I don't wish to become an "Actually..." person around here, lol.

Don't worry -- I've already got that position pretty well tied up! ;)

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If you're talking about something in that headstone quote, I'm not finding it, even after following the link. [we need a head-scratching emotie around here]

Unless I am grossly mistaken, she was talking about this:

 

And yes, the hard-headed Ram of Capricorn is also deeply appropriate.

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Yup, and don't feel bad Carol, I knew what I meant, and I couldn't find the quote I was referring to either! You're absolutely right, we need a head-scratching emotie.... or we can just recruit Artemis to explain everything to us.... :p

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:P

 

 

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This hard-headed Aries only knows that a Capricorn is a sea-goat, not a ram. I imagine we would still enjoy butting heads, though. :P

 

It appears that I have confused my astrological Ovis aries with my Bovidae.  Deepest apologies.

 

Please be gentle with me--I am a delicate scientific instrument without natural defenses.

 

It seems to me that Sherlock Holmes should have shared my sign of Libra.  It is, after all, the only inanimate object in the Zodiac--we are sensitive instruments that don't respond well to grit . . or criticism, especially of our intellects.  But if you want to know how much something weighs, you've come to the right place!

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I was unsure where to post this (so moderators feel free to relocate). Im a day early as I wanted to be the first to wish Sherlock Holmes a Happy 164th Birthday tomorrow.

 

I’m sure the most posters will be aware of this famous sonnet ‘221b’ written by the late and eminent Sherlockian Vincent Starrett (Who by the way also wrote one of the best Holmes pastiches ever, The Adventure Of The Unique Hamlet.)

 

This is a link to the written version (I can’t post the actual one as I don’t know how to reduce the file size)

 

https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=starrett+sonnet&rlz=1C9BKJA_enGB704GB704&oq=starrett+&aqs=chrome.0.69i59j69i57j0l2j69i60l2.4213j0j8&hl=en-GB&sourceid=chrome-mobile&ie=UTF-8#imgrc=LI_Yn92npe6NWM:

 

These are two spoken versions. I’m unsure about the first one but it may be Starrett himself. The second one, fittingly, is read by Basil Rathbone.

 

https://youtu.be/WKoQ-PdF8QQ

 

https://youtu.be/b_Fn7LZGiYo

 

Happy Birthday my dear Holmes

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I second that, heartily, with toasts all around.

 

Then we shall engage in a venerable American drinking game called '164 Bottles of Beer on the Wall'.  We can change it to Bottles of Port because I don't think Mr Holmes cares for beer.

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