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Lestrade pronounciation

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I came across one message board on this subject and someone noted in at least one movie Holmes used both pronunciations interchangeably.

Maybe he pronounced it the wrong way when he was peeved with the Inspector, just to annoy him.
I've got another one now - Watson pronounced it as 'Le-stray-ed' in Sherlock Holmes And The Case Of The Silk Stocking (2004, Rupert Everett)! :D
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Just starting to see adverts for that movie around.....will have to check up on that. Didn't know it was that old.

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Just starting to see adverts for that movie around.....will have to check up on that. Didn't know it was that old.

It's quite a good movie. I have it on DVD.

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Got another interesting one: Basil Rathbone's version says "Les-trah-d".

 

:P

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I came across one message board on this subject and someone noted in at least one movie Holmes used both pronunciations interchangeably.

Actually, you're right there: in some of the Basil Rathbone movies, he says the name Lestrade both ways.

 

In the Ronald Howard episodes of the 1950s, he says "Lestrayde". So does Peter Cushing.

 

I love noticing these things! :P

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If he comes from Scotland, then JB is right, because of the whole Huguenot connection, when they were forced to flee France when Louis xiv revoked the Edict of Nantes and sent them to Britain, Switzerland, the Netherlands and the Protestant German principalities. If his ancestry is more recently French, then BC is right, because that would be the proper French pronunciation, although it has no corresponding actual meaning in French. Still, pretty affected on the part of Curly mop!

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Speaking of alternative pronunciations, how about the name of Marylebone Road, where John and Mary were having their (attempted) engagement dinner?  The Holmes brothers pronounce it differently.  I'm trying to recall exactly how, but I believe Mycroft says something like "Mah-ry-le-bone" and Sherlock says "Meh-ry-le-bone."  Or however one might transcribe that in British.  I was already under the impression that there IS no correct pronunciation for that name, so maybe I was right!

 

Sorry, Carol, had to watch TEH to make doubly sure: in his completely enclosed office, where he sits in front of my absolute favourite reproduction of the Queen's portrait in gorgeous Order of the Garter dress, Mycroft makes it sound more like an actual Mary... while during his investigation with Molly Sherlock says Mah ... And now I shall need to find out what school Mr Gatiss went to, because for BC, I know. IMDB probably my best bet.

 

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Yesterday I found a record of BC reading one of the ACD stories on YouTube. He pronounced the name Lestrade as "less trade" there.

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Yeah, I  think that's the one I mentioned pages back!

 

Surely it has to be leSTRARD of the YARD?

Lestrayed, just doesn't work!

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Surely it has to be leSTRARD of the YARD?

 

You do realize that's a phonetic spelling only in non-rhotic areas?   ;)   (In most of the US, Lestrade does not rhyme with Yard!)

 

The first time I ran across that sort of British phonetic spelling, I wondered why the heck you folks would pronounce the word with an R-sound -- but then I actually thought about it, and realized that "ar" is apparently your version of what we'd spell phonetically as "ah" -- as in "leSTRAHD."

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I don't think that there's a definate pronunciation. Obviously there's a recording of Doyle speaking but he doesn't say Lestrade unfortunately. Brett used Lestrayed while Rathbone used Lestrard. I was just messing around with an English to French online translator and typed in 'Les trade.' Unsurprisingly it came up as 'the trade.' Its a pure coincidence of course but you often hear tv police officers calling their work 'the job.'

There was also no mention of Lestrade's Christian name in the canon but in some Holmes pastiches I've seen it referred to as George and Sholto.

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Bit more info.

 

Doyle got the name from a fellow Edinburgh student called Joseph Alexander Lestrade. Lestrade is a village in the mid-Pyrenees (I don't know how to put accents over letters, sorry) Apparently L'estrade means 'raised platform.'

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I don't think that there's a definate pronunciation. Obviously there's a recording of Doyle speaking but he doesn't say Lestrade unfortunately. Brett used Lestrayed while Rathbone used Lestrard. I was just messing around with an English to French online translator and typed in 'Les trade.' Unsurprisingly it came up as 'the trade.' Its a pure coincidence of course but you often hear tv police officers calling their work 'the job.'

There was also no mention of Lestrade's Christian name in the canon but in some Holmes pastiches I've seen it referred to as George and Sholto.

 

It's apparently like a lot of other surnames -- the correct pronunciation depends on where you're from and where your ancestors came from.  So we'd have to know how the "real" Lestrade pronounced his name, or failing that, how Conan Doyle said it -- and apparently we don't know either one.  I've read (earlier in this thread?) that the native London pronunciation is lestrayed (as though the word were English), whereas the original French pronunciation must be more like lestrahd.  Too bad that Greg never (to my recollection) says his own last name (other than in the pilot, where he pronounced it the same way Sherlock does) -- not that that would prove anything about the canonical Lestrade, of course.  (I assume you come from a non-rhotic area, and are using "lestrard" to represent the pronunciation used in BBC Sherlock, which I am rendering as "lestrahd.")

 

Odd that anyone would say his given name is Sholto, considering that in one story (had to look it up -- The Cardboard Box) he signs a note "G. Lestrade" -- thus all the screen Georges and Gareths and Gregs and so on.  Also odd in view of there being a character in Sign of the Four whose surname is Sholto.

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The name Sholto was used by MJ Trow in his Lestrade stories.

 

There's just no way of knowing the correct pronunciation of the name. It's down to interpretation. I've always said Lestrard because I grew up on Rathbone.

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It's also possible that the "real" Lestrade (being perhaps a Cockney) said lestrayed, but the "real" Holmes (being presumably more upper crust) called him Geoffrey lestrahd.

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That certainly makes sense Carol.

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Odd that anyone would say his given name is Sholto, considering that in one story (had to look it up -- The Cardboard Box) he signs a note "G. Lestrade" -- thus all the screen Georges and Gareths and Gregs and so on....

 

Finally I understand why "our" Sherlock is never able to remember Lestrade's first name. Sneaky Moftisses! :d

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Yup, it's apparently an in-joke.

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Has anyone ever met anyone called Sholto? It would have been a bit weird if they had called him Sholto instead of Greg

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Regarding Sholto and Garrideb as surnames:

 

Whitepages.com has 8 phone listings in the US under Sholto, and of course the name may be more common in the UK.

 

They also have one listing for Garrideb (in a nice residential neighborhood). I'd be willing to bet that it's someone's version of an unlisted number. You tell all your friends that your phone is listed under Garrideb, so they'll be able to find it very easily (because it's the only one) -- but if someone calls up actually asking for the Garridebs, you say (very truthfully), "Sorry, there's no one by that name at this number." And need I add, the people with that phone are Holmes fans.

 

As for either as a given name, I have no idea. People seem to use just about anything as a name these days.

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I've just found out that 'Sholto' means 'she knows,' in Gaelic. A few names come up when you type it in but the people are all dead. You don't here of anyone these days using the name. Perhaps it's one of those names that will one day come back into usage?

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As a first name?

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Yes. For eg. there's an English pianist called Sholto Kynoch. A Basil William Sholto Mackenzie, 2nd Baron Amulree. Sholto Ainslee Fine Art Profession born 1963 and Sholto Taylor a wheelchair rugby player born in 1972. So the last 2 could still be alive.

 

The Scottish meaning apparently is 'sower.' You get the definate impression that anyone called Sholto probably had some kind of Scottish Heritage. As Doyle was Scottish it's probably from there that he came up with name.

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