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JimmyNeutron

Some Interesting Logic Puzzles

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My first post here, so hey everyone. I'm a big fan of Sherlock (which you could probably deduce by my presence here). I just wanted to post a couple of interesting logic puzzles I found. I was looking for some challenging logic puzzles to test my deductive reasoning abilities. They are new to me, but maybe not to some of you.

 

Here's one.

 

Here's the other (slightly harder).

 

If anyone knows any there logic puzzles, let me know! I love these things.

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Hi Jimmy, welcome to the forum!

 

I have no logic, but I actually got the second one, because of the clues provided by the first one. Yay! :)

 

Hope you'll jump in to some of the discussions or other games around here. :welcome:

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I got a different answer for the second one, and can't offhand find a problem with it:

 

 

1. Divide the twelve pills into four piles of three. Weigh two of the piles against each other. If a] one pile is heavier, the safe pill is in that pile, so skip directly to step 3. But if b] the two piles balance, it's in one of the other two piles.

 

2. In case b], weigh the remaining two piles against each other, and the safe pill in in the heavier pile.

 

3. In any case, take two pills from the heavier pile and weigh them against each other. If one is heavier, that's the safe one. If they're the same, it's the third pill.

 

The puzzle said I'm allowed three weighings, but that doesn't say I'm required to use all three. (I will admit that the solution given on YouTube is tidier, since it always requires the same number of weighings.) Also, this solution assumes that all of the poison pills weigh the same, but I believe that the puzzle-giver's solutions also assume this.

 

 

Am I overlooking something?

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Hi JimmyNeutron, welcome to the forum.

 

I also got different answer for the second one:

 

 

- divide into three piles with four pills each,

first weight will determine the pile with the safe pill

- take two pills of the safe pile and weight, if one is heavier, you've found it, if not

- weight the remaining two pills

 

 

 

I actually found a good puzzle a while ago that took me sometime to crack it. However, when I looked at the answer, they did the elimination logic incorrectly, skip one-two steps and the answer can be challenge because it's still ambiguous ( :rofl: bahahhaha sorry, unrelated matter: just now I googled ambiguous to see if I spell it correctly and the google search suggest 'ambiguous genitalia', that is soooo random :D)

 

It's some sort of elimination logic to find the culprit among various suspects with some clue given for each suspect. I was tempted to post in here but there was no suitable thread. If I could find that back, I would put it here.

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I don't have any success yet in finding the puzzle I mentioned above, but found another.

 

I had never seen it before, but seems famous, it's from Einstein. It's said only 2% of population would be able to solve it, but I think that's a load of exaggeration.

 

It's easier than some keen arithmetic puzzle, the clues are pretty clear and didn't find any hiccups.

 

Try it out.

 

2116o9y.jpg

 

Answer:

 

 

German.

By the time you reach the answer, you should have known everyone's particulars.

 

 

Oh.. and.., one important puzzle, where do newbies go? :p

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Announcement from Sherlockology. Maybe I've just eaten one sugar cookie too many, but this actually sounds really cool to me. Sort of a cross between fanfiction and a math textbook....

 

tumblr_oy2l8g5CTs1qkgkowo1_500.jpg

 

PREVIEW: The Sherlock Puzzle Book, out next week from @BBCBooks!

Read an exclusive extract, and pre-order here.

 

View the full article

 

Another excerpt from the above-mentioned puzzle book. I admit to having no clue what the answer is. I notice Sherlock doesn't seem to either, so at least I'm in good company.

 

tumblr_oy4lh0LugR1qkgkowo1_500.jpg

 

#SherlockPuzzleBook Day One!

A perfectly logical question…?

PRE-ORDER your copy, out October 26! http://po.st/SherlockPuzzleBook

 

View the full article

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I don't have any success yet in finding the puzzle I mentioned above, but found another.

 

I had never seen it before, but seems famous, it's from Einstein. It's said only 2% of population would be able to solve it, but I think that's a load of exaggeration.

 

It's easier than some keen arithmetic puzzle, the clues are pretty clear and didn't find any hiccups.

 

Try it out.

 

2116o9y.jpg

 

Answer:

 

 

German.

By the time you reach the answer, you should have known everyone's particulars.

 

 

Oh.. and.., one important puzzle, where do newbies go? :P

 

 

I figured it out! Then felt stupid because I didn't notice you had already listed the answer. But I figured it out! Yay me!

 

I have no idea where newbies go. Into a hive with the mamabies?

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I'm tempted to say the waiter -- just because.

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Or the butler.

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Precisely!

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I’m not good at this kind of thing but I’ll have a go.

 

John says “er do we?” - if he didn’t want coffee then there would be no need for the answer that he gave because ‘logically’ he’d have known that ‘we’ didnt ‘all’ want coffee. So John wanted coffee.

 

Sherlock says ‘I don’t know.’ - ‘logically’ he’d have deduced that John wanted coffee. If he didn’t want coffee himself he would have just said ‘no, we don’t all want coffee.’ If he did want coffee he still wouldn’t have been able to answer the waiters question properly because he hadn’t heard Mycroft’s answer yet. So Sherlock wanted coffee.

 

Mycroft said ‘no.’ - he would have deduced, by the reasoning above, that both John and Sherlock wanted coffee. So by saying ‘no’ ie that they didn’t ‘all’ want coffee, he’s saying that he didn’t want coffee.

 

So my answer, which is probably completely wrong, is that only John and Sherlock wanted coffee.

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I have no idea, Herlock!

 

But there's been another puzzle posted, and I think I got this one (though if I'd been trying to answer as quickly as possible, I would have gotten it wrong).

 

tumblr_oy6aq7XMDb1qkgkowo1_500.jpg

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Is this one a trick question?

 

Is it Friday? Which means Today, Tomorrow, Tuesday and Thursday?

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Darn, I think you're right!  And that would explain why they specified a weekday, rather than a day of the week.  (Note to any non-native speakers who are scratching their heads over the illogical terminology:  in American usage -- and judging by this puzzle, in British usage as well -- a "day of the week" is any of the seven days, whereas a "weekday" is any of the five days of the traditional work week, Monday through Friday, as opposed to the weekend days, Saturday and Sunday.)

 

I was interpreting it more literally.  Much better puzzle your way!

 

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Dang, I was going to guess Sunday, because it's at the start of the week. (Today, tomorrow, Tues & Thurs). But you're right, the "weekday" terminology must mean Friday. (So, Tues, Thurs, today and tomorrow.)

 

On the first one, I got John and Mycroft's wishes, but hadn't worked out Sherlock yet. But I think you've got it, Herlock!

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Dang, I was going to guess Sunday, because it's at the start of the week. (Today, tomorrow, Tues & Thurs). But you're right, the "weekday" terminology must mean Friday. (So, Tues, Thurs, today and tomorrow.)

 

On the first one, I got John and Mycroft's wishes, but hadn't worked out Sherlock yet. But I think you've got it, Herlock!

Thanks Arcadia.

 

I’ve re-read it and can’t see any other possible answer but these kind of questions often have an unseen twist that I may have missed.

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I’ve just seen this Sherlock riddle online:

 

Sherlock breaks into a crime scene. The victim is the owner who is slumped in a chair with a bullet in his head. There’s a gun on the floor and a tape recorder on the table. Sherlock presses the play button and hears the message. ‘ I have committed sins in my life so I offer my soul to the Lord,’ followed by the sound of a gunshot.

Sherlock informs the police that it’s murder.

 

How does he know?

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Because

 

 

If it was suicide, who rewound the tape?

 

 

Did I finally get one right?

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And here's day #3 from the puzzle book:

 

tumblr_oy85e43wX41qkgkowo1_500.jpg

 

That'll take some thought!

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Because

 

 

If it was suicide, who rewound the tape?

 

 

Did I finally get one right?

You have

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And here's day #3 from the puzzle book:

 

tumblr_oy85e43wX41qkgkowo1_500.jpg

 

That'll take some thought!

I might be being a bit dense here Carol but...you can m0ve the digits but not change the order? By moving the digits you are surely changing the order? I’m missing something here. Does that make sense to you Carol?

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Another Sherlock puzzle while I wait for your reply on the puzzling puzzle.

 

It’s a snowy night and Sherlock is sitting by the fire when all of a sudden a snowball comes crashing through the window. He looks outside and sees 3 youths running away. He recognises them as 3 brothers, Paul Crimson, Mark Crimson and David Crimson but he doesn’t know which one threw the snowball. Next day he gets a note which reads: “? Crimson. He broke your window.”

 

Sherlock knows who is guilty. Who is it?

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I might be being a bit dense here Carol but...you can m0ve the digits but not change the order? By moving the digits you are surely changing the order? I’m missing something here. Does that make sense to you Carol?

Yeah, that took me a while, but as I understand it, you can slide the digits further apart or closer together, in order to accommodate the plus signs.  That's all it means, I think.

 

Still pondering the window one.

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On second thought, they say "in any direction" rather than "in either direction" -- so perhaps up and down are also allowed?  Not quite sure how that'd help, though.

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