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daffodilkhan

To Scheme for Mortal Thrones...

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Ha ha! You fell victim to one of the classic blunders - the most famous of which is "never get involved in a land war in Asia" - but only slightly less known is "never click on clickbait when death is on the line!

Death might be a little extreme. Pride? I've always felt a little chagrined when I click on one of those ridiculous "news" articles that very clearly hooked me with the internet equivalent of a PT Barnum peanut pitch. "never click on clickbait when pride is on the line" just doesn't have the same effect does it? 

Now for the promised introduction - which I suppose makes me better than clickbait since those blasted things rarely deliver on their promises.

Hello! Longtime Holmesian, first time poster. I started reading Sherlock Holmes stories when I was about 9 - after I saw some of the Granada series on PBS. For me, few mystery stories can compete with those told by Dr. Watson. (I'm not a Doyalist; besides, who doesn't love the Great Game?) After finishing all of the original stories, I started to work my way through many of the pastiches and homages published over the years. Most recently, I found the Cthulhu Casebooks by James Lovegrove which tell three Sherlock stories through a Lovecraftian lens. I'm also a fan of several police procedural shows 🍍

Beyond Sherlock Holmes, I'm an avid science fiction fan (film, tv, and print) as well as the genre of good-bad movies that is as hard to quantify as they sometimes are to watch.

IRL I work in a children's library and read storytime to infants and toddlers - well, I did before COVID. Now, I mostly clean and sanitize things. 

Edited by Carol the Dabbler
Second part of text was scarcely visible on the Dark Theme.
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Hello, daffodilkhan -- welcome to Sherlock Forum!  :welcome:

7 hours ago, daffodilkhan said:

I work in a children's library

There's something I've been curious about for a number of years.  My two main fandoms have been Star Trek and Sherlock, and out of the few members of each fandom whose jobs I've been aware of, there have been several children's librarians, and I can't help wondering why.  (Especially since I don't recall one single librarian of any other type.)  Do you have any ideas?

 

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45 minutes ago, Carol the Dabbler said:

My two main fandoms have been Star Trek and Sherlock, and out of the few members of each fandom whose jobs I've been aware of, there have been several children's librarians, and I can't help wondering why.  (Especially since I don't recall one single librarian of any other type.)

Just to be a fly in the ointment, I have worked in a library and not as a children's librarian.

I've no idea why you might be encountering this phenomenon.  If I had to venture a guess, I'd say that people who become children's librarians are fond of their own childhood memories involving books and stories, and there's likely a correlation between being a lover of fiction and being part of a fandom.  People who join fandoms tend to be imaginative, and that's practically the realm of children.

Could also just be a coincidence.

 

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Sorry, Arcadia, now that you mention it, I do recall you saying you'd worked in a library.  So I shall reword my prior statement to say that I've encountered not only more children's librarians than other librarians, but also more children's librarians than I would guess could be accounted for by their numbers in society at large.

33 minutes ago, Artemis said:

If I had to venture a guess, I'd say that people who become children's librarians are fond of their own childhood memories involving books and stories, and there's likely a correlation between being a lover of fiction and being part of a fandom.  People who join fandoms tend to be imaginative, and that's practically the realm of children.

Yes, and I was thinking of saying it could be correlated to a sense of wonder.

Maybe daffodilkhan and our other resident children's librarians have some additional ideas.

 

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I think children's librarianship attracts people who feel driven to encourage the passions of others. In the grown-up/adult section, most patrons just want to browse their books and be left - for the most part - alone in the stacks. Children sometimes want a little space, but often they just want someone to listen to them while they ramble on about something that excites them.  Children's librarians listen, share our own experiences, and try to encourage our little patrons to find what they enjoy and revel in it.

Fandom is the grown-up and not-so-grown-up version of this same thing. We share our own excitement and take time to enjoy the excitement of others. I don't know if that's true of all children's librarians, but most of my coworkers in the children's library have their own fandoms to follow: one is a die hard B-movie aficionado, another loves all things music and homesteading, and our teen librarian is into a little bit of everything from anime to Sherlock to Star Trek and beyond!

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I like your answer, DK -- fans are just grown-up little kids!  :bouncy:  Hooray for us!

 

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4 hours ago, Carol the Dabbler said:

fans are just grown-up little kids!  :bouncy: 

Yes!  That’s kind of where I was going in my response, but I couldn’t find the right words.

16 hours ago, Carol the Dabbler said:

Sorry, Arcadia,

You have summoned her!  :D 

 

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2 hours ago, Artemis said:

Yes!  That’s kind of where I was going in my response, but I couldn’t find the right words.

I just finished an online class  for my yearly training requirements. One of the essay questions we had to answer was: what kind of people do you believe are drawn to librarianship? Mostly I just summarized my paper. 

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On 9/23/2020 at 12:11 AM, Carol the Dabbler said:

Sorry, Arcadia, now that you mention it, I do recall you saying you'd worked in a library.

 

On 9/23/2020 at 4:38 PM, Artemis said:

You have summoned her!  :D 

Hello! You rang?

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On 9/23/2020 at 3:32 AM, daffodilkhan said:

Now, I mostly clean and sanitize things.

Is the pay good? Sign me up!

I have been doing that since before Covid and noone pay me more than stink eye.

 

If I have to guess: introvert who hate noise and talking people or a hidden sadist who enjoy seeing people struggling with physical catalogs. I lean on the second :P   (I am still scarred of a librarian who grinned happily, you could see sudden color and spark in her bored eyes, when it was ten minutes before closing time, after I took three hour bus, asking her to help me find a book, this was time before digital and internet). And no, she didn't help me at all, but grinned the whole ten minutes. I failed to find the book, they kick me out for closing, I had to take three hours bus ride back to the uni, and missed two classes.

 

Anyway, anything involves working with children, I salute you. I am not bad with children, but I have constant worry that they would find out that I'm scared of them. Terrified.

 

 

 

 

 

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3 hours ago, Van Buren Supernova said:

Is the pay good? Sign me up!

Not in my experience, lol.

3 hours ago, Van Buren Supernova said:

If I have to guess: introvert who hate noise and talking people

It’s funny that you think libraries don’t have noise or talking people.  :P  Academic libraries are still relatively quiet, but public libraries?  Not here, for sure.  Especially if you’ve got kids in there.  And you’re not allowed to shush people anymore, lol.

On 9/23/2020 at 6:26 PM, daffodilkhan said:

One of the essay questions we had to answer was: what kind of people do you believe are drawn to librarianship?

Why were they asking that?

 

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9 hours ago, Van Buren Supernova said:

she didn't help me at all, but grinned the whole ten minutes. I failed to find the book, they kick me out for closing, I had to take three hours bus ride back to the uni, and missed two classes.

I would guess that many librarians go into that line of work because they're more comfortable with books than with people.  But the ones I've encountered have seemed very eager to do anything involving books, including help people find them.  So I'd guess that your sadist is an unfortunately exception to that norm.  And shame on her, I say!

On the other hand, maybe she thought you were simply one of those thoughtless people who come in ten minutes before closing, expecting the staff to drop everything and help them.  There certainly are people like that, unfortunately.  Maybe she had no idea that, because of the bus schedule, that was the only time you could have arrived.

Or, on the other other hand, maybe she really was a sadist.

 

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On 9/26/2020 at 3:10 PM, Carol the Dabbler said:

I would guess that many librarians go into that line of work because they're more comfortable with books than with people. 

I think a lot of aspiring librarians start off with that idea, but will eventually drop off as they find, through working the field, that it’s actually very people-oriented work.  Not all of it; there are some librarians who stay more or less behind the curtain.  But the librarians you interact with are basically in customer service roles.  That’s one of the reasons I stopped doing it (only to end up in another people-oriented job, alas).  It was too close to my experience working in retail.

On 9/26/2020 at 3:10 PM, Carol the Dabbler said:

On the other hand, maybe she thought you were simply one of those thoughtless people who come in ten minutes before closing, expecting the staff to drop everything and help them.

Yeah, that’s what I would have thought.  I absolutely hate it when people do that, and being totally honest, I would have been very unhappy about it.  You would never know that, because unlike sadist lady, I would have been outwardly friendly and helpful.  But internally I would have been thinking, “I’m going to rant about this in the ‘Shoot the Wall’ thread later.”  

Speaking of which, that happened to me just today at the funeral home.  It was 5 minutes to closing, I was just about to lock the doors, and a group walked in wanting a tour of our facilities.
 

tenor.gif


Luckily a tour only takes about 20-30 minutes.  I've had people stay over an hour after closing, in just about every place I've worked.

 

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3 hours ago, Artemis said:

 It was 5 minutes to closing, I was just about to lock the doors, and a group walked in wanting a tour of our facilities.  Luckily a tour only takes about 20-30 minutes.

And (in any business that deals with the public) you can't very well tell them to come back at a more convenient time, because -- well, public relations.  Who knows if they might soon be in a position to choose your establishment?

Come to think of it, I've never held a job where that sort of thing was likely to happen.  (I've been a high-school teacher, an office worker, and a software engineer.)

 

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9 minutes ago, Carol the Dabbler said:

And (in any business that deals with the public) you can't very well tell them to come back at a more convenient time, because -- well, public relations.  Who knows if they might soon be in a position to choose your establishment?

Yeah, exactly.  That’s what’s making it difficult to enforce the Covid restrictions, too.  If someone fights me on it and I push back too hard, they could be spiteful and leave a bad review for our establishment.  If that happens because of something that occurred on my watch, I’d almost certainly be let go.  Reputation is everything in the industry.

21 minutes ago, Carol the Dabbler said:

Come to think of it, I've never held a job where that sort of thing was likely to happen.

That’s the kind of job I want but can never seem to get, lol.  Other than the contract work I’ve done from home, of course.

 

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On 9/27/2020 at 4:10 AM, Carol the Dabbler said:

On the other hand, maybe she thought you were simply one of those thoughtless people who come in ten minutes before closing, expecting the staff to drop everything and help them.  There certainly are people like that, unfortunately.  Maybe she had no idea that, because of the bus schedule, that was the only time you could have arrived.

Or, on the other other hand, maybe she really was a sadist.

 

On 9/27/2020 at 6:35 AM, Artemis said:

Yeah, that’s what I would have thought.  I absolutely hate it when people do that, and being totally honest, I would have been very unhappy about it.  You would never know that, because unlike sadist lady, I would have been outwardly friendly and helpful.  But internally I would have been thinking, “I’m going to rant about this in the ‘Shoot the Wall’ thread later.”

 

Oh she was a sadist, that is confirmed! I have to emphasize that I was going through the catalogue myself, and it was hellish because the manual-ity and not knowing whether it should be literature, autobiography or the field of work, it's kind of mixed up and the code of the physical placement of the book was not exactly friendly alphanumeric something something too that I got multiple codes, and there the place was full of rows and rows of looooong shelves, falling apart yellowish book (the one I was looking for was an old, not exactly a popular read and rare that I had exhausted other sources), So I asked her how is the best way to find it, then she said I just have to find it myself, and I said but there seemed like I wouldn't have enough time, and that is the moment I remember forever, her face, her eyes behind the specs, and her satisfied (YOU WON'T BAHAHAHA) smile, 22 years and counting. On the plus side, it seemed like I made her day, she seemed alive and happy, lightened up like sunshine.

 

 

On 9/27/2020 at 6:35 AM, Artemis said:

and a group walked in wanting a tour of our facilities.

Do they have death in the family? If not, how often..do people really go window shopping on these?

But I know a lot of funeral home making use of the 'urgency' to quote unreasonable price, since the mourners were less likely to shop around, it kinda makes sense I guess? Still..

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15 minutes ago, Van Buren Supernova said:

Do they have death in the family?

Usually not.  They may be expecting one, if for instance a relative is in hospice; or they may just be looking for themselves.  People can pre-plan their own funerals if they wish.

We had a call from a guy who was 100% positive his father wouldn't last 3 days, so he went ahead and planned everything.  That was almost two years ago now.  His father's folder has been sitting out on our shelf that entire time, glaring awkwardly.

 

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11 hours ago, Van Buren Supernova said:

I was going through the catalogue myself, and it was hellish because the manual-ity and not knowing whether it should be literature, autobiography or the field of work, it's kind of mixed up and the code of the physical placement of the book was not exactly friendly alphanumeric something something too that I got multiple codes, and there the place was full of rows and rows of looooong shelves, falling apart yellowish book (the one I was looking for was an old, not exactly a popular read and rare that I had exhausted other sources),

Oh dear, that does sound awkward.  Fortunately the only time I had access to that sort of collection, the card catalog was pretty straightforward, just by author or by title.

 

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On 9/26/2020 at 6:28 AM, Van Buren Supernova said:

If I have to guess: introvert who hate noise and talking people or a hidden sadist who enjoy seeing people struggling with physical catalogs.

Actually, as an introvert, being a librarian is awful. I don't just shelve books; I have to organize my own programs and help out with other programs as well as offer one-on-one service to help patrons find what they want. We're told to kind of hover around patrons who come in at the last minute - some people try to hide in the stacks or start setting up a base camp at one of the tables. If a staff member is nearby, people are more likely to get what they came for and leave.

Quote

Anyway, anything involves working with children, I salute you. I am not bad with children, but I have constant worry that they would find out that I'm scared of them. Terrified.

 Yeah... until their mid teens, children can smell fear and it excites them. :)

On 9/26/2020 at 9:23 AM, Artemis said:

Why were they asking that?

It was one of those state-paid-for training classes that make you wonder how someone is getting paid for giving it. I felt it was a filler question to pad the "entrance questionnaire".

 

On 9/29/2020 at 3:17 AM, Van Buren Supernova said:

Oh she was a sadist, that is confirmed! I have to emphasize that I was going through the catalogue myself, and it was hellish because the manual-ity and not knowing whether it should be literature, autobiography or the field of work, it's kind of mixed up and the code of the physical placement of the book was not exactly friendly alphanumeric something something too that I got multiple codes...

If it wasn't the Dewey decimal system (F DOY = Fiction, Author: Doyle & 364.973 Sch = Nonfiction, Criminal Justice Today by Schmalleger), it may have been in the Library of Congress system. (PZ3.D772 Si2 PR4622.S44 = The Sign of The Four, A Scandal in Bohemia, and Other Stories  & HV9950 .S35 2005 FT MEADE = Criminal Justice Today by Schmalleger) It seems crazy, but the LC system is designed not only to categorize the books, but also to independently identify the location. It makes sense considering their VAST collection.

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8 minutes ago, daffodilkhan said:

It was one of those state-paid-for training classes that make you wonder how someone is getting paid for giving it.

:lol:
 

8 minutes ago, daffodilkhan said:

Actually, as an introvert, being a librarian is awful.

ef8d87a7b59bc193715a34057f98b1b1bca230ac

 

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I think if I were a librarian, the discomfort due to being an introvert might be largely counterbalanced by the opportunities to show off my knowledge!

 

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2 hours ago, daffodilkhan said:

If it wasn't the Dewey decimal system (F DOY = Fiction, Author: Doyle & 364.973 Sch = Nonfiction, Criminal Justice Today by Schmalleger), it may have been in the Library of Congress system. (PZ3.D772 Si2 PR4622.S44 = The Sign of The Four, A Scandal in Bohemia, and Other Stories  & HV9950 .S35 2005 FT MEADE = Criminal Justice Today by Schmalleger)

I get that, there is a method for this madness :D. I have come to understand a liiitllle bit of it, but at that time, it was probably only the second time I was there, this library, 'serious' library in general. It's way too far from me so mostly I only accessed local uni library which was in their specific field and little collection. I'm very envious with this generation who have internet at their fingertips, and yet we see a lot of things being thrown around without fact check (hidden rant), it's as easy as typing a few words, compared to the blablabla we needed to go through to find one, ONE book.

Anyway, if she didn't grin that much the whole time, I wouldn't mind. I don't want to comment on physicality, but can't resist (we are going this far), I think I remember her very well because of how her eyes lighted at me struggling through her very very thick spec, she has this very unnatural looking bang covering her forehead, cut at straight line right on the eyebrow, and those straight, very straight stiff old fashioned long hair with unnatural very black color (the kind of hair coloring existed that time). She is not young, very skinny so her wrinkles were very obvious through her expression. Sorry I didn't mean anything but to share and hope you guys get the nightm...picture.

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7 hours ago, Carol the Dabbler said:

I think if I were a librarian, the discomfort due to being an introvert might be largely counterbalanced by the opportunities to show off my knowledge!

That's what I thought at first, but the reality was more deflating.  The "knowledge" I got to show off was based on the type of request I got, which was typically as follows:

"What's the name of that book I saw about sports?  The one with the purple cover?"

"What's the name of that movie where Nicolas Cage sells guns?  Is it funny?"

"How many seasons are there in 'House'?  Do you have them all?"

"How do you print from this webpage?"

"How do I open my email?"

"Where's the landscaping section?"

It's mostly a lot of directing people to where they want to go.  Your involvement usually stops there.


Other common questions:

"Why do you organize the library this way?  It doesn't make sense."

"Why aren't you open 24 hours?"

"Why can't I check out this book that someone else requested?  I'm here now, they're not."

"Why can't I use the computer for longer than my allotted time?"

"Do I have to pay my overdue book fees?"

"Where's the bathroom?"

 

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On 10/1/2020 at 11:58 AM, Carol the Dabbler said:

..by the opportunities to show off my knowledge!

Yah, actually, how?

Unless it's showing knowledge about something technical like what Artemis said, do people ask about something else? I would think they would prefer to look at books or web, I would. It's too scary now to ask someone about something, and if it's something factual, I still feel that I have to fact check it.

Unless, it's something fictional, or some kind of shared fandom, otherwise, I also think there is a slim chance to show off knowledge. Nowadays, I think the opportunity only comes when you are able to throw in some fun facts about something in relevant conversation. Something that amazes casual people but when the curious ones fact-check it, you are correct. It doesn't come very often.

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14 hours ago, Van Buren Supernova said:

Yah, actually, how?

Unless it's showing knowledge about something technical...

Well, actually, I meant showing off my knowledge of the Dewey Decimal System (which I assume I'd be an expert on, if I had a degree in Library Science) -- sort of like the young Stephen Moffat, showing off by reading The Complete Sherlock Holmes.  It was intended to be ironic, or something like that, but clearly failed.  Next time I'll be more explicit and include an emotie.

 

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