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HerlockSholmes

Female Sherlock!

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tw3jHjEgPFU

 

 

I don't know what to think of this. The Japanese mystery series that I've seen have been a mixed bag. Some have been good. Others not so much.

 

I hope this series is good though. I need a good mystery series to watch because nobody knows how long it will take for another Sherlock season to premiere.

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Anybody have any idea how to see it in this country? I assume it will involve some sort of pay service.... :(

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Thanks Fantasy! Interesting! Any more of them?

Never mind. All I had to do was scroll down.... :rolleyes: 

 

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On ‎6‎/‎14‎/‎2018 at 2:18 PM, Fantasy Lover said:

You can see it here with subtitles.

https://m.ok.ru/video/753990961898

I had to go to another link since this one wouldn't open for me, but based on the first 15 minutes, here's what I know so far:

Wato-san is a surgeon freshly returned from a posting in Syria (maybe with Doctors Without Borders?) whose mentor comes to meet her at the airport.  Within minutes he is felled by a mysterious attack.  Miss Sherlock discovers the cause:  a Devils' foot bomb planted in his stomach.

The Japanese language is structured so that it is very difficult for an educated woman to sound anything other than polite while using the standard form.  So far as I can tell, Miss Sherlock is not using any rude or lower-class words but she does have the Sherlock-like habit of asking extremely blunt and personal questions coupled with inappropriate smiling.

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***Finished Ep. 1.  Wato and Sherlock will be living together now, prompted by the urging of Mycroft.  The Japanese Mycroft is impeccably dressed and also, thin.  The Japanese Mrs. Hudson is a very elegant lady.

My initial impression is that this is more of a Japanese nod to Elementary than it is to BBC Sherlock.  Wato-san here is also a doctor who has lost confidence in her abilities or her direction in life.  Like the Canon Dr. Watson, though, she has returned to her native city after an extended period abroad, and having displeased her parents, in the far north of Sapporo, does not feel she can return to them.  So when she meets 'Sherlock', she is both jobless and homeless.  Her dress sense is a bit collegiate/frumpy but she is not the timid mouse that the promos for this series led one to expect. 

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I have the first season on VUDU ( 8 episodes), and have watched them all. I have very little to complain about so far. In point of fact, so far the only thing i have an issue with is the timidness of the Wato-San character. However, this may be a combination of the PTSD she is struggling with, and Japanese culture in general (though i am not particularly knowledgeable of the culture/norms in japan, and so may be wrong on that count). At any rate, I very much enjoyed the first season, and found it interesting that to begin with, they had a lot of friction between Sherlock and Wato-San (far more than in the original canon). I also like that they focused on some of the lesser adapted canon stories.  I am eager to see what season 2 brings.

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8 hours ago, GodNort1985 said:

... so far the only thing i have an issue with is the timidness of the Wato-San character. However, this may be a combination of the PTSD she is struggling with, and Japanese culture in general (though i am not particularly knowledgeable of the culture/norms in japan, and so may be wrong on that count).

I've seen only a few clips of the show, and I'm certainly no expert on Japanese culture either, but I have read a certain amount about Japan, plus a friend of mine now lives there.  As I understand it, Japanese people in general (and women in particular) appear extremely non-assertive to Westerners, because they do not state things forcefully, they sort of (by our standards) beat around the bush.  Another Japanese person will understand what they're getting at, because they were raised the same way, but if there's a Westerner is at the other end of the conversation, they may be totally frustrated, like "Why can't I get a straight answer from this guy?"  It's kind of like the difference between men and women in Western culture, where a woman is embarrassing herself by (she thinks) throwing herself at a man that she's attracted to, and meanwhile he doesn't even notice, even if he's also attracted to her.

So it may actually be the Sherlock character who's unusual, by being more forceful than the Japanese norm, while Wato-san is more of a normal Japanese woman -- kind of like the contrast between the traditional Holmes and Watson, really.

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15 hours ago, Carol the Dabbler said:

I've seen only a few clips of the show, and I'm certainly no expert on Japanese culture either, but I have read a certain amount about Japan, plus a friend of mine now lives there.  As I understand it, Japanese people in general (and women in particular) appear extremely non-assertive to Westerners, because they do not state things forcefully, they sort of (by our standards) beat around the bush.  Another Japanese person will understand what they're getting at, because they were raised the same way, but if there's a Westerner is at the other end of the conversation, they may be totally frustrated, like "Why can't I get a straight answer from this guy?"  It's kind of like the difference between men and women in Western culture, where a woman is embarrassing herself by (she thinks) throwing herself at a man that she's attracted to, and meanwhile he doesn't even notice, even if he's also attracted to her.

So it may actually be the Sherlock character who's unusual, by being more forceful than the Japanese norm, while Wato-san is more of a normal Japanese woman -- kind of like the contrast between the traditional Holmes and Watson, really.

No may about it, Miss Sherlock is very unusual according to her cultural standards.  Japanese society is a good 50 years behind the United States in terms of social equality.  2019 still feels a lot like 1969 over there, with better technology.

Men hold all the power positions in society, and a woman is supposed to ideally look cute, be impeccably dressed and devote all her energies to keeping the home and raising children.  It's very rare, nearly non-existent, to find women in positions of authority in male-dominated industries . .which is pretty much all of them . .medicine, politics, law enforcement, business . . The greatest equality I found there was in education, and it was one of the few careers that allowed married women with children to continue along the same career trajectory as their male colleagues.  For the most part, women are actively encouraged to resign their jobs after becoming pregnant.  It's a very chauvinist culture.  But within the home, the mother reigns supreme.  Miss Sherlock has no husband or children and conducts herself very much like a man would.  Actually even more pushy than a normal young Japanese man in terms of being aggressive and in-your-face and in her personal directness.  Japanese culture and language is all about indirectness.  That comes from hundreds of years of living under a martial system where your overlords could cut your head off on a whim, or if you looked at them sideways.   The true art lies in getting people to do what you want them to do without 'demanding' it, and in getting out of things you do not wish to do without ever resorting to overt 'No' and/or being labeled 'difficult'.  To the Japanese way of doing things, Western bluntness and open displays of emotion, be it happy, sad or angry can be construed as rudeness or immaturity. . . .or at the most extreme . .mental illness.  Miss Sherlock defies a number of her own cultural standards and is much more 'American' in her approach.  Like BC's Sherlock, she also favors what is deemed socially inappropriate smiling & remarks.  She is very unladylike  by Japanese standards, but she looks great at all times any way.

Wato-san fulfills the primary Watsonian function of providing contrast to her flatmate/friend  by embodying the 'conventional' standards of her society.  Though as a surgeon who has spent significant time abroad by herself while being unmarried and childless, she's sort of a 'hanbun'--half and half traditional young Japanese woman with a few 'Sherlocky' characteristics.  Japanese women are highly educated--more women achieve university degrees in Japan than the men do, even--but they are sorely underrepresented in the higher professions due to the prevailing cultural belief that the most important contribution a woman can make, and the one a 'real' woman is happy to aspire to is making babies for Japan, Inc.  

By that standard, both Miss Sherlock & Wato-san are out of the mainstream, but Miss S. is just flat-out 'weird'.  But that's what off-kilter geniuses **do**.  :)

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3 hours ago, Hikari said:

No may about it, Miss Sherlock is very unusual according to her cultural standards.  [....]

... the most important contribution a woman can make, and the one a 'real' woman is happy to aspire to is making babies for Japan, Inc.

And I suspect that attitude is unlikely to change any time soon, due to the current (last I heard) low birth rate.  Over here, we keep building more schools, while over there, schools are being closed for lack of young people.

Thanks for your detailed confirmation of my impression.

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On 2/8/2019 at 2:46 PM, Carol the Dabbler said:

And I suspect that attitude is unlikely to change any time soon, due to the current (last I heard) low birth rate.  Over here, we keep building more schools, while over there, schools are being closed for lack of young people.

Thanks for your detailed confirmation of my impression.

Fewer and fewer educated Japanese women are opting to pursue the traditional Japanese feminine track of marriage well before 30 and the replacement quota of 2 children.  These educated women are opting instead to continue working or pursue graduate degrees and spend their disposable income and vacations enjoying foreign or domestic travel.  They are getting their consciousness raised in the way their American sisters did in the 1970s, and the fossilized patriarchal Japanese system is getting a shake-up.  In 2018, along comes 'Miss Sherlock', and she and Wato are perhaps a reflection of their changing society--two highly-educated and accomplished women who are making their own career paths completely free of dependency on a male figure, be it husband or father.  Even 5 years ago, a show like Miss Sherlock probably wouldn't have gotten an airing in its home country because it would have been deemed too progressive . . there is even a whiff of homoerotic tension between them.  A 'Sherlock' is always going to be out of the mainstream of his or her society, being that much more brilliant than an average person . .but Miss Sherlock and Wato aren't as off-kilter as they would have been not all that long ago.

'The hand that rocks the cradle rules the world', as the saying goes . . Japanese women are going to be asserting their power by the opposite, I think--by choosing not to reproduce and perpetuate an archaic system where old men make all the decisions for them while they stay at home in the kitchen.  As the current regime of elderly politicians and captains of industry die off, Japan will be forced to promote promising women to positions of authority and make more meaningful work opportunities available to their highly educated female workforce.  They are sweating over who is going to take care of a rapidly aging population, with so few children relative to the senior population.  There are going to be growing pains, but I think it will ultimately be for the good.  I lived there from 1990 - 96 and I met many wonderful, smart women during my time there.  But I felt at times like I was trapped in an Asian version of Pleasantville . . the calendar said it was the 1990s, but based on the roles for women, I could have just as easily been in 1972 or 1952 . . with better transportation and fewer kimonos.   The professional women I knew tended to be unmarried, because that seemed to be the only way for a female to retain an identity of her own.

Felt a bit Kafkaesque, to be honest.  In my opinion, Japanese women are smarter than the men are but they are just starting to have a voice in their own society.  

Apart from any social commentary which may or may not have been intended by its creators, Miss Sherlock looks like it's fun.

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