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Jeremy Brett series episode???


Chris Williams
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Can anyone help please? Trying to identify an episode from the Jeremy Brett series of Sherlock Holmes. A man is seen standing by an upstairs window, when suddenly his face is contorted with horror and he collapses. On entering the room the man is quite dead with no visible injuries. Turns out the floor has holes drilled through it exactly where he was standing in bare feet, and with the pull of a lever in an adjoining room electrified metal spikes can be raised through the holes electrocuting the victim. A shocking experience Watson! ......... but which episode is it???

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Hello Chris -- welcome to Sherlock Forum!   :welcome:

The scene you describe doesn't sound familiar to me, even though I re-watched the entire Brett series just a few years ago.  Admittedly I don't remember everything from those episodes (far from it!), but I'm wondering if the scene you describe might have come from some other adaptation, or even some non-Holmes production.  Hopefully someone with broader experience and/or a more retentive memory will come to your assistance!

With that hope in mind, I'm moving this thread to the Holmes area of the forum, where those folks will be more likely to see it.

 

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Hello Chris,

Welcome to The Sherlock Forum,

That scene that you mention isn’t in the Granada series and it’s not in any of the Canonical Holmes stories. I can’t even think of anything similar. The Man With The Twisted Lip has a scene where Mrs St Clair is walking down a London backstreet when she looks up and sees her husband in an unpairs window. He looks horrified at her seeing him and goes back inside. Maybe you’ve connected this scene to some other movie or tv scene in your memory?

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  • 8 months later...

Hi Everyone. Sorry but I never got notified of these replies and I've only just seen them. I was sure it was a Sherlock Holmes episode. It is exactly as I describe it, I'm absolutely sure of that, the spikes through the floor, electrocution etc. Perhaps it was another detective series but it was shot in the Sherlock Holmes style and era. I was sure it was the Jeremy Brett/Holmes series. Still can't find it. Anymore ideas???

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Hi, Chris -- glad you came back!  If you want to be notified of any future posts on this thread, you can click the Follow button near the top of this page (also make sure to set up your account so you'll get your notifications via email).

There's one possibility that hasn't been mentioned -- you could have dreamed the scene.  I had vivid memories of a brief scene in Star Trek that didn't sound the least bit familiar to anyone else.  Since then I've watched the entire original series several times, and it's simply not in there.  The characters were clearly Spock and McCoy, so it couldn't have been from some other show.  So I assume that I dreamed it.  Well, either that, or I had created a vivid mental image from a story in a fanzine.

 

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Carol the Dabbler, thank you. Got my settings and email wrong, sorted now.

So the mystery continues. No I didn't dream it, remember it vividly as it was such an intriguing storyline. It's just as I described it. So it's not Sherlock Holmes Jeremy Brett series. Tried myself to find this story but still looking. Could be from Armchair Theatre or Thriller???  

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If you remember only that one fairly brief scene, it could be difficult to find unless it was a major plot point.  Best of luck!

 

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3 hours ago, Chris Williams said:

GOT IT!

Jonathan Creek Series 2 Episode 6 Mother Redcap, .......... and it's on BBC iplayer.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/p02zy1bn/jonathan-creek-series-2-6-mother-redcap


:applause:   Hooray -- and congratulations on your perseverance!

I don't recall ever hearing of that show before, so it may never have played in the US.  For anyone else who's in the dark, here's the Wikipedia page: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jonathan_Creek

 

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On 12/5/2021 at 4:04 PM, Carol the Dabbler said:


:applause:   Hooray -- and congratulations on your perseverance!

I don't recall ever hearing of that show before, so it may never have played in the US.  For anyone else who's in the dark, here's the Wikipedia page: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jonathan_Creek

 

I've heard of it but never seen it, but it's been on PBS, I remember seeing the listings. Now I kind wish I'd watched it. :smile: 

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 12/8/2021 at 6:41 AM, Arcadia said:

I've heard of it but never seen it, but it's been on PBS, I remember seeing the listings. Now I kind wish I'd watched it. :smile: 

Jonathan Creek is a delightful show . . at least the first three seasons were.  I will have to dig up my review of the series.  

JC is decidedly in the Sherlock mold, with nods to "Columbo" and a sort of prototype of Sheldon from 'Big Bang Theory.'  He's got a 'Watson', and the dynamic between them was really cute.  When Caroline Quentin left to head up her own series, Alan Davies was paired with a series of different partners and it never quite gelled with the same results.

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Spoiler
Spoiler

 

 

 

Jonathan Creek (BBCTV - 1997 - 2004, with intermittent specials until 2016) takes its name from its eponymous detective, a socially-awkward but brilliant young man (Alan Davies) with exuberant curly hair who lives in a windmill and earns his living by working as an 'engineer of illusions' for a professional stage magician, Adam Klaus, who's as stupid as he is narcissistic.  Klaus is the showman and Jonathan is the guy who actually invents the tricks that are performed on stage.  Jonathan has a distinctive personal style and lives very intensely for his work, just like another Detective we know.  Like that other Detective, he also has a close association with someone who is very good with words on paper, investigative journalist Maddy Magellan (Carolyn Quentin).  Maddy is the polar opposite of Jonathan in every way:  apart from being female, she's brash, loud, pushy and being very fond of food in general and junk food in particular, quite zaftig.  JC, in true Sherlock form is rarely, if ever, seen actually consuming food.  He is more laconic than Sherlock Holmes, but just as observant, with a brain wired up to dismantle the mysteries of science, for entertainment purposes and also in how they relate to the commission of crime.  Jonathan is the most reluctant of consulting detectives, being the shy and retiring sort that is happiest working in solitude on his illusions, but Maddy on the track of a potential story is a force of nature that drags Jonathan along in her wake, oftentimes in a literal sense.

The centerpiece of the show, and the star detective's personal specialty is solving seemingly bizarre crimes (many of them deaths) which have, to all appearances, taken place under impossible conditions--a twist on the classic 'locked room murder'.  Jonathan is a modern update on Sherlock Holmes's maxim that 'Once you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, is the truth.'  Who better to unravel 'impossible' mysteries than a man whose day job it is to concoct impossibilities for gullible audiences?  Using his professional skills, Jonathan unpicks the threads of various crime scenes by working backwards from the result, a similar deductive process he uses when constructing his stage tricks.

The writing and situations are often clever but the real strength of the show is its appealing leading man and his dynamic with his 'Watson'.  Additional opportunities for comedy arise from Maddy's actively desiring Jonathan as more than just a collaborator in crime-solving.  For his part, though his association with Maddy has certainly made his insular existence more varied and interesting, Jonathan finds her overwhelming in too intensive doses and he is certainly Not Interested in anything like That.  Despite an increasingly frustrated Maddy's most transparent efforts to make plain her availability for Whatever, Jonathan is not tuned to that frequency.  A bit like Someone Else we could mention.

Carolyn Quentin departed the show after three seasons to helm her own detective series, Blue Murder (another recommend from me), and Maddy's spot was filled by Julia Sawalha, playing another character.  At this point the charm of the show wore off for me and I did not continue, though some of the Christmas specials were good.  But if you are looking for a late-1990s update on the Golden Age of Crime locked-room mystery, a cosy procedural with a modern sensibility and a charming comedy-romance with some darker undertones, Jonathan Creek fits the bill.

 

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  • 4 weeks later...
On 12/16/2021 at 1:26 PM, Hikari said:

Jonathan Creek is a delightful show . . at least the first three seasons were.  I will have to dig up my review of the series.  

JC is decidedly in the Sherlock mold, with nods to "Columbo" and a sort of prototype of Sheldon from 'Big Bang Theory.'  He's got a 'Watson', and the dynamic between them was really cute.  When Caroline Quentin left to head up her own series, Alan Davies was paired with a series of different partners and it never quite gelled with the same results.

This is one programme that I’ve never gotten around to watching. I haven’t deliberately avoided it for any reason. It sounds good and I’ve often found myself saying “I must have a look.” 

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  • 3 weeks later...
On 12/16/2021 at 8:45 PM, Hikari said:
  Reveal hidden contents
  Reveal hidden contents

 

 

 

Jonathan Creek (BBCTV - 1997 - 2004, with intermittent specials until 2016) takes its name from its eponymous detective, a socially-awkward but brilliant young man (Alan Davies) with exuberant curly hair who lives in a windmill and earns his living by working as an 'engineer of illusions' for a professional stage magician, Adam Klaus, who's as stupid as he is narcissistic.  Klaus is the showman and Jonathan is the guy who actually invents the tricks that are performed on stage.  Jonathan has a distinctive personal style and lives very intensely for his work, just like another Detective we know.  Like that other Detective, he also has a close association with someone who is very good with words on paper, investigative journalist Maddy Magellan (Carolyn Quentin).  Maddy is the polar opposite of Jonathan in every way:  apart from being female, she's brash, loud, pushy and being very fond of food in general and junk food in particular, quite zaftig.  JC, in true Sherlock form is rarely, if ever, seen actually consuming food.  He is more laconic than Sherlock Holmes, but just as observant, with a brain wired up to dismantle the mysteries of science, for entertainment purposes and also in how they relate to the commission of crime.  Jonathan is the most reluctant of consulting detectives, being the shy and retiring sort that is happiest working in solitude on his illusions, but Maddy on the track of a potential story is a force of nature that drags Jonathan along in her wake, oftentimes in a literal sense.

The centerpiece of the show, and the star detective's personal specialty is solving seemingly bizarre crimes (many of them deaths) which have, to all appearances, taken place under impossible conditions--a twist on the classic 'locked room murder'.  Jonathan is a modern update on Sherlock Holmes's maxim that 'Once you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, is the truth.'  Who better to unravel 'impossible' mysteries than a man whose day job it is to concoct impossibilities for gullible audiences?  Using his professional skills, Jonathan unpicks the threads of various crime scenes by working backwards from the result, a similar deductive process he uses when constructing his stage tricks.

The writing and situations are often clever but the real strength of the show is its appealing leading man and his dynamic with his 'Watson'.  Additional opportunities for comedy arise from Maddy's actively desiring Jonathan as more than just a collaborator in crime-solving.  For his part, though his association with Maddy has certainly made his insular existence more varied and interesting, Jonathan finds her overwhelming in too intensive doses and he is certainly Not Interested in anything like That.  Despite an increasingly frustrated Maddy's most transparent efforts to make plain her availability for Whatever, Jonathan is not tuned to that frequency.  A bit like Someone Else we could mention.

Carolyn Quentin departed the show after three seasons to helm her own detective series, Blue Murder (another recommend from me), and Maddy's spot was filled by Julia Sawalha, playing another character.  At this point the charm of the show wore off for me and I did not continue, though some of the Christmas specials were good.  But if you are looking for a late-1990s update on the Golden Age of Crime locked-room mystery, a cosy procedural with a modern sensibility and a charming comedy-romance with some darker undertones, Jonathan Creek fits the bill.

 

I just watched my first episode of Jonathan Creek although I didn’t note the title of the episode. It also starred UK comedy actor John Bluthall playing a Benny Hill type comedian who allegedly committed suicide. I really enjoyed it and will be looking for more. I also want to live in a windmill.

There was one part of the episode where Caroline Quentin suggested an idea of how the suicide might have been staged which reminded me of The Problem Of Thor Bridge. That Holmes bloke gets everywhere.🙂

 

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Jonathan Creek does sound interesting.  I see that there are some episodes on YouTube, though they don't seem to be early ones, where I'd strongly prefer to start.

12 minutes ago, HerlockSholmes said:

It also starred UK comedy actor John Bluthall playing a Benny Hill type comedian who allegedly committed suicide.

Is the series like Murder, She Wrote in the sense that the victim is generally the most annoying character in the episode?

 

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1 hour ago, Carol the Dabbler said:

Jonathan Creek does sound interesting.  I see that there are some episodes on YouTube, though they don't seem to be early ones, where I'd strongly prefer to start.

Is the series like Murder, She Wrote in the sense that the victim is generally the most annoying character in the episode?

 

I’ll have to reserve judgment until I’ve seen more episodes Carol.😄

I never liked Murder She Wrote even though it became staggeringly popular.

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56 minutes ago, HerlockSholmes said:

I never liked Murder She Wrote even though it became staggeringly popular.

Over there too, huh?  I assume your reason for not liking it was this:

On 4/4/2018 at 10:04 AM, HerlockSholmes said:

Ive never really been one for Marple though. I could never get past the ‘why would the police allow an old lady into their investigations?’ question. A bit like ‘Murder She Wrote,’ which I hated.

I really enjoyed it while it was on the air, just one episode per week.  But we're watching it on DVD now, one episode per evening, and now that we're up to season ten, it's kinda starting to get to me.  Quite possibly I should not have read that parody in December:

On 12/4/2021 at 10:35 PM, Carol the Dabbler said:

It's called "The Formula for an Episode of Murder She Wrote" [here], and even though I love the show, I must admit that this writer has it hilariously pegged.

Maybe my current unease is simply due to overexposure, but I'm starting to think that the clues are becoming more tenuous.  During the early seasons I would usually spot at least one clue right when it happened.  Now, though, I'm sometimes lucky to see its relevance even when Jessica points it out.

 

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I guess that a not very believable basic idea isn’t reason for simply dismissing a show but there was something about it that I never liked. Maybe if I gave it a second chance. Many shows have a strange basic ideas of course. Let’s face it, fewer people died at Agincourt than have died in Midsomer🙂 And then we had Rosemary and Thyme over here where 2 gardeners were forever tripping over bodies and insinuating themselves into investigations.

Of all of the USA detectives shows I have to say that Columbo is number one for me although I couldn’t claim to have seen them all. When I was a kid I used to love Starsky and Hutch too. I could never bring myself to watch the remake though as I’m not a fan of remakes in general. I hated the re-make of True Grit and, much as I like Steve Martin, I hated his take on Clouseau. I never bothered watching his Bilko but I just can’t see Bilko as anyone but Phil Silvers.

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2 hours ago, HerlockSholmes said:

I guess that a not very believable basic idea isn’t reason for simply dismissing a show but there was something about it that I never liked. Maybe if I gave it a second chance.

Wouldn't hurt to try.  I'd recommend no more than one episode per week, though!  If after several episodes at weekly intervals you still don't care for it, maybe you simply don't care for it!

2 hours ago, HerlockSholmes said:

Of all of the USA detectives shows I have to say that Columbo is number one for me although I couldn’t claim to have seen them all.

There are a bunch, and most of them are very good.  As with MSW, though, I'd recommend not overdosing, lest the formulaic bits ("Oh yeah, just one more thing!") start to grate on you.

2 hours ago, HerlockSholmes said:

much as I like Steve Martin, I hated his take on Clouseau. I never bothered watching his Bilko but I just can’t see Bilko as anyone but Phil Silvers.

Saw his Clouseau myself.  Bleh.  The bumbling was there, but not the heart.

He remade Bilko?!  ANYbody remade Bilko?!   :o

 

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On 1/31/2022 at 3:12 PM, Carol the Dabbler said:
On 1/31/2022 at 1:33 PM, HerlockSholmes said:

I never liked Murder She Wrote even though it became staggeringly popular.

Over there too, huh?  I assume your reason for not liking it was this:

On 4/4/2018 at 10:04 AM, HerlockSholmes said:

Ive never really been one for Marple though. I could never get past the ‘why would the police allow an old lady into their investigations?’ question. A bit like ‘Murder She Wrote,’ which I hated.

I really enjoyed it while it was on the air, just one episode per week.  But we're watching it on DVD now, one episode per evening, and now that we're up to season ten, it's kinda starting to get to me.  Quite possibly I should not have read that parody in December:

On 12/4/2021 at 10:35 PM, Carol the Dabbler said:

It's called "The Formula for an Episode of Murder She Wrote" [here], and even though I love the show, I must admit that this writer has it hilariously pegged.

Maybe my current unease is simply due to overexposure, but I'm starting to think that the clues are becoming more tenuous.  During the early seasons I would usually spot at least one clue right when it happened.  Now, though, I'm sometimes lucky to see its relevance even when Jessica points it out.

I used to watch it quite often, but it was never a favorite of mine either. And I agree that it just became too formulaic, after a while I couldn't watch it at all. But I know people who still think it's the cat's meow. I have to admit I adore Angela Lansbury, but the storylines just made me yawn. 

Off now to read the parody.... :D 

ETA - parody was hilarious!

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