Jump to content

Shoot the Wall (A.K.A. The Rant Thread)


Banshee
 Share

Recommended Posts

... I ... really hate people who underestimate the things that I can do just because I'm a girl....

 

This probably won't make you feel any better, but it used to be worse. It used to be laws and official policies. Now it's just attitudes, and those are changing. Slowly. Very slowly. But they are changing (mostly as the people who think that way die off, I suppose).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

sometimes I wish I was more like Bella Swan prior to her meeting Edward properly. once she made a decision she stuck with it, i've been agonizing over something for three days now. and my mind is only at rest by falling on my own sword

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oh yes most of the people who do this are older women.

 

Oh, OK, then they're not doubting your competence, they're merely concerned that your employer is not treating you fairly. They're trying to be nice, honest. But the world is changing, and they're having one heck of a time keeping up with it!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

... i've been agonizing over something for three days now....

 

This sometimes helps:

 

Tell yourself that you'll let the decision be made by the toss of a coin -- heads, you will, and tails, you won't, or whatever. Then toss the coin, look at how it fell, and see how you feel about it -- relieved, disappointed -- ?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Never time to do it right. Always time to do it over.

Indeed. Because, if we did it right the first time around, and didn't have to redo it thirty times, it would take less time. But never minds, who would care about things like using time efficiently, particularly when we are severely understaffed

 

I had that mentally framed on my office wall, along with

 

Good

Fast

Cheap

Pick any two.

 

The problem with that one, according to my boss, is that permanent employees are a constant expense, so they tend to take "cheap" out of the equation, so they expect "good" and "fast" to magically happen...

 

And

 

Failure to plan on your part

does not constitute an emergency on my part.

Not that that ever changed anything ....

 

 

I might have to get that one in my office. Might have to add a "and I told you it would all go wrong" to it :)

 

 

And school teachers. For use on vice principals who interrupt your class with complaints like, "Your window shades are not all at the same level."

 

I used to go home after school and bake brownies -- beating the batter vigorously in a big mixing bowl, using a big wooden spoon. Never thought to take the spoon to school with me, though.

 

Then I got into computers. Much easier!

 

 

"Your window shades are not all at the same level"? Seriously? I mean, it might be a fair comment to make after class (I used to have a teacher who insisted in us clearing and organising the class before she started!), but, interrupting a class for that?

 

Yes, seriously. Very seriously. Can you say "Challenger"? Or "O-rings"?

 

Yeah! I am kind of pessimistic at work, so I'm very good at listing everything that could go wrong, often in order or how likely they are to happen. And people still act surprise when things in my list happen... *sigh*

 

Sometimes "I told you so" seems inadequate.

 

I do pre-emptive "I told you so". Not that it gets me anywhere. But...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

.... The problem with that one, according to my boss, is that permanent employees are a constant expense, so they tend to take "cheap" out of the equation, so they expect "good" and "fast" to magically happen...

 

This is one context in which that horrible term "human resources" might actually be helpful. It would never occur to a manager to ignore the cost of their inventory resources, but they apparently believe that "human resources" can be frittered away without consequence. (I do hate that term, though -- I am not a "resource" -- I will not be briefed, debriefed, or numbered!)

 

 

"Your window shades are not all at the same level"? Seriously? I mean, it might be a fair comment to make after class ... but, interrupting a class for that?

 

In all fairness, I don't actually recall whether he interrupted my class for that one. But my real point was that I had been operating under the quaint delusion that the window shades were meant to be functional. My classroom faced south, so that the morning sun would glare on the blackboard, and the afternoon sun would shine directly into the students' eyes. Therefore, I would lower the shades in the problem area and raise them elsewhere to provide indirect light. The only way that I could satisfy the vice principal's edict was to keep all the shades down all the time and turn on the ceiling lights. Conformity was apparently more important than the electric bill. (And, by the way, my windows were visible only from the football practice field and the railroad tracks.)

 

 

... I am kind of pessimistic at work, so I'm very good at listing everything that could go wrong, often in order or how likely they are to happen. And people still act surprise when things in my list happen...

 

I have long maintained that in order to be a good software engineer, one must actually be a bit paranoid. After all, nine-tenths of reliable code consists of error checking and error handling. So you have to be able to think of all the things that could conceivably go wrong during use (hardware malfunctions, faulty data, operator errors, operator stupidity, ....).

 

But I think you were talking about the things that can go wrong during the development of new software -- interruptions, inconsistent specs, incomplete specs, last-minute additions and changes, etc. So of course the only sensible way to estimate how long a project will take is to compute how long it should take, then multiply by pi.

 

I had one boss (mercifully, for only a couple of years) who would absolutely refuse to listen to a realistic estimate. He would insist that it couldn't possibly take that long. So I would tell him how long it "should" take (the Pollyanna estimate), then every time I hit a snag, I would go to him and say, "Gee, there's been a change in the specs," or "I had to help Steve with his project, so it's gonna take another couple of weeks," and he was fine with that. And of course the whole thing would end up taking about as long as my original estimate.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

This is one context in which that horrible term "human resources" might actually be helpful. It would never occur to a manager to ignore the cost of their inventory resources, but they apparently believe that "human resources" can be frittered away without consequence. (I do hate that term, though -- I am not a "resource" -- I will not be briefed, debriefed, or numbered!)

 

Indeed! I dislike the term a lot. I'm not a table! I'm not interchangeable with any other resource of the same category!

 

In all fairness, I don't actually recall whether he interrupted my class for that one. But my real point was that I had been operating under the quaint delusion that the window shades were meant to be functional. My classroom faced south, so that the morning sun would glare on the blackboard, and the afternoon sun would shine directly into the students' eyes. Therefore, I would lower the shades in the problem area and raise them elsewhere to provide indirect light. The only way that I could satisfy the vice principal's edict was to keep all the shades down all the time and turn on the ceiling lights. Conformity was apparently more important than the electric bill. (And, by the way, my windows were visible only from the football practice field and the railroad tracks.)

 

Sounds... yeah. :eyeroll:

 

I have long maintained that in order to be a good software engineer, one must actually be a bit paranoid. After all, nine-tenths of reliable code consists of error checking and error handling. So you have to be able to think of all the things that could conceivably go wrong during use (hardware malfunctions, faulty data, operator errors, operator stupidity, ....).

 

But I think you were talking about the things that can go wrong during the development of new software -- interruptions, inconsistent specs, incomplete specs, last-minute additions and changes, etc. So of course the only sensible way to estimate how long a project will take is to compute how long it should take, then multiply by pi.

 

Yeah. Being paranoid is part of the job. I think the only time I've worked somewhere where we managed realistic estimates, it involved a) a massive list of "things we always forget to plan for" that everybody had to triple-check when providing estimates, B) an additional 10% of "unknown, unexpected stuff that will happen but we don't know about yet" being added to just about every estimate by developers, c) an additional 15% of "unknown, unexpected stuff that will happen but we don't know about yet" being added by the project manager, and d) massive lessons learned exercises at the end of every release cycle. Everywhere else, it's just "finger up in the air without even thinking about it", and then we wonder why we don't hit it...

 

I had one boss (mercifully, for only a couple of years) who would absolutely refuse to listen to a realistic estimate. He would insist that it couldn't possibly take that long. So I would tell him how long it "should" take (the Pollyanna estimate), then every time I hit a snag, I would go to him and say, "Gee, there's been a change in the specs," or "I had to help Steve with his project, so it's gonna take another couple of weeks," and he was fine with that. And of course the whole thing would end up taking about as long as my original estimate.

 

Well, at least he was fine with the "things have gone wrong" moment! :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dear work,

 

1.- Complex projects require a project manager to make sure things are going as expected and can be delivered on time.

2.- Complex projects with a high impact on the business require a project manager even more.

3.- Project managers are supposed to manage the project, not to keep demanding pointless meetings when the project is already late. Not that this happened in this project, since we didn't have one.

4.- Nasa did consider the O-ring in the secondary rockets "safe enough to keep flying". A year later Challenger happened. Just because right now nothing has gone as horribly wrong as I predicted, it does not mean that things won't go wrong later on. And, when it happens, it won't be my fault - I wasn't the one that fast-tracked everything!

 

No love,

Me

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, at least he was fine with the "things have gone wrong" moment!

 

Yeah, it was just the "things will go wrong" concept that he could never wrap his head around.

 

 

Nasa did consider the O-ring in the secondary rockets "safe enough to keep flying". A year later Challenger happened. Just because right now nothing has gone as horribly wrong as I predicted, it does not mean that things won't go wrong later on.

 

As I recall, it was even worse than that. The O-rings were only certified down to a certain ambient temperature, and the night before the scheduled Challenger launch was extremely cold by Florida standards. The engineers (you know, those people that no one ever listens to) were literally screaming that the launch had to be postponed. But the higher-ups replied that postponement would mean missing the current launch window entirely, so that it would be months before another launch could be scheduled, which would be horribly embarrassing, and besides, don't be silly (here it comes), there's never been a problem.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As I recall, it was even worse than that. The O-rings were only certified down to a certain ambient temperature, and the night before the scheduled Challenger launch was extremely cold by Florida standards. The engineers (you know, those people that no one ever listens to) were literally screaming that the launch had to be postponed. But the higher-ups replied that postponement would mean missing the current launch window entirely, so that it would be months before another launch could be scheduled, which would be horribly embarrassing, and besides, don't be silly (here it comes), there's never been a problem.

 

Yeah, that's exactly what I've heard as well. I was referring mostly to the fact that when the company that made the rockets examined the ones recovered from a launch almost a year before Challenger, someone had a massive "Oh damn, we were really lucky this time" and suggested that something had to be done. Yet everybody higher up decided that yeah, it'd be safe enough for now. Never mind, it'll be okay. What do you mean Challenger exploded? No, no, we were told it was safe. I can only imagine the "Excuse me? We bloody told you this would happen!!!!!" faces some of the engineers must have had that day...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

... when the company that made the rockets examined the ones recovered from a launch almost a year before Challenger, someone had a massive "Oh damn, we were really lucky this time" and suggested that something had to be done. Yet everybody higher up decided that yeah, it'd be safe enough for now. .... I can only imagine the "Excuse me? We bloody told you this would happen!!!!!" faces some of the engineers must have had that day...

 

Hadn't heard that bit -- it only gets worse, huh?

 

I am so glad that my software never actually had the responsibility for protecting anyone's life. (At the very worst, a "safety" failure might have caused some temporary discomfort.)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am so glad that my software never actually had the responsibility for protecting anyone's life. (At the very worst, a "safety" failure might have caused some temporary discomfort.)

 

Yeah. I got to a point the other day where the best thing I could say about the company was "thank goodness we don't do flight control software or something like that"...

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

Bashing.

My first rant, which has nothing to do with this quote. The crushing tedium of boring people with their boring everyday grievances. My second, I hate bashing. In fact, there's a Sherlock board on the BBC messageboards where several people just bash Sherlock and I'm like "If you don't like Sherlock, then why are you on this messageboard?" I know people are entitled to their own opinions, but as Thumper once said "If you don't have somethin nice to say, don't say nothin at all." :sherlock2:
Link to comment
Share on other sites

... there's a Sherlock board ... where several people just bash Sherlock and ... as Thumper once said "If you don't have somethin nice to say, don't say nothin at all."

 

I'm with you, Thumper -- er, CSI. For one thing, a forum isn't a private party, it's on the Internet, for Pete's sake. Anyone who's online, anywhere in the world, can read what's written on these forums -- including the Sherlock actors, the production staff, and the fans. Would people be so quick to bash, say, Moffat if they were sitting at a dinner table where he was also a guest? Actors, staff members, and fans are people, and people have feelings.

 

I'm not saying that nobody should criticize anyone or anything, I'm just saying it would be best to say what you really mean. Suppose, for example, that you don't like a particular actor's acting style -- well then, just say that. Please don't phrase your opinion as though it were a fact, and say, "So-and-so is a lousy actor." For one thing, people who like his style may be offended, and for another, would you really want So-and-so himself to read your post?

Edited by Carol the Dabbler
Link to comment
Share on other sites

This has nothing to do with fandom or anything in general, just a rant. I hate it when your nose gets stuffed up in the middle of summer! It's warm, not cold! Why is my nose stuffed up??? And I also hate it when you get sick and you have no idea how it happened. You just feel horrible all of a sudden. Especially when you hardly ever actually get sick.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 5 months later...

Blooming crackpot conspiracy theory nutters claiming that the Sandy Hook shooting was staged (ie: no one was really killed and it was all a hoax) in order to "Push through" gun control laws...

 

(I'm referring to a spam email doing the rounds, the contents of which are just too deeply stupid to quote!) :picard::toss:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Blooming crackpot conspiracy theory nutters claiming that the Sandy Hook shooting was staged (ie: no one was really killed and it was all a hoax) in order to "Push through" gun control laws...

 

(I'm referring to a spam email doing the rounds, the contents of which are just too deeply stupid to quote!) :picard::toss:

 

Ooh, that one would make me rather mad as well. Found a rant on Facebook that I must agree with. People who pretend to be other people on sites like Facebook and Twitter. Not here or other forums or various places like such, it's okay to do that. But if you're looking for REAL people on Twitter/Facebook, you have to constantly sort through all these pretenders. I mean, yes, it's a free internet space, but come on. Really. You might like that person, but you don't have to pretend to be them to prove it. It makes me quite angry.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

IIIIIIIIIIIIIII have no idea what I'm doing with my bridal party. Nothing makes sense. I'm over-thinking it and I know that I am, I know that I need to approach it with a clear head, but I can't seem to give myself permission to go for one measly day without thinking about it at all.

 

What are valid reasons to "demote" people from being in a wedding party? Is "I asked you too soon, and since then I've gone and stood in the church, stood at the alter and feel that I only can envision having my siblings and MAYBE my cousin up there" a valid reason? Is "The only people that make sense with crystal-perfect clarity and 0% doubt in my mind are my siblings, the other two bring about a tiny bit of apprehension at the thought of having them up there" a valid reason?

 

Bah. Brain, can you turn off my emotions for a bit so I can get this sorted, please?

 

Hmmmmm. This is a killer problem. Don't think of it as demoting. Give these ladies a designated duty to perform. One of them can be the Lady of Flowers; in charge of making sure all the floral arrangements at the church and reception site are properly set up and looked after. Another lady could be in charge of gift recieving; making sure all the tags are firmly attached to the boxes so you know exactly who gave you what. Someone else would be responsible for the elderly guests; making sure their needs are seen too. Also there is the catering problem; someone has to shuttle back and forth bringing messages from the kitchen to the bridal party, about when things are ready to proceed. And there is also the problem of out of town guests; someone needs to help them find accommodation, and get them to rehearsal dinners and the church and reception.

 

This is YOUR wedding. Deep cleansing breath! If you have decided that you want a smaller bridal party that is your right. But you can eliminate any bad feeling by giving these ladies an important wedding task to be responsible for. Does this work for you?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

For example, there's apparently someone on Twitter who claims to be Martin Freeman.

 

:axe:

 

And at one time the number of fake Steven Moffats was getting rather silly. I wonder if this is why the real Steven eventually and all too briefly joined Twitter.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My rant for today: Cotton-wool kiddies.

 

In the news this afternoon on the radio, kindergarten teachers are making kids bring their own personal and private cuppycakes to school.

 

This is because it is extremely dangerous to bring a birthday cake to school to share with your friends.

 

This is because when you blow out the candles on the cake, the poisonous miasma of spores and goolies will kill everyone in the room when they eat a slice of the infected anthrax cake.

 

GIVE ME A BREAK. Why on earth do we live in such a stupid age? It's a CAKE for the love of god.

 

What do you think happens when you blow out candles on a birthday cake? You breathe.

 

What happens when you talk to someone face-to-face? You breathe.

 

What happens when you accidentally sneeze at someone? You BREATHE.

 

BREATHING in someone's face is NOT GOING TO KILL THEM.

 

Stupid people...

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Breathing is deadly, didn't you know?

 

Wrapping kids in cotton wool doesn't do anything for their ability to cope as teens and adults both academically and otherwise. It seems that even in libraries, people expect to spoon fed now instead of finding/doing stuff for themselves (I'm not a librarian, but one of my sisters is as are a couple of friends).

 

In medical terms, younger people have always been ignorant of cause and effect - the 'head in the sand' approach as everyone assumes nothing bad will happen to them. This is especially worrying when the same person comes in after having a second cocaine related heart attack before the age of 25 because they "thought they'd be OK now as it was a year ago" since the last one!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

  • Who's Online   0 Members, 0 Anonymous, 12 Guests (See full list)

    There are no registered users currently online

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of UseWe have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.Privacy PolicyGuidelines.