Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Carol the Dabbler

Interesting quotations (on any subject)

Recommended Posts

I just came across this quote (or apparently a paraphrase) on a gardening forum, and am wondering what y'all might think of it:

The intuitive mind is a gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. But we have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift.
(paraphrased) Albert Einstein

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh dear, you're going to make us use our brains, aren't you? Urghh…..

I'm not sure, at this point in history, that I accept the premise that society honors the rational mind. At the moment, I'm more inclined to believe that we've all gone stark raving nuts. (Present company excepted, of course. :D

I'll agree that the intuitive mind is a gift. But I don't see a flaw in honoring the servant, either. Can't we honor both? Oh, wait, what am I saying, that would be too rational.....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Arcadia said:

Oh dear, you're going to make us use our brains, aren't you?

Well, I was kinda hoping....

4 hours ago, Arcadia said:

I'm not sure, at this point in history, that I accept the premise that society honors the rational mind. At the moment, I'm more inclined to believe that we've all gone stark raving nuts.

Or stark raving political, more's the pity.  But the quotation dates back several decades, so we may want to analyze it in that context.

4 hours ago, Arcadia said:

I'll agree that the intuitive mind is a gift. But I don't see a flaw in honoring the servant, either. Can't we honor both?

I don't think that the statement was intended to imply that honoring either was a flaw, just that honoring one to the exclusion of the other is a mistake.

*****

Einstein died in 1955, but the author of this article was able to trace anything resembling the quotation back only as far as 1976, in a book by one Bob Samples:

Albert Einstein called the intuitive or metaphoric mind a sacred gift. He added that the rational mind was a faithful servant. It is paradoxical that in the context of modern life we have begun to worship the servant and defile the divine.

So Mr Samples attributes the "gift" and "servant" analogies to Einstein, but the full quotation, especially the final sentence, seems to have originated many years later, in his own book.  That doesn't mean it's not worth thinking about, of course.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've always liked the Baha'i analogy of science and faith being the two wings of the same bird; the bird can't fly without both of them. I think that works analogy for intuition and rationality too. Whether we're promoting one over the other at the moment (or in Einstein's time) …. I don't know. Sometimes it's hard to distinguish what drives our stupidest impulses. Certainly "rational" arguments have been used many times to justify heinous actions, but that doesn't mean the actions weren't actually an intuitive response to something.

All I'm saying is … I'm not sure whether we can actually judge whether we're really favoring rationality … or just pretending to because we "think" rationality is "superior." Although maybe that amounts to the same thing as "honoring the servant" to the exclusion of heeding intuition. But I kind of doubt it …  my intuition tells me :smile: that people are generally hard-wired to employ both intuition and reason, but are not good at distinguishing between the two.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Arcadia said:

... my intuition tells me :smile: that people are generally hard-wired to employ both intuition and reason, but are not good at distinguishing between the two.

That's a good question, and I think you may well have a good point.

As I've said before, I have the impression that Sherlock (in the BBC series at any rate) isn't nearly as pure-logic as he seems to think he is; that his elaborate "deductions" are actually flashes of insight strung together with logic.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't they even kind of address that themselves in T6T? When Sherlock sees the Thatcher bust, and some instinct tells him it's important. And then he has that conversation with Mycroft about being able to predict anything, if you just know enough. Which I'm skeptical of, but Sherlock seemed earnest about it. :smile: 

Oh dear … somehow I just made my keyboard light up, and I don't know how to turn it off! Had no idea such a feature even existed! Kind of pretty.....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Arcadia said:

Don't they even kind of address that themselves in T6T? When Sherlock sees the Thatcher bust, and some instinct tells him it's important. And then he has that conversation with Mycroft about being able to predict anything, if you just know enough. Which I'm skeptical of....

If "knowing enough" includes the butterfly effect, he's presumably correct in a technical sort of way -- though I don't see how a person could be sure that they had actually gotten all the facts and/or how they could gather the information quickly enough to deduce before the situation changed.  So from a practical standpoint, I'm skeptical too.

Anyhow, yes, I think they've hinted at Sherlock's intuition several times.  Just don't ask me to list them!

6 hours ago, Arcadia said:

Oh dear … somehow I just made my keyboard light up, and I don't know how to turn it off! Had no idea such a feature even existed! Kind of pretty....

I've never heard of such a thing either.  It's not ticking, is it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's a video about how to turn your keyboard backlight on/off.  Warning: it starts out kinda loud!  And apparently different computers use different function keys for this.

 

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/7/2019 at 1:53 PM, Carol the Dabbler said:

It's not ticking, is it?

:D No. Thank goodness.

Actually, shortly after I left last night, I googled the same thing as  you and found the right button. It even has the diagram of a lit up keyboard on it! (Not that I would have realized what that image meant if I hadn't learned its function first. :smile: ) That's the first time I've realized all the little f1, f2 etc. keys don't exist on this keyboard (not that I care, I never had any use for them anyway); it's all these little keys with pictographs instead, and they control things like volume and video playback, etc. Which I actually find kind of neat. Not that I'll ever use them, I bet; too used to doing everything the old fashioned way.

The mystery to me is how I ever hit one of those "function" buttons in the first place, as my hand was down near the shift key at the moment of activation...… Delayed response, maybe. I've discovered this new machine is pretty slow compared to others I've had. I'm seriously thinking of getting a different one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Arcadia said:

... all the little f1, f2 etc. keys don't exist on this keyboard (not that I care, I never had any use for them anyway); it's all these little keys with pictographs instead....

I'm guessing it's the same thing, only marked differently.  On my computer, they're labeled with the f-number (very tiny in the upper left-hand corner) *and* the pictograph (larger and centered).

I would play around with those keys to see what they do -- but then what if a} I can't figure out what one of them did, and/or b} I can't figure out how to undid it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ah, I see ... there are indeed tiny little markings in the upper left corner of each of those keys, which may indeed be f1, f2, etc. Or not.... (I would love to have a SERIOUS talk with the geniuses who think it's a good idea to put gray letters on black keys in 4 point type.)

I did, in fact, go ahead and push every button. Most of them you just push again to turn off whatever feature it initiates (like the keyboard lights), some you just push the button next to it (like the volume; up/down). And some didn't do anything, I presume because I didn't have the corresponding, uh, app? ... in service at the time. So push away, you can't do much damage.

Oh, and there's one that brings up a menu for something or another; you just click somewhere else on the screen to get rid of It, like most menus.

Hmmm, there's one near the right side called "end." I haven't pushed that one yet. Let me save this first before I try it. :D 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Whew. It just goes to the bottom of the page. So "end" is opposite of "home." Got it.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
53 minutes ago, Arcadia said:

I would love to have a SERIOUS talk with the geniuses who think it's a good idea to put gray letters on black keys in 4 point type.

Ditto for website designers!!!

 

53 minutes ago, Arcadia said:

there's one near the right side called "end." I haven't pushed that one yet

 

52 minutes ago, Arcadia said:

Whew. It just goes to the bottom of the page. So "end" is opposite of "home."

 

I still haven't acquired the habit of using Home, not sure why.  It and End seem useful enough, and would save me a lot of time scrolling.  New Year's resolution, maybe?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have too many other things I need to learn, so acquiring an extra four methods for navigating my laptop is rather low on my list. :D 

Besides, I am, at best, only a middling typist. The chance that I would strike the wrong key is rather high. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/3/2019 at 10:18 PM, Arcadia said:

my intuition tells me :smile: that people are generally hard-wired to employ both intuition and reason, but are not good at distinguishing between the two.

 

On 11/4/2019 at 12:26 AM, Carol the Dabbler said:

I have the impression that Sherlock (in the BBC series at any rate) isn't nearly as pure-logic as he seems to think he is; that his elaborate "deductions" are actually flashes of insight strung together with logic.

 

I had a look at the Study in Pink thread earlier today, and saw that Tim had quoted the BBC episode synopsis in the very first post, which includes this sentence:  "The two men couldn't be more different, but Sherlock's inspired leaps of intellect coupled with John's pragmatism soon forge an unbreakable alliance."

I love that phrase, "inspired leaps of intellect."  Just about sums it up, I think.  Wonder who came up with it?  Presumably the Moftisses?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of UseWe have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.Privacy PolicyGuidelines.