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And whip out fan art, I've already vented my spleen on that. 

It's far from the hardest job in the world, but yea I imagine it's pretty draining. 

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I think I would rather work in a mine than do this.
The noise, the people!

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I'd hate it too, but they know what they're in for. And at least they don't have anyone's life in their hands. I think when you get to a certain level of fame it must be possible to step back from all that bumf if you really want to. Aside from press junkets I don't think I've seen any Brad Pitt chat show interviews for example. There must be some out there from what he was younger but he's not known for it, where as BC always seems to be on something. I'd be at Martin levels of nasty within a couple of days. 

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Yeah, I think they get some say on how much they're willing to put themselves out there for the fans. Some.

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I think when they're starting out they pretty much have to do what they're told - of course at that point no one is that thrilled to see them anyway. But with fame must come the power to say no, at least to some extent. 

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Swirly. :D

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Much more flamboyant than just shrugging it on. The only problem is that it's hard to do in narrow corridors. (Or submarines).

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And planes. 

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That kind of ‘dramatic effect’ reminds me a little of Brett.👍

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22 minutes ago, Caya said:

According to witnesses, he dragged the four muggers off the victim, who was in his 20s, after screaming at them to leave him alone. One of the men had tried to steal the cyclist’s bike, but nothing was stolen.

Responding to reports of his heroics Cumberbatch, told The Sun  newspaper  “I did it out of, well, I had to, you know...”

Uber driver Manuel Dias said the cyclist was lucky, and described Cumberbatch as a “superhero”.

Mr Dias, 53, said he was driving the actor and his wife, Sophie Hunter, but said he only recognised it was Cumberbatch when he was out of his car.

Mr Dias, who also tried to help the victim, said: “Then it all got a bit surreal. Here was Sherlock Holmes fighting off four attackers just round the corner from Baker Street.

“I had hold of one lad and Benedict another. He seemed to know exactly what he was doing. He was very brave. He did most of it, to be honest.

“They tried to hit him but he defended himself and pushed them away.  Then I think they also recognised it was Benedict and ran away.”  No arrests have been made.

*******

Things I Learned About Benedict Cumberbatch:

1.  Despite being one of the top movie stars in the world, he takes Uber.  :)

2.  His innate modesty renders him inarticulate under direct praise.  "I did it out of, well, I had to, you know. . ." :)   I knew that already, but it's been confirmed again.

3 He doesn't just do baritsu for show.  SH is a bad-ass and so is BC, apparently.   Keeping himself fit, it sounds like.

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1 hour ago, Hikari said:

1.  Despite being one of the top movie stars in the world, he takes Uber. 

I take it that's one of those advertisement-bedecked taxi companies!  Hey, black cabs are boring!

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Uber (like Lyft) is a company that contracts average Joes and their cars to use as a taxi. A person uses an app on their smartphone to request a driver. The thing with being a driver for this service, you spend more on the wear and tear of the car than you make.

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http://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz/article-4917040/BBC-viewers-blast-Child-Time-s-unrealistic-plot.html

This article was published last September with the premiere of BC's project A Child in Time, based on the novel by Ian McEwan.  Viewer reaction seemed scathing, based on this, and I wondered if Benedict had truly been involved with such a flop . . and what the plot elements leading to 'blasting' by BBC viewers as 'unrealistic' and 'garbage' might be.  It's unheard of for Ben to come in for such negative criticism for his work.  Although it must be said that he personally does not--his central performance being outstanding is one of the few things the majority of viewers agreed upon.

Life moved on and I sort of forgot about it, until I found this DVD on our New Releases shelf and took it home.  I watched it last night.  While by no means as poorly executed as Season 3 of Outlander, which was also in my viewing pile, I can now understand some of the harsh criticisms directed at ACiT.  Without faulting the actors or the production design, I have to say that I find this 90-min telefilm a superficial mess as an adaptation.  I haven't read the McEwan novel, but even so, it was apparent that quite a few crucial parts have been excised from the screenplay. 

Ben plays Steven Lewis (incidentally, at least the third time he has portrayed a character named Steven, cf. Hawking and The Last Enemy), a successful London-based author of children's picture books who lives every parent's worst nightmare when his 4-year-old daughter disappears during a trip to the supermarket.  The story is not a police procedural about the search for the missing child, however.  Except for a few minutes at the start, the police are not involved at all. The story focuses on the grief of the two parents, who finds their marriage torn apart by the strain and the recrimination.  Kelly Macdonald portrays Steven's wife, Julie, who moves out of their expensive London home into a cottage by the sea because she can't cope with being surrounded by reminders of her lost daughter.  We follow Steven's grief and his attempts to keep looking for his child (via the rather ineffectual method of hand-lettered flyers on lampposts--"She's not a puppy, ' says Julie, bitterly.)  One wonders what the heck the police are doing because it seems to be nothing.  Despite his ongoing grief which manifests itself in frequent visual and aural hallucinations of his child, Katie, Steven seems to all appearances to carry on with his life undisturbed, apart from the departure of his wife.  Steven sits on a governmental committee working to devise a handbook of best practices in child-rearing intended for the citizens of Great Britain--the Nanny State acting quite literally as a nanny.  Meetings drag on, dragging the energy level of the film down with these tedious segments.  Then there is a bizarre subplot involving Steven's editor and best friend, who also serves on the committee undergoing what can only be termed a psychotic break, regressing to childhood and living in the woods as a one-man version of Lord of the Flies.  There has obviously been a crucial piece of the book left out regarding this man in crisis, because it is nearly incomprehensible.  While all this is going on, the missing little girl seems to get lost again altogether.  Kelly M.'s role as Julie is quite small, since she and Ben have only a few scenes together, as the piece is almost completely from the father's perspective. 

For the Benedict completist, this is worth a look-see for his work here but this script has some serious flaws.  Prepare to be aggravated and confused before it is over.  It may be been better done as a two or three-part miniseries to pick up some of these loose threads.  Also I wouldn't say that Ben is looking his best in it, either.  I miss Sherlock.

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5 hours ago, Caya said:

Oh Benny, just when I thought my fannish admiration for you might be starting to wane.....

Although probably not, since this was the first item on my newsfeed this evening.... :blush: 

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3 hours ago, SherlockedCAMPer said:

Uber (like Lyft) is a company that contracts average Joes and their cars to use as a taxi. A person uses an app on their smartphone to request a driver. The thing with being a driver for this service, you spend more on the wear and tear of the car than you make.

I can believe that -- my brother had the same problem when he was leasing his truck (and his own driving services) to a company that arranged loads for him to haul.  He finally sold the truck and got a job driving for one of the big freight companies.

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Ahhh, this is the kind of interview I love. Actors interviewing actors about acting. Claire Foy and BC. Mostly about The Crown and Patrick Melrose.

 

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Another insider-ish interview with BC. https://deadline.com/2018/06/benedict-cumberbatch-patrick-melrose-finale-interview-sherlock-doctor-strange-update-video-1202405561/

Mostly about Patrick Melrose, of course. At least the guy asked about Sherlock, even if he didn't get much of an answer.

Also I note there is going to be a prequel series for Game of Thrones, even though there's been no ending yet. :wtf: 

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As for Child: I had the unnerving impression that the film left out almost all crucial moments of the story, leaving us with the phases between them. Also the symbolic time-thing seemed a bit incomplete, as if they tried to show us something and dropped the idea half way. But maybe it's only me. I wasn't that much moved by Patric Melrose either.

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15 hours ago, J.P. said:

I think it's a bit overdue:

 

And for completists like me, here is BC's acceptance speech. I suddenly understand why he entertained the thought of law school.

In two parts. Skip to 7:50 on Part I to avoid repeating Hiddle's intro.

Part II:

 

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