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Post any thoughts/reactions/gossip about this year's Oscar race, nominees or telecast here!

The Oscars lost their shine for me years ago (1998 to be exact) . . but it's still Hollywood's Prom and the red carpet event of the year.  

Even for those who still love and follow every show, every year sees some glitch or controversy marring the proceedings, sometimes before they even get underway, and this year is no exception.

Found this on Yahoo:

https://www.msn.com/en-us/movies/oscars/oscar-nominees-furious-over-exclusion-from-telecast-another-slap-in-the-face/ar-BBTvsWF

The Academy has announced that in an effort to keep the telecast to a 'brisk 3 hours' (yeah, this is what they shoot for every year and fail) four awards will be issued during what for the viewing audience will be commercial breaks, in order to trim broadcast time.  The awards selected for obscurity are:  Best Hair & Makeup (combined into one award); Best Action Short; Best Film Editing and . . .Best Cinematography.   While most of the viewing world may not give a hang about 'Best Action Short' .  . . this decision represents a major snub to two of the major cinematic awards and one artistic award.  The cinematographer (or DP) functions as the director of a film's whole visual look, and the Best Cinematography is therefore equivalent to a Best Director for a DP.  This we are going to shunt off to a commercial break?  Six-time nominee (also this year), Caleb Deschanel argues, "Movies started with a guy cranking a camera--a cinematographer!"  Veteran DP Roger Deakins finally won last year after multiple nominations and received a standing ovation for what was considered the highlight of last year's show.  So of *course* the logical thing to do is to remove the Cinematography award from the viewing public the following year!

Here's a thought, Academy:  Cut out 4 of the 6 or so excruciatingly painful musical numbers and reinstate these awards!  Not that I will likely be watching, unless I tune in to see how 'A Star is Born' fares.

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On 2/13/2019 at 9:17 AM, Hikari said:

Here's a thought, Academy:  Cut out 4 of the 6 or so excruciatingly painful musical numbers and reinstate these awards!

I was just about to make a similar suggestion -- until you said it for me.  Yeah, the last few times I've actually had any interest in that hoopla, there was so much time dedicated to gratuitous "entertainment" that the actual award presentations seemed an afterthought.  News flash to the Academy:  People watch the show to see their favorite stars, and to see who won.  So announce the candidates, show us clips from each, announce the winners, and let them (or their representative)* say thank you.  Then maybe let the MC crack a couple brief jokes, and on to the next category.

But the Academy does seem to know that already, which is presumably why they save the "best" awards till last, lest viewers just see which movie won, then turn off the tv and go to bed.  So why do they persist in boring us between awards?  Are they thoughtfully allowing time for a refrigerator raid or a bathroom break?

* I noticed a few years ago that they (or maybe I'm thinking of the Emmys) seem to have done away with the option of letting the award be accepted by an absent artist's representative.  Now the Academy accepts it on the artist's behalf, which is not only meaningless, it prevents us from seeing someone who actually cares about the win have a say -- and/or read a carefully-prepared statement from a winner who's busy filming elsewhere.  Bleh.

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I have just read that due to the backlash it has received, the Academy has reinstated the four awards into the broadcast, after attempting to play hardball initially and saying the awards were staying out regardless of how unhappy people were about it.  Now it has caved to the pressure.

I'm on Team BraGa for 'A Star is Born' but I really don't think I need to watch this year.  Which will continue the trend I've had going for about 10 years now.

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Wow,  well, the Oscars have come and gone.  I was so uninvested this year I didn't even realize they were happening last night.

I spent the evening watching 'Big Bang Theory' episodes and a retread of 1992's Last of the Mohicans, the Director's Cut.  It was a more entertaining evening than I would have had watching the Academy Awards.

The evening was a mixed bag, with the major awards spread around fairly evenly.  No one film dominated.  I guess this is a good thing, but the big winners were all news to me.   Roma Green Book?  I had not heard of either of these two movies before today.

Not a surprise:  Lady Gaga and Bradley Cooper won Best Original Song for their 'Shallow'.  It was the only award 'A Star is Born' received, after some heavy pre-Oscar buzz for Gaga and for Cooper's directorial effort.

Surprise:  Gaga was not a factor in the Best Actress race.  Olivia Colman edged Glenn Close for that honor.  I'll be watching 'The Favourite' at my first opportunity.  I'm glad for Colman; bit shocked that the veteran multi-nominee Close didn't win, after tying with Gaga at the Golden Globes.

Not a surprise: Black Panther, a Best Picture contender, did not win.  It won for Best Score, so that's something to comfort the Marvel fans.  Its nomination was a surprise in the first place, but in the end, the Academy couldn't bring itself to be quite that populist.  

Surprise:  Rami Malek winning for his turn as Freddie Mercury in Bohemian Rhapsody.  No offense to him; I fully expected Christian Bale to win for Vice.

After some mild controversy re. the airing of certain awards, this year's telecast turned out to be pretty non-eventful.

************************

Here is the full list of 2019’s Academy Award winners:

Documentary (Feature) — Jimmy Chin and Elizabeth Chai Vasarhelyi, Free Solo

Actress in a Supporting Role — Regina King, If Beale Street Could Talk

Makeup and Hairstyling — Greg Cannom, Kate Biscoe, and Patricia Dehaney, Vice

Costume Design — Ruth E. Carter, Black Panther

Production Design — Hannah Beachler and Jay Hart, Black Panther

Cinematography — Alfonso Cuarón, Roma

Sound Editing — John Warhurst, Bohemian Rhapsody

Sound Mixing — Paul Massey, Tim Cavagin, and John Casali, Bohemian Rhapsody

Foreign Language Film — Alfonso Cuarón, Roma

Film Editing — John Ottman, Bohemian Rhapsody

Actor in a Supporting Role — Mahershala Ali, Green Book

Animated Feature Film — Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse, Bob Persichetti, Peter Ramsey, Rodney Rothman

Animated Short Film — Domee Shi, Bao

Documentary Short Subject — Rayka Zehtabchi and Melissa Berton, Period. End of Sentence.

Visual Effects — Paul Lambert, Ian Hunter, Tristan Myles and J.D. Schwalm, First Man

Live Action Short Film — Guy Nattiv and Jamie Ray Newman, Skin

Best Original Screenplay — Nick Vallelonga, Brian Currie, Peter Farrelly, Green Book

Best Adapted Screenplay — Spike Lee, Sean McKittrick, Jason Blum, Raymond Mansfield, Jordan Peele, BlacKkKlansman

Original Score — Ludwig Goransson, Black Panther

Original Song — Lady Gaga, Mark Ronson, Anthony Rossomando, and Andrew Wyatt, “Shallow,” A Star Is Born

Best Actor in a Leading Role — Rami Malek, Bohemian Rhapsody

Best Actress in a Leading Role — Olivia Colman, The Favourite

Best Director — Alfonso Cuarón, Roma

Best Picture — Green Book

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Thanks for the breakdown!  I'm happy enough with the way things turned out.  I still would have picked "Bohemian Rhapsody" for Best Picture, but "Green Book" was a close second.  And I'm happy to see that Rami Malek and Mahershala Ali both won awards for their performances.  Well deserved.

I didn't get a chance to see "The Favourite" in theaters, but I really wanted to.  I'll probably rent it sometime.

I'm not at all surprised that "Black Panther" didn't make Best Picture; I would have been more surprised if it had, simply because of its genre.  Hollywood doesn't usually appreciate fantasy/sci-fi/action-adventure.  The only reason it even had a shot was because the black cast was such a big deal.  I wouldn't be shocked if "Captain Marvel" had a nomination for next year's awards, for starring a woman.  They're making a huge deal out of the fact that she's a woman.  They even pushed out the release date just so they could release it on International Women's Day.  I'd love to see a Marvel movie win Best Picture, but in recognition of the quality and entertainment of the movie, not the politics.

 

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I am glad to hear that Green Book won.  Haven't seen it myself, but it sounds interesting (and it co-stars Viggo Mortensen), so I might order the DVD.

I didn't even know that Olivia Colman was in a Big Picture.  Hooray for her!  If her early work is anything to go by, she deserves it.  What is The Favourite about?

In addition to Original Score, Black Panther also won for Costume Design and Production Design.  Not bad.

 

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On 2/25/2019 at 11:21 PM, Carol the Dabbler said:

I am glad to hear that Green Book won.  Haven't seen it myself, but it sounds interesting (and it co-stars Viggo Mortensen), so I might order the DVD.

I didn't even know that Olivia Colman was in a Big Picture.  Hooray for her!  If her early work is anything to go by, she deserves it.  What is The Favourite about?

In addition to Original Score, Black Panther also won for Costume Design and Production Design.  Not bad.

 

The Favourite is being called 'an historical black comedy' centering around the brief reign (1707 - 1714) of Queen Anne, the daughter of James II and the last Stuart monarch.  Anne was frail, ultimately succumbing at the age of 49 to the ills that had plagued her all  her life.  The movie depicts a frivolous woman who has a bunch of weird hobbies and would rather play with her 17 pet rabbits than govern, and who gets embroiled in a homoerotic lesbian love triangle with two of her courtiers.  This would seem to be a disservice to Anne, who was said to have had a great interest in statecraft and the arts, as well as being very popular with her subjects.  But playing her as a neurotic froot loop garnered Olivia Colman an Oscar and it's past time Colman was rewarded for her talent.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anne,_Queen_of_Great_Britain

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I'm just happy I'd actually seen some of the winners for a change. :smile: I thought Green Book was terrific, so … yay!

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I have ordered the Green Book -- not the movie, the actual book.  Amazon offers facsimile editions from four years (1940, 1954, 1959, and 1963-64), plus a compendium volume of all four in 50% larger type.  I'm interested to see how Indiana (and other places) looked back then from the black motorist's perspective.  Will post a review.

 

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On 3/6/2019 at 11:00 PM, Carol the Dabbler said:

I have ordered the Green Book -- not the movie, the actual book.  Amazon offers facsimile editions from four years (1940, 1954, 1959, and 1963-64), plus a compendium volume of all four in 50% larger type.  I'm interested to see how Indiana (and other places) looked back then from the black motorist's perspective.  Will post a review.

 

Sounds interesting, Carol.  Indiana had to be a tad more welcoming than the Deep South, if only just.  Even in places as theoretically progressive as New York City, African-American performers were not allowed to dine in or stay at the deluxe supper clubs and hotels where they were the marquee-billed talent.   They weren't even allowed to use the front entrance, but had to sneak in and out of a service door like criminals.   Ironic, no?

My mother relates the time, as a young-20something office girl in the late 1950s, going to Florida with some friends from work, and how they were absolutely mortified when a white bus driver ordered some black passengers to get up and move to the back so the white tourists could sit down.  They tried to demur, insisting they were absolutely fine to sit anywhere, but the driver wouldn't move the bus until the black passengers complied.

My mother and her friends all hailed from a tiny Michigan town and they had not seen segregation in action because there were no black people there.  Their eyes were opened.

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That bus driver wasn't being arbitrary -- I believe that was the law back then in many southern areas.  *shudder*

As you may have seen in the Amazon listings, it's called the Green Book for two reasons.  Obviously the cover is green, but that's presumably because the author's name was Victor H. Green.

I had assumed that he rated various hotels, restaurants, etc., but after seeing the book, I think he listed only those establishments that were known to be black-friendly (with many presumably being black owned and operated).  That enabled the book to be brief and to the point.  Each listing consists of just a name and address (no phone numbers), and they are grouped by state, town, and category; these brief listings appear to have been published for free (larger ads were available for a fee).

Many of the accommodations are categorized as "tourist homes" and are listed as a person's name (generally a woman), so I take them to be private homes that were willing to take in tourists, what would be called a bed & breakfast nowadays.  There are also a number of YM and YWCA's listed, plus some hotels.  Very few of the listings appear to be for large establishments.

I have the Compendium of four annual editions, and even though the typeface is small (about 15-20 characters per inch), it's nonetheless (according to Amazon) 50% larger than in the original annuals.  I assume that the books were intentionally kept small, to be easy to take along (and perhaps also to be inconspicuous).  In fact the book encourages the reader to carry it, and to "use it as your identification."

In addition to the listings I've already mentioned, some editions also have special sections listing black colleges (primarily in the South, where blacks were not allowed to attend white schools -- even those that were supported by the taxes they paid) and black newspapers, as well as "infomercials" from gas and auto companies who sponsored the book.

Wikipedia has an article describing not only the book itself, but also the era that necessitated it.  It's a sobering read.

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