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A Scandal in Bohemia


Schlauer Fuchs
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I've just finished reading the Scandal in Bohemia (my very first ACD story ^_^) and have one question: In the interviews Steven Moffat mentioned that in the ACD version, Irene Adler is killed in the end. Well, she isn't, is she? So either what I read was but one chapter of the whole Scandal in Bohemia (which I doubt) or Irene features in another Holmes story. Could you please tell me where?

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I also think she isn´t dead because I read the story as well and in the end you´re just learning that she leaved England with her husband but not that she died.

And I´ve never read about her in any other stories, so I´ve read nowhere something about her death in all ACD sories.

 

 

I hope this has helped you

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In the original story, Irene is still alive at the end of the narrative -- but Watson is apparently telling the story well after the fact, and refers to her at the end of the first paragraph as "the late Irene Adler, of dubious and questionable memory."  So although she doesn't die in the story, she has died by the time the story is told.  Considering Watson's low opinion of her, he may have intentionally waited to tell the story, in order not to reflect badly on Irene during her lifetime.

 

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Welcome to the forum, London2211!  :)  Yeah, that's exactly how the story ended in my version, too (surprise ;)). But since I hadn't read another ACD before (actually now I've already read 2  :lol:) I thought maybe her death is described in another story. You obviously know more!

 

And thanks Carol, you're completely right, he calls her the "late" Irene Adler! I had already forgotten that detail when the story suddenly ended even though I was still waiting for an account of how Sherlock couldn't safe her (because Moffat stressed in the commentary that in his version Sherlock saves her, so I always assumed she got killed in ACD's story).

Since we don't know when she died, it might also be that Watson tells the story after two years because he had promised silence until then. That'd suggest that Irene could have died young. But who knows... in your version Watson is more of a man of honour, so maybe I'll associate with your interpretation :)

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Yes, I see Conan Doyle's Watson as, above all, a man of honor -- and that seems to be his defining characteristic in most adaptations, as well.

 

Just in case anyone has a different interpretation of "man of honor" than I do, let me point out that I do NOT mean the knee-jerk type who challenges you to a duel every time you criticize him.  Rather, I mean a trustworthy fellow who would not needlessly hurt anyone's feelings -- or at least that's the part of my definition that's relevant here.

 

And welcome to the forum, london2211!  :welcome:  Thanks for jumping right in with your ideas.

 

I love your avatar picture!  :)

 

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I always thought the "late" referred to the fact that after her encounter with Mr Holmes, Irene Adler's name changed to Irene Norton because she got married.

 

If Irene ever showed up again on Sherlock, I'd love it if she was married to a woman and her last name was Norton now, too. She could still flirt with Sherlock, of course. (She should still flirt with Sherlock). And I want her to be happy. Irene Adler might not deserve happiness by some people's standards, but she sure does by mine.

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I always thought the "late" referred to the fact that after her encounter with Mr Holmes, Irene Adler's name changed to Irene Norton because she got married.

 

Sorry, but that would be "the former Irene Adler."  "The late" always means deceased.  :(

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Please note that John described Sherlock as merely "late" -- not as "the late Sherlock Holmes."

 

Mma Ramotswe, the protagonist of the No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency series of novels, often recommends that people drive cautiously rather than rushing, because "it is better to be late than the late."

 

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