Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Convict13

Peter Capaldi as Sherlock Holmes

Recommended Posts

Cute!  I see that the program aired in 1994 and 95, so no wonder Capaldi looks younger than his current Doctor.  They were apparently spoofing the Jeremy Brett series of the same era.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I actually remember the Alexei Sayle Show, not particulars, but I do remember it being on the tele.  Actually Peter cuts a nice figure as Sherlock.   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Couldn't stop laughing at this one! :lol:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

He would be a nice Sherlock, but i doubt if he would beat Cumberbatch <3 

I loved the video, sometimes it is just like this, Sherlock say something obvious, and watson got impressed, in Ellementary (the forbidden) Sherlock do Ridiculous deductions.

God, how i hate Elementary  :angry:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

He would be a nice Sherlock, but i doubt if he would beat Cumberbatch <3

I loved the video, sometimes it is just like this, Sherlock say something obvious, and watson got impressed, in Ellementary (the forbidden) Sherlock do Ridiculous deductions.

God, how i hate Elementary :angry:

I've never watched Elementary, nor do I intend to...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If I had to pick an actor to play Holmes after Brett it would have been Jonathan Hyde. He played Culverton Smith in The Dying Detective. I've always thought that he'd have made a great Rathbonian Holmes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As this thread began about a doctor who actor playing Holmes has anyone seen The Hound Of The Baskervilles with Tom Baker?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have not.  Baker plays Holmes?  If you've seen it, what do you think of it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ive got it in the collection but it took a while to acquire it. It's easily available though. It's not bad actually and Baker makes a pretty decent Holmes. He wanted to play Holmes more but, for whatever reasons, it never happened. The main criticism that I've come across, and I have to agree with it, is that it goes a bit flat when Baker isn't on screen. As you know in 'The Hound,' there's a fair period at Baskerville Hall when Holmes is absent (lurking around on the moors) and those are the weaker parts. It's definately worth a watch. It definately beats the Stewart Grainger 'Hound!'

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I haven't seen the Granger film either, but I take it you're damning Baker's version with faint praise?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I haven't seen the Granger film either, but I take it you're damning Baker's version with faint praise?

No really Carol. It's pretty decent and I think most people feel that it's a petty that Baker wasn't given another opportunity to play Holmes.

The Grainger version is pretty weak. For fans of Star Trek, Stapleton is played by Williamn Shatner. Grainger was obvious;y a well respected Hollywood actor but he didn't really suit as a white haired Holmes.

Charlton Heston also played Holmes and he was a bit better (but not much). There have been some pretty poor Holmes portrayals, often by otherwise good actors. Some just don't suit the part.

Reginald Owen and Edward Woodward were both pudgy, unconvincing Holmes'. Clive Brook (the first talking Holmes) wasn't great. Raymond Massey was poor. The worst Holmes ever though was surely Patrick Macnee in The Hounds Of London (surely the most excrable Holmes movie ever, a real Turkey!)

There have been a couple of fairly recent Holmes movies (I can't recall the titles but maybe my brain has subcontiously deleted them!) and they are truly, truly awful. Avoid at all costs awful.

Many are critical,of Matt Frewer's Holmes and I can see why. He exaggerates the accent almost to a parody but I have a bit of a soft spot for him and the 4 movies he made. The guy who played Watson was excellent (can't recall his name though. Was it Kenneth something?)

At least the poor Holmes' are more than made up for by Brett, Rathbone, Wontner, Cushing, Wilmer and of course Cumberbatch!

 

If you get chance, and haven't already, check out 'A Study In Terror.' It's a Hammer movie. Holmes vs Jack the Ripper. It's very good and John Neville is another very good Holmes (there's a cameo role for a young Barbara Windsor too.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The above post should start with 'not really.' Once you post here is there no way of editing your posts? I always spot errors too late.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you mouse-over your post, you'll see an Edit button to the left of the Quote buttons.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Carol

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If I had to pick an actor to play Holmes after Brett it would have been Jonathan Hyde. He played Culverton Smith in The Dying Detective. I've always thought that he'd have made a great Rathbonian Holmes.

 

This sounds rather dirty, innit bruv?

 

Just calling to say I lurve  . . .irritating you with your favorite phrase.  I had not visited this thread before; it was way before I joined up here.  But I'm with you about Jonathan Hyde, bruh.

 

 

Lauren Cooper Meets the Doctor

www.youtube.com/watch?v=WxB1gB6K-2A

 

A laugh, innit though?

 

If you don't think so, am I bovvered?  :)

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I’d never seen that before. Thanks for posting it Hikari

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I’d never seen that before. Thanks for posting it Hikari

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I’ve never heard of a Bow Street Lexicon to be honest Hikari? She has what we call a ‘cockney’ accent if tainted by modern ‘street’ talk. The test for being a true ‘Cockney’ in London was to be born within the sounds of Bow Bells (ie the bells of St Mary-le-Bow church). People from outside London though tend to call all Londoners ‘Cockneys’. Around 3 months ago I was sitting on a bench outside that church eating a very nice bacon and brie sandwich killing time until I went on a historical walk .

 

Chav, as you know, is a fairly new word which tends to mean working class, loud, uncultured etc. I think that Lauren would be classed as the epitome of ‘chav.’

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I’ve never heard of a Bow Street Lexicon to be honest Hikari? She has what we call a ‘cockney’ accent if tainted by modern ‘street’ talk. The test for being a true ‘Cockney’ in London was to be born within the sounds of Bow Bells (ie the bells of St Mary-le-Bow church). People from outside London though tend to call all Londoners ‘Cockneys’. Around 3 months ago I was sitting on a bench outside that church eating a very nice bacon and brie sandwich killing time until I went on a historical walk .

 

Chav, as you know, is a fairly new word which tends to mean working class, loud, uncultured etc. I think that Lauren would be classed as the epitome of ‘chav.’

 

Oh, my goodness . . in the holiday melee, I overlooked your comment here.  So sorry, innit bruv!

 

Well, you have answered my question(s).  I know there's a 'Bow Street' TV production company . . and there are a few references to 'Bow street diction' in Sherlock Holmes, though canon or pastiche, I'm not sure now.  The Bow Bells is the 'Bow' part, I'm sure.  Americans make the frequent error of assuming that the Cockney accent is an all-purpose British accent.  Or that there are basically two Brit accents:  Cockney and 'posh'. If Americans are sitting around the pub (or 'bar', in our parlance) pretending to be British after a few beers, Cockney is going to be the default attempt.  None of us want to ape Prince Charles, even when we are drunk.  David Beckham, Johnny Rotten, James Corden . . these gents say 'British' to us.  And Benedict, too, if we have taste.  :)

 

I actually ordered a button off the Internet that reads "Do British people sit around pretending to have an American accent?"  I got two--one for myself and one for a former co-worker who did a really good and ear-splitting Cockney accent.  She would have been a smashing Covent Garden flower girl in another life.  'EastEnders' all the way, baybee!  Though, her life is kind of an American version of an 'EastEnders' episode in its own way.

 

I have heard 'chav' is short for 'Council-housed and Violent'.  So I wasn't sure it would be appropriate to call Lauren Cooper a chav.  Her little friend, maybe.

 

A bacon-and-brie butty?  How very classy!  'Butty' is another term which is never used for 'sandwich' over here due to the whole 'butt' connotation.  Or would a butty be closer to a Panini?  It is a warm sandwich after all (innit bruv)?

 

At the time of Kate & Wills' wedding, I read somewhere that 'bacon butties at midnight' were on the agenda for the reception (ie, 'the night 'do, as I believe you lot call it over there) . .and all those posh young people, including the future King and Queen Consort of England were **soo excited!!**  to be having bacon butties at their wedding reception?

 

I was like, 'Really?!'  I grant you that dancing for 4-6 hours works up an appetite, even if you had a big dinner earlier, but I marveled at members of the Royal family & all their aristocratic friends being ***so thrilled*** at a chance to consume bacon butties (that's presuming that the Duchess of Cambridge ever touches bacon.  Or carbohydrates--which are assumptions I do not make).  But William and Harry and all the blokes at least were super chuffed to be getting bacon butties at this Wedding of the Century (Chas and Di's wedding having taken place in the last century).

 

So I smiled at this touching display that Royals are like real people.  Perhaps when one is heir to the crown of Great Britain, having bacon butties is as exotic as a trip to McDonald's . . .something which the commoners do all the time, but which due to one's privileged position, one is excluded from as a matter of course, unless a special effort is made to import these quaint working-class foodstuffs into one's royal life.  It's not like Wills & Harry & Kate could elbow up to the bacon butty cart in Bermondsey next to the likes of Lee and Brenda from the council flats, now innit bruv? :)

 

I made myself a bacon butty with a cuppa soup last night as a matter of fact.  It was a homey little snack and took the edge off . .wasn't up to doing a full dinner.  But if ever I have a wedding reception, bacon isn't getting anywhere near it, unless it's wrapped around some very expensive appetizers. 

 

At a recent get-together with some friends,  I happened to mention that I like some baked beans on toast under the broiler with a little cheese as a filling and cheap little meal when I don't feel like cooking.  Mate, I have to tell you that by the horrified looks I received, you would have thought I said I like to snack on a microwaved baby on toast in the evenings.  My protestations that it was actually pretty tasty were not believed.  It's not that far off from a vegetarian pizza, really but they just couldn't believe it.

 

Admittedly, the first time I heard of this concoction, I had a similar reaction.  You and your countrymen do ingest some items which are commonplace for you and horrifying-sounding to us colonials:  brains.  Kidneys.  'kippers'.  Marmalade (yuk)  Black pudding.  and le piece de resistance, 'Spotted Dick', which I know is supposed to be some sort of pudding--but you must admit it doesn't sound like dessert so much as the ravages of a social disease.  Compared with spotted dick, beans on toast is very mild and non-objectionable, but the combo does not come naturally to Americans.  Kind of like baked beans for breakfast.  Or 'black pudding'!  The key, for me, anyhow, is the bread must be firm and well-toasted and the beans drained as dry as they can be.  Even so, it gets a bit soggy before I'm finished.  Soggy is not one of my favorite textures.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One strange thing about the cockney accent is it’s representation in old movies. A case in point is the Rathbone Holmes movies. Some of the working class cockney extra speak in an accent that sounds more Australian to my ears. Dick Van Dyke in Mary Poppins is another famously bad examples.

Most people from the uk have no real idea of accents from different parts of the States. A generic ‘southern’ accent is recognisable to most of us as is a New York accent. The only other one that I can recognise is Boston (JFK of course.) I have an accent that definately couldn’t be described as posh. I was thinking of the best way to describe it to you? I was born not far from comedian Lenny Henry so my accent is similar to his although his might be a bit broader than mine.

As for food. Well you can’t beat a bacon sandwich but we Brits often go over the top by adding sausage, fried egg and mushrooms (it’s basically a portable heart attack) I’ve eaten, and like, kidneys, kippers, marmalade, black pudding and spotted dick but I’ve never had brains. The Scottish do a dish called Haggis which may not appeal to the American taste bud but I do like.

I’ve never been to the States but I have friends that have and they all told me tales of thick sandwiches, steaks the size of a mattresses and an endless supply of coffee. Talking of weird food, what about the bagel? Who would invent a sandwich with a hole in the middle?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A: Who would invent a sandwich with a hole in the middle?

Q: The Jews, of course.  God's Chosen people are well-used to dialing down their expectations.  They figured, if they put a hole in their bread themselves, that's one less thing some other hostile force could take away from them.  Maybe?

 

Or maybe it's to let the cream cheese air out.  It's just a bread donut, and you like donuts, don't you?  Or as you might spell it, doughnuts?  Or, don't tell me, doughnuts are not British but were invented by doughboys . .?  I can't actually say I've seen any of your countrymen eating donuts onscreen.  Apparently Sherlock is shown eating a mince pie in the Christmas scene of HLV, unless that didn't make it into the final cut.  I thought Benedict was eating a thick shortbread cookie--that's what it looked like.  Your 'pies' are all held-in-the-hand single serve ones, more like what we'd call a tart, I guess.  Say 'pie' and most people here are going to assume you mean a large round object in a baking tin big enough to be cut into slices for 8 people.  We eat our pie by the slab, bruh!

 

'Steaks the size of mattresses'! LOL . . well, I guess.  We have a LOT of grazing land here.  Our portions are out of control.  The average meal in an American restaurant would comfortably feed at least 2.5 British people or a Japanese family of 4.  It's monstrous.  I noted you kindly did not say that your friends talked of all the colossally FAT Americans eating their mattress-sized steaks.  Actually it's not the steaks that make us fat.  It's the gallon-sized jugs of soda pop we guzzle . . French fries (chips, you call 'em) and 'snack foods': chips (crisps), snack cakes, candy bars, nachos, cheese out of a can . . basically if it comes wrapped in plastic or is made from plastic, we'll eat it.  And we are lazy as hell.  Walking is that thing we do when heading from our house to the attached garage where our car is, and that short distance from our car to the door of wherever we are going.  Then we get into a lift to take us to our desks where we are going to sit for the next 8 hours  . .and that's so tiring we have to eat a donut or 3 . . or perhaps a bagel smothered in cream cheese.  With coffee out of a mug as big as our head, of course.  Coffee . . the American drink ever since that little tea party in Boston Harbor in 1773 thrown by Mr. Sam Adams and his cronies.

 

I hope that I may go to Heaven without ever having tasted, ingested, smelled, or seen in the flesh, haggis, if it please God.  I do want to visit Scotland but I will try not to go out of my way to search for haggis.  Some kind of stew and innards cooked in a sheep's stomach, innit bruv?  Haggis rhymes with 'Gaggis!!!'  I do not eat mutton, or its infantile counterpart.  I say 'no' to baby animals in general.  No veal. 

 

On behalf of the United States, allow me to apologize (again) for the 'orrible, terrible attempt at Cockney by Mr. van Dyke in Mary Poppins.  Mr. van Dyke was hired by Walt Disney because he was a big star and Walt needed a box office name to counterbalance the unknown Julie Andrews for this expensive little project of his.  Dick had an appealing face and was a song-and-dance man who could do physical comedy.  Or, I *thought* that his dancing ability had been the selling point that clinched the part for him.  I found out that actually van Dyke had not danced professionally before this but he learned Bert's dance numbers like some kind of dance savant.  I've always thought he was handsome, and he had a playful energy that played well with Julie.  Could not do a Cockney accent to save his life, though.  Or, he could hit it *some* of the time . . just maybe not on consecutive words, always.

 

I will see you one Dick van Dyke, and raise you one Sir Sean Connery, attempting a 'Chicago Irish' beat cop in 'The Untouchables'.  The attempt was legendary . . it just wasn't *good*.  D'ya suppose we're even, boyo?  :)

 

Here's something for ya!

 

The English Language in 67 Accents--#9 is Lancashire.  How'd he do?

--------------------------------------------------

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=riwKuKSbFDs

 

The 'general American' #17 is sort of a Midwestern/California hybrid.  He could get by.  His 'redneck' is very good and probably his favorite.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On behalf of the United States, allow me to apologize (again) for the 'orrible, terrible attempt at Cockney by Mr. van Dyke in Mary Poppins.  Mr. van Dyke was hired by Walt Disney because he was a big star and Walt needed a box office name to counterbalance the unknown Julie Andrews for this expensive little project of his.  Dick had an appealing face and was a song-and-dance man who could do physical comedy.  Or, I *thought* that his dancing ability had been the selling point that clinched the part for him.  I found out that actually van Dyke had not danced professionally before this but he learned Bert's dance numbers like some kind of dance savant.  I've always thought he was handsome, and he had a playful energy that played well with Julie.  Could not do a Cockney accent to save his life, though.  Or, he could hit it *some* of the time . . just maybe not on consecutive words, always.

 

That accent didn't bother me at the time, and I must admit still didn't the last time I saw the movie -- for all I know, it's an authentic chimney-sweep accent!  As I've said before, I think the average American can recognize about five British accents: Cockney, "Posh" alias "English Butler," Liverpool alias "Beatles accent," Irish (meaning the "faith and begorra" version -- I had no idea Andrew Scott was Irish till I read it), and Scottish.  Even so, I suspect that's well ahead of the average Brit's recognition of American accents.  Heck, I have trouble recognizing some American accents.

 

As for when he learned to dance (as an entertainer), he did a fair amount in the Dick Van Dyke Show, which debuted in 1961 -- but then it ran till '66, and Poppins was filmed about halfway through that time span.  It'd be interesting to check which seasons of his show featured the dance numbers.

 

And before I forget, I just discovered that there's a Mary Poppins sequel in the works for next year, and the only returning actor is -- Dick Van Dyke!  He's not playing Bert, though, so you can relax.  I think he's playing the son of the elderly banker that he played last time.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello Carol and Hikari,

 

The guy in the link was good. There are so many accents in such a small place as the Uk (vastly more in The States of course) that we can usually only generalise as to ‘area.’ Examples are Newcastle and Sunderland up in the North East Of England. I can hear someone speak and immediately say ‘north east,’ but I can’t really distinguish between Newcastle and Sunderland. But there is a definate difference. I come from an area known as The Black Country and most people from other areas of the UK confuse the accent with a Birmingham one. To my ears it’s not close but to someone from other parts it’s similar. For both of you, a Birmingham accent is Ozzy Osbourne. The Black Country is more the comedian Lenny Henry (if you’ve heard of him?) Touché with the Sean Connery accent by the way Hikari but I’ll add one to the mix. It’s Robert Duvall (fine actor) as Watson in The Seven Percent Solution. It’s not that it’s a poor accent it’s just that it’s famous for being exaggeratedly ‘posh.’ Apparently he modelled it on the Conductor Sir Adrian Bolt but I’ve heard Bolt speak and even he’s not that posh! You are absolutely right Carol about those of us from the UK and American accents. If I heard your voice, Hikari’s and Arcadia’s I wouldn’t be able to identify who was who. Unless there’s someone very famous from Indiana (apart from yourself of course

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You are absolutely right Carol about those of us from the UK and American accents. If I heard your voice, Hikari’s and Arcadia’s I wouldn’t be able to identify who was who. Unless there’s someone very famous from Indiana (apart from yourself of course

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

  • Who's Online   0 Members, 1 Anonymous, 25 Guests (See full list)

    There are no registered users currently online

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of UseWe have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.Privacy PolicyGuidelines.