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Libraries are closed.

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9 minutes ago, Arcadia said:

Well, that does sound like a good price. I'm not paying for anything at the moment, tho ... I'm out of work indefinitely, the tax refund has already been spent, and who knows whether this "stimulus check" will actually arrive. (Seems to me people with low income always get left out of such things.) My savings account is already depleted due to a major car repair, so...... scary times ahead. I may have to stop paying for my internet connection if this goes on for very long. Thank goodness warmer weather is coming, or I'd have trouble paying the heating bill. All of this just as my checking account was beginning to look healthy for the first time in months.

So, yeah, because of the cost. :smile: 

Oh, I certainly wasn't suggesting it right now.  The series' won't even be finished until the end of 2021, or later now with the production stall.

But anyway, I feel you.  :(  I'm in exactly the same situation, down to the major car repair.  Even if a stimulus check does eventually arrive, the amount they're talking about won't go all that far.  Scary times indeed.

I wish I had some words of encouragement for you that wouldn't sound trite... but I really don't know what to do.  Just trying to take it day by day.
 

giphy.gif

 

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1 minute ago, Arcadia said:

Libraries are closed.

Oh.  Duh.  :blush:

Next you're gonna tell me that all the internet cafes are closed too!

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4 minutes ago, Artemis said:

Oh, I certainly wasn't suggesting it right now.  The series' won't even be finished until the end of 2021, or later now with the production stall.

But anyway, I feel you.  :(  I'm in exactly the same situation, down to the major car repair.  Even if a stimulus check does eventually arrive, the amount they're talking about won't go all that far.  Scary times indeed.

I wish I had some words of encouragement for you that wouldn't sound trite... but I really don't know what to do.  Just trying to take it day by day.
 

giphy.gif

 

Thanks, you too. That's all that can be done right now anyway. I'll get through it somehow.

1 minute ago, Carol the Dabbler said:

Oh.  Duh.  :blush:

Next you're gonna tell me that all the internet cafes are closed too!

You know, we don't have those around here. Never did have many, and they only lasted a couple of years. We simply don't need them; almost everyone has a smart phone, and almost every restaurant and coffee shop have wifi. But they're all closed too. Well, you can get take out, but you can't go in and sit.

Anyway, I'm on the internet at all different weird hours (like 11 p.m. :smile: ) and wouldn't be heading out at those times anyway. May have to make some major life-style changes. Hope not.

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2 minutes ago, Arcadia said:

You know, we don't have those around here. Never did have many, and they only lasted a couple of years. We simply don't need them; almost everyone has a smart phone, and almost every restaurant and coffee shop have wifi. But they're all closed too. Well, you can get take out, but you can't go in and sit.

Anyway, I'm on the internet at all different weird hours (like 11 p.m. :smile: ) and wouldn't be heading out at those times anyway. May have to make some major life-style changes. Hope not.

^ Same, none of those here either.

 

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Our library has told people they can still access their internet from the parking lot. Limited to closest row to the building but I have seen a few people parked there. 

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Yeah, if worse comes to worse I can sit in my car outside Panera's. Which is about a 15 minute drive. I love living in the "country", but it does have its disadvantages.

Actually, if I have to drop my home wifi, my next best bet might be a cheapie smart phone plan. Still a lot of money at this moment, but also a lot less than internet. I imagine the minutes are pretty limited tho. Then of course you have to buy the phone too .... okay, maybe not such a good bet after all. :rolleyes: 

I've applied for unemployment compensation, let's see if that helps. Have a feeling I may not be eligible, due to the intermittent nature of my job. Then again, since the Dems took over the Virginia legislature, things have been a lot easier for the "underemployed" than they used to be. We'll see.

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35 minutes ago, Arcadia said:

I've applied for unemployment compensation, let's see if that helps.


With any luck, by the time that gets approved (or not) you'll be working again.  But yeah, the check would recharge your poor ol' bank account.

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I hope so. But it's an educational institution; they tend to follow what the public schools do, and those have already been closed for the rest of the year in this state. (Apparently people are going nuts trying to homeschool! :D ) 

I just (re)discovered I have tons of "reward points" on my Microsoft account, which can be redeemed to buy stuff ... like groceries! Yay!!!!!  First time something like that has ever been useful, go Microsoft!

 

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3 hours ago, Arcadia said:

... it's an educational institution; they tend to follow what the public schools do, and those have already been closed for the rest of the year in this state.

 

So you're thinking art classes will most likely resume sometime in August?

 

.

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No idea. A couple of hours ago I just learned that the governor ordered everyone to stay home to the end of June. So I assume that will apply to the arts center as well. Yeowtch.

The school year ends in June, so that's what I was thinking. So at least I'm not surprised.

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12 minutes ago, Arcadia said:

... the governor ordered everyone to stay home to the end of June. So I assume that will apply to the arts center as well.

Absolutely no offense intended, but yes, I assume art classes would be considered "non-essential" under the current circumstances.

Here in Indiana, the ban on non-essential activities currently runs through April 6 -- but it was originally through March 31, so I kinda expect the end date to be extended several more times while they monitor the situation.  I'd be surprised if we're once more free to move about the state till at least late May.

 

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13 hours ago, Carol the Dabbler said:

Absolutely no offense intended, but yes, I assume art classes would be considered "non-essential" under the current circumstances.

ZkAp8AF.jpg?1  Whhaaaat?!????!!?!!

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On 3/29/2020 at 5:36 PM, Arcadia said:

I've applied for unemployment compensation....

 

What about food stamps?

 

.

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7 minutes ago, Carol the Dabbler said:

 

What about food stamps?

I have no idea! Didn't even think of it. I've been poor but self-sufficient all my life, this requires a new way of thinking. Ugh.

Right now I've got enough of those reward points I mentioned to last me quite awhile, but I guess I'd better look into food stamps too.  Thanks for the idea. Now to convince the internet company to give me a lower rate....

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1 hour ago, Arcadia said:

I've got enough of those reward points I mentioned to last me quite awhile, but I guess I'd better look into food stamps too.

Right, 'cause food stamps cover only certain things.  I doubt they can be used for cat food, for one thing, so you may want to save your points for things like that.

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8 hours ago, Arcadia said:

Now to convince the internet company to give me a lower rate....

Well, that was the waste of an hour.....

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On 3/30/2020 at 6:41 PM, Arcadia said:

(Apparently people are going nuts trying to homeschool! :D ) 

Sorry if I offend anyone in advance or being ignorant (now I'm clear to say everything offensive right?):D 

I don't really get homeschool, I don't have it in places that I have stayed. Is there a way to ensure that parents in question are eligible to educate the children, and how to be sure? I mean, there are a lot of subjects, does it mean that the parents have to excel (at least knowledgeable) in those subjects. Unless they are really good, or are in teaching profession, I can't imagine that being very possible, especially because the system and education content changes constantly.

Second, would the children be deprived from social interactions with kids at their own age, the experience of being in school, interaction with teachers, simulations etc. (On very dark side I actually watched quite a lot of domestic abuse cases being undetected because children are not required to attend school --> home school base) I think it's a very important part of our growing up phase, as much as I hate kids even when I'm a kid, I had good time in school and uni, I love it, learning, being exposed with variety of knowledge, solidarity, or the cheese and mushy and crap and all, it lumps into good memory and shape me the way I am today.

Not long ago, my cousin's wife, contacted me through phone. First of all, I had only met her once, donkey years ago, and haven't spoken to my cousin in more that two decades, we were not very close as well, as there was a big age gap, but he was partially brought up by my parents, and perhaps the only one that turns out to be good and grateful. He is my very very distant big brother, I believe he would not hesitant to beat people up for me, but again, we never get in touch since I never attend any family function and stay abroad. So it was a surprise that she called me. Both my cousin and her are lowly educated, but my cousin managed to get a good life by working hard, and now they were asking for advice for their daughter. They are torn in either sending her to uni, or let her start her own business with the college fund. Their consideration is, this significant amount of money can propel her into the possible future instead of wasting it on college that would pay pitiful wage after you graduate and there is no guarantee for decent job.

I'm very proud of my cousin, who manages to set aside this very significant fund for his daughter without him having proper education himself, and for them to actually want to ask around instead of swearing off education (since they have proven they could do without). Education is so expensive but I see many in my family try to prevent their kids from getting into student debt like my actual big brother too, who is now in headache. We were all lucky that we had some kind of scholarship and didn't need student loan as struggling as adult without that is already a big burden.

Anyway, they asked for my advice, since I'm majoring in something related to what they think their daughter is into (the mother who spoke to me say they are all confused about what they want now). Well, at the time she called me, I have just resigned from my job, sick with everything and want to try to be self-employed in something I'm passionate about but I'd be poor. I want to be my own boss, and it's basically the dream of almost everyone who are working with someone else. So this daughter could have a shortcut, it would be a very decent money for her to start something and skip wasting years and years for uni. How lucky!

But then again, I was thinking about what she would miss, the life and social experience, the maturity and exposure, the widened horizon (not to stereotype much, but we all came from small town and I had seen too many cases of the close-mindedness of less educated people and it scares me, there are reason why I think only this cousin from my father side turns out to be a great person) and so, as usual, when being asked for advice, I'd be useless. I almost never provide an answer they are hoping for, or even giving them the hint of which side I'm leaning, because I think in this case, they have to make their own decision. (As a sucker as I am now, if they put a gun in my head, I'd still ask them to go with education). So I laid out the pros and cons of both side, including yes, the hardship of going through the uni way, that could open multiple doors but blbalabla, at the end, I did advice her to go with the one the daughter is passionate about, because without it, everything means nothing. Some people hate studying and some can't imagine living without it.

What do you guy think?

Actually, what was I at again??? Why am I rambling so far? Good God, this is not even a proper thread for rambling!

On 3/31/2020 at 10:54 AM, Arcadia said:

No idea. A couple of hours ago I just learned that the governor ordered everyone to stay home to the end of June.

End of June????? 

I can't imagine, I hope it doesn't come to that far. Stay at home, I like it. But voluntarily, the world can't afford that. It will be scary, the impact.

37 minutes ago, Arcadia said:

Well, that was the waste of an hour.....

If anything, they are the business that is booming now and the one with fat pocket in all this crisis, they wouldn't see the reason why they would help out..

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47 minutes ago, Van Buren Supernova said:

don't really get homeschool, I don't have it in places that I have stayed. Is there a way to ensure that parents in question are eligible to educate the children, and how to be sure?

Here in Indiana (and I assume in other states as well), the kids have to follow pretty much the same curriculum as the public schools, using approved text books, and they have to pass tests at the end of the year.  Some parents are obviously more knowledgeable than others, but the same was true of my teachers and I managed to learn anyhow by reading the textbooks.  Basically, if kids are motivated, they'll learn, and if they're not, they won't.

51 minutes ago, Van Buren Supernova said:

Second, would the children be deprived from social interactions with kids at their own age,

The home-schoolers that I know belong to home-school organizations that provide group experiences -- not as often as regular schools, obviously, but on a regular basis.  And the kids seem well adjusted, as well as more knowledgeable than a lot of public-school grads.

56 minutes ago, Van Buren Supernova said:

at the end, I did advice her to go with the one the daughter is passionate about, because without it, everything means nothing. Some people hate studying and some can't imagine living without it.

What do you guy think?

I think you gave good advice.

 

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5 hours ago, Carol the Dabbler said:
6 hours ago, Van Buren Supernova said:

don't really get homeschool, I don't have it in places that I have stayed. Is there a way to ensure that parents in question are eligible to educate the children, and how to be sure?

Here in Indiana (and I assume in other states as well), the kids have to follow pretty much the same curriculum as the public schools, using approved text books, and they have to pass tests at the end of the year.  Some parents are obviously more knowledgeable than others, but the same was true of my teachers and I managed to learn anyhow by reading the textbooks.  Basically, if kids are motivated, they'll learn, and if they're not, they won't.

Same here in Virginia. My nephew's wife home-schooled their kids, the requirements were pretty strict. And most of the home-schooled kids I've met struck me as pretty well-educated. I get a few of them in my art classes (because that's something their moms can't teach). They're fine.

 

5 hours ago, Carol the Dabbler said:
6 hours ago, Van Buren Supernova said:

Second, would the children be deprived from social interactions with kids at their own age,

The home-schoolers that I know belong to home-school organizations that provide group experiences -- not as often as regular schools, obviously, but on a regular basis.  And the kids seem well adjusted, as well as more knowledgeable than a lot of public-school grads.

Again, same here. Still ... I worry that they are not being exposed to a broader array of people. My nephew's kids had friends ... who were all white, middle-class, and Catholic, just like them. When I was in public school, several of my best friends were either ethnically, religiously and/or economically quite different from myself. I've always treasured that aspect of my school experience.

 

6 hours ago, Carol the Dabbler said:
7 hours ago, Van Buren Supernova said:

at the end, I did advice her to go with the one the daughter is passionate about, because without it, everything means nothing. Some people hate studying and some can't imagine living without it.

What do you guy think?

I think you gave good advice.

I agree.

 

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6 hours ago, Arcadia said:

I worry that they are not being exposed to a broader array of people. My nephew's kids had friends ... who were all white, middle-class, and Catholic, just like them.

That mightn't be much different if they attended a regular Catholic school, though, and I've never heard that argument used against such institutions.  I grew up in a 99.9% white agricultural area, but what with television and then going off to college or jobs or the military, most of us have become acquainted with quite an assortment of people.

There's one factor that never seems to be mentioned in conversations about diversity, so I'm curious -- would you be so concerned if their friends were all politically liberal?

 

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Can only speak for myself, of course, but kids in homogeneous peer groups are missing out, imo. I was in that situation myself as a teen - I should perhaps explain that Austria has this unfortunate school system that separates kids after fourth grade, a bit like the old British system of grammar and secondary modern schools, only we still have them, with only a handful of comprehensives. :unsure: So suburban me went to a so-called AHS school (think grammar school) with classmates from mostly similar backgrounds (lower middle to middle class families, reasonably educated, moderately liberal, mostly white, with a handful of second-gen migrant kids who were already born here and spoke German flawlessly). I was already in my first year at uni when I had closer contact to folks my age who (the other common choice round here) finished school at 15 then started vocational training - and only because of my hobby, pen&paper roleplaying, which attracted a wild mix of nerds. What an eye-opener that was ... meeting people with different lives, different problems, different political affiliations, different worldviews (yet united by our love of geekdom :D ).

I don't have kids, but if I had any, I'd want them to meet (and hopefully befriend) all kinds of kids in their formative years. Rich, poor, local, migrant, liberal, conservative, how can you learn from and/or empathize with someone who's just a distant idea to you?

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5 hours ago, Carol the Dabbler said:

That mightn't be much different if they attended a regular Catholic school, though, and I've never heard that argument used against such institutions.

I would.

5 hours ago, Carol the Dabbler said:

There's one factor that never seems to be mentioned in conversations about diversity, so I'm curious -- would you be so concerned if their friends were all politically liberal?

Well, they were only 6 and 8 at the time, I doubt if their friends mentioned politics. :smile: Seriously, I have no idea how liberal or conservative the families in question were. I just noticed they were interchangeable, in an area where diversity (of all kinds) is more common than weeds. I don't think that would have been the case if they had been attending school; for example, kids of mixed races hanging out together are a common sight in town (which is a five minute walk from the schools, which is why I assume that's where they met.)

So, the answer is ... I imagine I would be as concerned, since politics wasn't a conscious factor in my thinking. But unconciously, who knows.

5 hours ago, Caya said:

Can only speak for myself, of course, but kids in homogeneous peer groups are missing out, imo. I was in that situation myself as a teen - I should perhaps explain that Austria has this unfortunate school system that separates kids after fourth grade, a bit like the old British system of grammar and secondary modern schools, only we still have them, with only a handful of comprehensives. :unsure: So suburban me went to a so-called AHS school (think grammar school) with classmates from mostly similar backgrounds (lower middle to middle class families, reasonably educated, moderately liberal, mostly white, with a handful of second-gen migrant kids who were already born here and spoke German flawlessly). I was already in my first year at uni when I had closer contact to folks my age who (the other common choice round here) finished school at 15 then started vocational training - and only because of my hobby, pen&paper roleplaying, which attracted a wild mix of nerds. What an eye-opener that was ... meeting people with different lives, different problems, different political affiliations, different worldviews (yet united by our love of geekdom :D ).

I don't have kids, but if I had any, I'd want them to meet (and hopefully befriend) all kinds of kids in their formative years. Rich, poor, local, migrant, liberal, conservative, how can you learn from and/or empathize with someone who's just a distant idea to you?

Very different from my experience! Because we moved so often, and even spent a few years out of the country, I think I was exposed to about every demographic there is before I was thirteen. I admit I didn't value the experience at the time. :smile: But I do now.

When I moved to this area, I was amazed by how insular so many people were. (Even the liberal ones!) I'm sure a lot of factors go into that; for one thing, I was used to living in a college town; it was a cultural mecca compared to this area. At least, at the time. Our proximity to DC is starting to change this area significantly. The exploding population = more diversity = demand for more diverse activities/attitudes/policies. It suits me, but I see how fearful the "old timers" are ... partly because this is their first exposure to it. I can't help but think if they'd been exposed to more diversity when they were younger, they'd be more comfortable with it now. To be fair, I'm sure most of them went to public school; there just wasn't much diversity to be had back then! But there is now, and I can't help but think most kids would benefit from it.

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I won't disagree that having friends and acquaintances from a variety of backgrounds helps make a person well rounded.  On the other hand, I don't think it makes sense to force that sort of thing on people "for their own good" -- busing them to distant schools, for example.

And as you said, Arcadia, even if you don't go looking for variety, it's likely to come looking for you eventually.  Goodness knows that's true around here.  We live in a small (about 20 households) not-at-all-fancy housing development in a rural area, where you'd expect to be surrounded by local types -- and there are a number of those.  But there's also a Mexican family, and there's a family from China that plans to build as soon as their youngest graduates from high school.  Oh, and there's a German woman who's married to an American.  It's not exactly cosmopolitan, but I'm pleasantly surprised.

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Well, I don't think any of us were talking about "forcing" interactions ... just reflecting on the pros and cons of home schooling. And I do think that's a downside that people should consider when homeschooling.

I also knew people who homeschooled primarily for that reason ... they didn't want their kids to have "outside influences." Their right, but I pitied their children. They were odd little creatures, too, poor things.

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