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4 hours ago, Arcadia said:

I thought the French Connection was Vernet the artist? As well as a popular movie.

:axe:

Well, yes.  In "The Greek Interpreter," Holmes says " my grandmother ... was the sister of Vernet, the French artist."

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Just now, Carol the Dabbler said:

:axe:

Well, yes.  In "The Greek Interpreter," Holmes says " my grandmother ... was the sister of Vernet, the French artist."

Thanks for the reference. I just couldn't remember the exact one. Still, his grandmother was French, that could make Dupin a cousin or such.

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I must say, this whole thing has been interesting to think about, the possible connections between the detectives. There's also a story about a young man, can't remember his name, but he is the son of Sherlock Holmes, can't remember the wife, but I do know that later in life the boy would be referred to as Nero Wolfe. Honestly, with some of these things, we could possibly make an entire detective family tree.

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Hello Sarios,

it has been suggested in Holmes lore that the detective Nero Wolfe was the offspring of Sherlock Holmes and Irene Adler. In fact I’ve only recently read a pastiche by David Marcum which also introduces this idea (it also gives Holmes a family connection to the detective Solar Pons.) Doyle definitely admired the work of Poe and Poe was, more than anyone else, an influence on Doyle to create his own detective. Doyle freely admitted though that Holmes’ methods of observation and deduction were mainly based on his old Edinburgh tutor Dr. Joseph Bell.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joseph_Bell

I can’t recommend the series Murder Rooms The Dark Beginnings Of Sherlock Holmes enough by the way.

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4 hours ago, Sheerluck said:

Thanks for the reference. I just couldn't remember the exact one. Still, his grandmother was French, that could make Dupin a cousin or such.

Also, when Watson’s wife died he sold his practice and moved back to Baker Street. The doctor that bought it was called Verner (Holmes had put up the money for a relative.)

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48 minutes ago, HerlockSholmes said:

Also, when Watson’s wife died he sold his practice and moved back to Baker Street. The doctor that bought it was called Verner (Holmes had put up the money for a relative.)

There's always some scrounger/bounder in every family. And if you don't know who it is in your family you should probably look in the mirror. ;)

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Oh, I know of thieves, half of my family is thick with them. But I will look into the book series you suggest Herlock. Herlock, that is a reference to Arsene Lupin correct? Something about Doyle getting upset that the author of that book used Sherlock without permission?

Correction, I have found out that it is not a book series, my mistake.

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The actor that plays Bell, Ian Richardson, also made a very good Holmes in two movies👍

Solar Pons came about by a young man asking Doyle if he intended to write more Holmes stories in 1928. When Doyle said no he asked if he could write some. Doyle politely said no so the young man created Solar Pons. Brilliant stories by the way.

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I will check out the Solar Pons stuff. Never heard of him, but this could be interesting. On that side note, I am thinking about writing my own detective, setting it around the 1840's with Dupin and Sherlock being my main inspirations for this one.

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That will be interesting Sarios. Here’s a bit of Pons info from a real expert.

http://17stepprogram.blogspot.co.uk/2017/09/solar-pons-sherlock-holmes-of-praed.html#comment-form

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9 hours ago, HerlockSholmes said:

That will be interesting Sarios. Here’s a bit of Pons info from a real expert.

http://17stepprogram.blogspot.co.uk/2017/09/solar-pons-sherlock-holmes-of-praed.html#comment-form

An interesting quote from that:

I'm convinced that some of the Basil Rathbone Sherlock Holmes films that are absolutely set in World War II are actually Pons adventures, with his name changed to Holmes to avoid confusion....

 
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We tend to forget that Mofftiss weren’t the first to take Holmes out of the Victorian era. David Marcum’s suggestion is an interesting one.

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Well, here we are in a new season . . happy Midsummer's Day, everyone. 

I have another Other Detective to add to our little collective.

May I introduce everyone to Dr. Lucien Blake, star detective of The Doctor Blake Mysteries (ITV-Australia).  He says G'day.

Craig McLachlan portrays Dr. Blake, a WWII veteran and former POW survivor who was captured by the Japanese during the fall of Singapore in 1942 and held prisoner in a camp for 3 years.  His French mother died under mysterious circumstances when he was 12 and shortly thereafter, Lucien's father, Thomas Blake, M.D., shipped his only child off to boarding school.  University followed, then medical school, enlistment in the Army, and marriage to a beautiful Chinese woman with whom he had a daughter.  Both disappeared in the chaos following the Japanese invasion of Singapore, where the family was living, and Lucien has never stopped believing that they are still alive, and looking for them through a Chinese private detective.

1959, Ballarat, Australia:  The prodigal son has finally returned to his hometown, to take over his late father's general medical practice.  He also succeeds Dr. Blake, Sr. as the town's official police surgeon . .which means that aside from providing medical attention to members of the force, he functions as the chief coroner, certifying deaths in the district and doing autopsies when required.  There are a lot of strange deaths on Dr. Blake's patch, and he is not content to merely dissect and file reports, because he has the soul of a detective.   So he is always infiltrating crime scenes, filching official records and lifting crucial evidence from crime scenes & being a general pain in the arse to his police supervisor, Chief Superintendent Matthew Lawson (Joel Tobeck).  Lawson routinely has to chew him out and remind him of his official boundaries, but Lawson is more bark than bite.  The two are former classmates and childhood friends, so Blake's maverick ways mostly get a benign eye from his police 'boss'.

Lucien (which means 'Light-Bringer', quite apt)  drives his father's ancient but lovingly maintained Standard automobile (circa 1937 model) and lives in his father's house, where he has also inherited his father's housekeeper/receptionist, the briskly-efficient Mrs. Jean Beasley (Nadine Gardner) a prim, sharp-tongued yet comely woman of the doctor's own age.  Jean is a war widow with two grown sons.  Also sharing the household is Ballarat district nurse, Mattie O'Brien, a regular boarder.  Mrs. Beasley's nephew, Detective Constable Danny Parks (Rick Donald) drops by for home-cooked meals.  Having young people in the house helps lift Dr. Blake out of his tendency to melancholy spirits, but he suffers from insomnia and has a significant attachment to his whisky bottle.  Despite his sorrows, and being told daily by various people in town how he is failing to live up to the glorified standard set by his late father, Blake finds his juices really get flowing by a call to a grisly murder scene.  I call him a cross between Inspector Morse & Quincy, M.E. with a Down Under flair.

Series star Craig McLachlan is best known in his native country as a vapid soap opera beefcake (Neighbours) and for originating the role of flamboyant transvestite Dr. Frank N. Furter of Rocky Horror Picture Show fame on stage in Australia.  With this reputation one can understand producers' initial hesitation to give him a reading for Dr. Blake.  He was considered both too lightweight, and too youthful-looking (though Craig is actually spot-on as to the Doctor's age--he just looks much younger than he is.)  But he walked into the audition in character as we see him onscreen and blew everyone away.  Blake is a bravura act of transformation not to be missed.

Dr. Blake exhibits many Sherlockian traits, combined with the medical acumen of a Dr. Watson.  He's aces at reading the forensic clues left behind at crime scenes.  He excels at lab work.  He's got a signature hat and coat that he always wears.  He is always impeccably dressed.  He takes refuge in a chemical substance to distract his restless mind.  Eats very little, sleeps less.  Has a loyal 'Lestrade' who relies on him absolutely.  His refusal to play along with societal conventions at times aggravates more conventional people.  He is essentially a loner; his intellect and life experiences have left him set apart from 'normal' people's more placid existences.  The address of his house/surgery in Ballarat is, get this: 7 Mycroft Avenue.  I don't know if such a street exists in the real Ballarat (the show is shot on location) or if it is a nod to Sherlock Holmes by the series creators.

With a nod to Inspector Morse for the loneliness, the alcohol dependency, the inductive leaps of logic and the signature automobile.  He has a more puckish sense of humor than Morse, though.  More Sherlocky, or maybe it's Jack Klugman as Quincy I am thinking of.

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Anyone heard about Jerome Caminada?

Is he the closest real life Sherlock Holmes? I have been fascinated reading about him here and there, and want to acquire Twenty Five Years of Detective Life book but still trying to find good deal.

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On 7/20/2018 at 10:27 AM, Van Buren Supernova said:

Anyone heard about Jerome Caminada?

Is he the closest real life Sherlock Holmes? I have been fascinated reading about him here and there, and want to acquire Twenty Five Years of Detective Life book but still trying to find good deal.

Hi VBS,

Im only around a year late in spotting this post🙂

I have this book on Caminada which is very good.

http://www.123pricecheck.com/Product-266239/1781592691-The+Real+Sherlock+Holmes+The+Hidden+Story+of+Jerom.html

and here’s a couple of cheap copies of the one you mentioned.

http://www.123pricecheck.com/Product-266239/1151260932-Twenty+Five+Years+of+Detective+Life.html

volume 2 going cheap too

http://www.123pricecheck.com/Product-266239/1151260932-Twenty+Five+Years+of+Detective+Life.html

The only problem is that they’re not a set. Different publishers or publishing runs.

Youve probably already got these by now. Hope it helps anyway. 123pricecheck is a useful site.👍

 

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I'd never heard of 123pricecheck before; it does indeed look like a useful site, especially for folks in the UK.  Bearing in mind that A} they apparently compare prices only from UK companies, and B} they don't take foreign shipping charges into account (to say nothing of the fact that some vendors won't ship to foreign countries), with the result that C} there may be cheaper deals from non-UK vendors, and D} local vendors are more likely to offer free shipping -- well, even bearing all that in mind, they look like a good resource.

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2 hours ago, Carol the Dabbler said:

I'd never heard of 123pricecheck before; it does indeed look like a useful site, especially for folks in the UK.  Bearing in mind that A} they apparently compare prices only from UK companies, and B} they don't take foreign shipping charges into account (to say nothing of the fact that some vendors won't ship to foreign countries), with the result that C} there may be cheaper deals from non-UK vendors, and D} local vendors are more likely to offer free shipping -- well, even bearing all that in mind, they look like a good resource.

To be honest Carol I’d never looked into the details. Not much use over there then.

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I wouldn't say that, Herlock.  Alex and I sometimes find we can get a better deal by ordering from the UK, and in fact there are times when something is only available from the UK.  At times like those (and British books are likely to fall into that category), it'd be helpful to know who's got the best deal over there.

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Thanks for the suggestions Herlock and Carol. Haven't got the chance to look into it but I will eventually.

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On 3/26/2019 at 12:06 AM, Carol the Dabbler said:

I wouldn't say that, Herlock.  Alex and I sometimes find we can get a better deal by ordering from the UK, and in fact there are times when something is only available from the UK.  At times like those (and British books are likely to fall into that category), it'd be helpful to know who's got the best deal over there.

The good thing is that they price different versions/publications of the same book. A week or so ago I was looking for one and there were prices ranging from £25-£40 which was more than I was willing to pay. I eventually found one for £11.

Ebay annoys me sometimes when I see something I want and it’s from another country (sometimes The States) and the book is £4 but the postage is £30! It’s all about having the patience to shop around and the restraint not to just pay because you really want something. The latter is my weakness☹️

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This is probably really off the wall, but my (2nd) favourite fictional detective is at the complete opposite end of the spectrum from Sherlock Holmes (aside from the drug use that is), and it's DS Bruce Robertson of the Lothian and Borders Constabulary (as was) a creation of Irvine Welch in the novel 'Filth'. It's an unpleasant read, as it takes the reader into the dark blue world of a seriously deranged and degenerate rogue detective who can't get any lower. He's not even a likable character: apart from the nasty stuff that is articulated, there are hints of all sorts of really taboo horrendous crimes that he has likely committed and buried in his head. But it's just so readable, once you get past the tongue in which it's written. Hound of the Baskervilles aside, it's the only novel that I've read over and over again. 

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I don’t know if anyone has heard of John Dickson Carr? He was an American writer who wrote a biography of Doyle. He was also a writer of classic era crime fiction specialising I guess in the classic locked room-type mysteries. In fact his story The Hollow Man was voted the best locked room mystery ever. He wrote 22 stories using his hero Sir Henry Merrivale (under the pen name Carter Dickson) and 23 stories starring his most famous creation Dr Gideon Fell. These were written between 1933 and 1967. Carr died in 1977.

Id always meant to check out Carr’s stories (having only read his biography of Doyle and his famous collection of Holmes pastiches called The Exploits Of Sherlock Holmes, written with Adrian Conan Doyle) Last week I bought Carr’s first Gideon Fell book Hag’s Nook. Let’s just say that I’ll be looking for more. This isn’t a long book 150+ pages but the plot is great, it’s well written Imo, it’s certainly atmospheric and Fell is a great character. He’s a large chap that wears a cape, walks on two sticks and is writing his magnum opus about the history of English drinking habits. Like Nero Wolfe and Morse, Fell likes his beer. 

Ive also just listened to two Gideon Fell radio plays on YouTube starring English actor Donald Sinden as Fell.

Definitely worth checking out. Definitely the kind of book for a wintry night and a glass of something medicinal.👍

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Wasn't "The Hollow Man" one of the cases mentioned in a Holmes story? I forget which one. It was alluded to during the wedding speech in "Sherlock."

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I don't offhand recall that being one of Holmes's untold cases (not that I'm any expert), nor does Google turn up much except references to Carr's book -- which was published in 1935, so it's apparently a classic in itself; therefore I'd hazard a guess that the Moftisses were alluding to it, just as they've often done to The Private Life of SH.

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On 6/5/2019 at 3:02 PM, Arcadia said:

Wasn't "The Hollow Man" one of the cases mentioned in a Holmes story? I forget which one. It was alluded to during the wedding speech in "Sherlock."

I can’t recall it Arcadia but you could be right. I’ll have to watch the wedding speech again.

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