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  1. Stumbled over this and found it interesting: (source and links to studies and such is here: https://www.quietrev.com/6-illustrations-that-show-what-its-like-in-an-introverts-head/ )
    6 points
  2. This video has the IMDB ratings of every GOT episode mapped to a piano keyboard, which gives you a handy overview (well, over-sound) of how the show went in just 16 seconds:
    4 points
  3. Hey, how'd you get a picture of my cat? Here's some more of her....
    4 points
  4. What am I doing posting cats? I am not a cat person! Here..., GAH! (J.P after swimming)
    4 points
  5. You're not whining, VBS. Have a distance hug, I'm sorry I can't drop by and give you a real one. To answer your question (as someone who's in her sixth decade now), I've made peace with the fact that I'm an introvert at some point, can't really remember when but it's been a while. Doing so is not easy, because life (and very much the media) tries to sell you that the extrovert way is the only one and that you should have tons of social connections and activities. But that [censored] is exhausting and not fun for me and most of the time, I'd much rather curl up with my dog and a book or spend an evening on the computer, occasionally grousing about the game I'm playing to my (thankfully likewise introverted) husband, who typically is so drawn into his own game he merely mumbles some words of comfort. I do have two close friends, who have been in my life for decades now and who understand that me dropping off the radar for weeks doesn't mean I don't love them any less, and I love hanging out with them every now and then (unfortunately, both are guys and while I'd love a female friend to have tea with, all those connections petered out at some point). But otherwise, it's entirely possible for a week or two to pass during which I'm not interacting with anyone face to face save my husband and what shopping and such I haven't managed to do online, and I'm fine with that. Last year, I finally landed a job I can do remotely, so I phone and vchat a lot but I don't have to go out and be social at the water cooler or whatever, and that's honestly a relief. Admittedly, it helps that I live in a rather close-knit neighborhood, by suburban standards. If I feel like chit-chatting (even I do that, once in a blue moon), all I need to do is grab Lilly and step outside. Still, I'm a loner by any measure, and my funeral likely will be a tiny affair, but so what? I've stopped being interested in popularity contests long ago and while I wish extroverts the best, I'm happy if they just leave me be and have their after work get-togethers and group shopping trips and dinner parties and all those other too-many-people-with-too-little-to-say affairs without me; it'll be more fun for everyone involved that way, trust me. Okay, I'm rambling here. tl;dr: it's your life. Live it the way that makes sense to you and not the way you feel you should. It gets less stressful once you do.
    4 points
  6. A friend sent me this. I've only heard of about half these movies! What kind of fan am I? https://www.lamag.com/culturefiles/being-benedict-cumberbatch/
    4 points
  7. Nor do some of them seem to realize that other people may also have problems, which is the part that eventually gets to me. I don't mind lending a sympathetic ear to someone who's willing to return the favor once in a while.
    4 points
  8. A GIGANTIC HOUND, Mr. Holmes! O_O
    4 points
  9. Thank you! If only everywhere is as cosy as here, too bad we don't have real cake.
    4 points
  10. A fellow Sherlock enthusiast friend informed me of this sad news last night via a text message and it has cast a pall since. Una was a few months younger than my mother, both born in 1937. Based on the last photos of her taken in December 2019, she did not look well, a marked contrast from the vibrant lady pictured just a few years prior. Perusing the photos of her earlier career amongst the many tributes that have been pouring in, I see that smile was always the same, and she was a real dish! Una's characterization of Mrs. Hudson will go down in the annuals of Sherlockiana as one of the very best. She gave the landlady of Baker Street real humanity, wit, acerbity and moxie. As Stephan Moffat so eloquently put it: the brightest light in Baker Street has gone out. May it shine out brightly forever in an even better place.
    4 points
  11. The first seven posts on this forum date from February 25, 2012 -- so technically speaking we missed celebrating the forum's actual tenth anniversary by a few weeks. But what the heck, Happy Birthday, Sherlock Forum! You can see the earliest posts by scrolling down to the bottom of the first page of posts by Tim, AKA Undead Medic (here) and Banshee (here), the forum's creators, admins, and first two members. Here's to the next ten years!
    3 points
  12. Stumbling into this thread this morning is the first I've heard of the passing of Beryl Vertue. Beryl is a crystal that is found worldwide, but it seems to be a very popular girls' name in England. I had never really heard it before Beryl Markham (West with the Night) and then, Stephen's mother-in-law. And then I got into Sherlock Holmes stories and read "The Adventure of the Beryl Coronet", one of the lesser-known tales which was a Conan Doyle favorite if not highly ranked among the public. From a stone website . . I'm not into chakras and stuff but this was quite appropriate for Ms. Vertue, in consideration of the prominence she achieved in a male-dominated industry and singlehandedly remade a lot of it. Beryl is the stone of overcoming obstacles. It holds light and uplifting energies that will help you ease the stress and anxiety that you’re feeling. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Adventure_of_the_Beryl_Coronet
    3 points
  13. I'm with Dilbert there: I have three basic settings I for laundry, shirts/pants/etc., underwear/towels/etc., and kitchen towels/other stuff that needs extra heat (mind you, my washing machine has plenty more, but I generally don't bother). Every item that doesn't survive the category it falls under wasn't meant to be a part of our household anyway.
    3 points
  14. To some extent, that's simply human nature, isn't it? Er... no? Not in the world I occupy, at least. But ... one thing the Trump era taught me ... I live in a different world than a lot of people. I always knew the gulf was there, but I never knew it was so great. I genuinely fear he has "legitimized" attitudes that will eventually destroy this country.
    3 points
  15. I think sh*t has escalated quickly. Someone is throwing a tantrum because he is not allowed to break a toy. I sincerely hope nuclear wouldn't happen, it shouldn't happen, my feeling is no. But then again I never thought Trump would be elected, and people would be so dumb during pandemic. I don't trust myself anymore, I have underestimated human's stupidity, violence tendency and self-destruct. Do what you need to do to stay safe all, especially those who are near. If I remember correctly, J.P is in Poland and Caya Austria, and Fantasy is not far as well? Sorry if I get it wrong. Be safe!
    3 points
  16. That's a very serious accusation, Carol, and sorry but I'd take it a lot more serious if there were, like, any evidence at all, but so far nobody seemed able to produce any. And no, just like with the alleged Antifa involvement in the Capitol attack, absence of evidence is definitely not evidence of absence.
    3 points
  17. Tomorrow is going to be January 6th, which is a reminder of a certain occasion that left a blackmark on the date, but there's enough horrible things happening in the world as it is, so instead I'm going to concentrate reminding myself that Jan 6 is supposed to be Sherlock Holmes' birthday.
    3 points
  18. Happy two days after Christmas, all! I meant to post a funny Christmas animal, but didn't get around to it, so instead here's a post-Christmas animal funny.
    3 points
  19. Hello my fine fellow forum-dwellers. Just stopping by to wish you all a very Merry Christmas, and Happy New Year.
    3 points
  20. Jonathan Creek (BBCTV - 1997 - 2004, with intermittent specials until 2016) takes its name from its eponymous detective, a socially-awkward but brilliant young man (Alan Davies) with exuberant curly hair who lives in a windmill and earns his living by working as an 'engineer of illusions' for a professional stage magician, Adam Klaus, who's as stupid as he is narcissistic. Klaus is the showman and Jonathan is the guy who actually invents the tricks that are performed on stage. Jonathan has a distinctive personal style and lives very intensely for his work, just like another Detective we know. Like that other Detective, he also has a close association with someone who is very good with words on paper, investigative journalist Maddy Magellan (Carolyn Quentin). Maddy is the polar opposite of Jonathan in every way: apart from being female, she's brash, loud, pushy and being very fond of food in general and junk food in particular, quite zaftig. JC, in true Sherlock form is rarely, if ever, seen actually consuming food. He is more laconic than Sherlock Holmes, but just as observant, with a brain wired up to dismantle the mysteries of science, for entertainment purposes and also in how they relate to the commission of crime. Jonathan is the most reluctant of consulting detectives, being the shy and retiring sort that is happiest working in solitude on his illusions, but Maddy on the track of a potential story is a force of nature that drags Jonathan along in her wake, oftentimes in a literal sense. The centerpiece of the show, and the star detective's personal specialty is solving seemingly bizarre crimes (many of them deaths) which have, to all appearances, taken place under impossible conditions--a twist on the classic 'locked room murder'. Jonathan is a modern update on Sherlock Holmes's maxim that 'Once you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, is the truth.' Who better to unravel 'impossible' mysteries than a man whose day job it is to concoct impossibilities for gullible audiences? Using his professional skills, Jonathan unpicks the threads of various crime scenes by working backwards from the result, a similar deductive process he uses when constructing his stage tricks. The writing and situations are often clever but the real strength of the show is its appealing leading man and his dynamic with his 'Watson'. Additional opportunities for comedy arise from Maddy's actively desiring Jonathan as more than just a collaborator in crime-solving. For his part, though his association with Maddy has certainly made his insular existence more varied and interesting, Jonathan finds her overwhelming in too intensive doses and he is certainly Not Interested in anything like That. Despite an increasingly frustrated Maddy's most transparent efforts to make plain her availability for Whatever, Jonathan is not tuned to that frequency. A bit like Someone Else we could mention. Carolyn Quentin departed the show after three seasons to helm her own detective series, Blue Murder (another recommend from me), and Maddy's spot was filled by Julia Sawalha, playing another character. At this point the charm of the show wore off for me and I did not continue, though some of the Christmas specials were good. But if you are looking for a late-1990s update on the Golden Age of Crime locked-room mystery, a cosy procedural with a modern sensibility and a charming comedy-romance with some darker undertones, Jonathan Creek fits the bill.
    3 points
  21. Arcadia: to you. Ideas on how to end phone convos: - at the start of the conversation, point out that you have a time limit à la "I need to do / be at X by Y o'clock". Make something up if you need to. When that time comes round, point it out and hang up with a quick "got to go" or similar. - If your phone has a "knock" option, call it from another phone or line and say "oh, sorry, I have to take that" - If you have kids or pets, they might take care of the issue for you - If you're on a cell phone, purposely go somewhere with really bad reception - Seriously though, nobody is entitled to hours of your time. I think it should be socially acceptable to just tell people you would like to end the conversation. If they can't respect your boundaries then the value of the acquaintance is doubtful.
    3 points
  22. (yes, it's real: https://petallianceorlando.org/pawgwarts/ )
    3 points
  23. Ahhhhh, that's more like it. (The pictures.) It's nice to be home....
    3 points
  24. Those are some fascinating hypotheses! 1. Introverts have a longer neural pathway for processing stimuli (including long-term memory and planning). That could explain why my reactions tend to be kind of complicated, sometimes annoyingly so to some other people. 2. Introverts require less stimulation to stay awake and alert; introverts are more readily over-stimulated. Which may explain why I find the current crop of loud, fast-paced movies really annoying. 3, Introverts need less dopamine to feel happy; they can feel content and energized while reading, thinking deeply, or diving into ideas. You mean other people don't? 4, Introverts feel less excitement from surprise or risk. Which may explain why I don't understand why some people get such a kick out of gambling. (Love that cartoon -- and yeah, cats must be introverts.) 5. Introverts process all things ... not just people. In other words, I'm easily distracted? (Unless I'm really focussed on something, that it.) 6. Introverts reach long-term memory to locate information. Their information processing is slower, as they compare old and new experiences when deciding things. This also means they are careful in making decisions. Not sure this applies to ALL introverts. I'm like that, but my husband often makes snap judgments -- presumably because he's a J (and I'm a P).
    3 points
  25. The major-est ones are the most likely to bug me, I guess. I think Harry being John's sister is clever (and allows for a really funny reaction from Sherlock). I'm (grudgingly!) willing to accept their interpretation of Irene as a dominatrix (though that episode -- and especially That Scene -- make it difficult to recommend the show to a few of my more strait-laced acquaintances). But Mary as a former hired gun is completely contrary to everything we know about the original Mrs. Watson. It's like they offered me a glass of herbal tea on a hot day, so I took a big swig -- only to discover it was actually straight Scotch. At which point they would of course laugh hilariously and say ha-ha we fooled you. No, they didn't fool me, they lied to me. I am not amused. If they want to do that sort of story, fine, just don't advertise it as Sherlock Holmes. Admittedly they're not the only ones doing this sort of thing nowadays. I found Elementary very enjoyable at first, but when they started throwing similar curved balls (and apparently thinking that Big Reveals were equivalent to actual plots), I stopped watching.
    3 points
  26. If you are running an older device, it may be that you aren’t able to update to the latest version of Firefox. (92.0.1 is the current version). It may be worth trying chrome, as Google don’t limit updates on older systems quite so aggressively as Mozilla.
    3 points
  27. I am not sure why girls always look pretty when they are sleeping in the movies while I look like this.
    3 points
  28. Hey, I am trying to be empathetic with your quest, at the same time, I need to fuel my judgmental trait.
    3 points
  29. Hey guys, don't forget Billy the skull, the long suffering fire place decor, he certainly dodged a bullet before being peed.
    3 points
  30. Hey, don't worry about that 😁 I am very validated now, even some of my busybody relatives told me I made the right decisions. Also, people and kids around me in public places validate me every day. 😁 My rant, I like cakes. I don't have sweet tooth, I don't eat a lot of cakes, but sometimes I crave it. And it's not easy to find good cakes that is not ridiculously priced around here. So, I decide to make my own lately. Been quite happy with the results, anyway, I always explore baking when I have time to do so, and feedback have always been positive (free will no threat I swear), but it's quite annoying strolling through forever to find the recipe after the author decides to tell you their whole life story before the recipe, or worse, it is hidden after another click/the need to navigate among those. Anyone feel the same? Do you actually read the blablabla? I know, I know, appreciate the creator. Nope, I just want my cake.
    3 points
  31. You never know... I feel guilty sometimes for bringing a child into this world with all its dangers and the dismal prognosis of climate change etc but on the other hand, has it ever been a "good" time to reproduce...? I took a fatalistic approach to it all in the end. Chances were slim enough that even though I'm not religious at all, I told myself well, if it works out I guess it's meant to be. I'm not so worried about how it'll all be for myself long term ("companionship" vs "meal ticket"), more about this little human whom I chose to be responsible for having a decent life and not cursing me for causing his existence. For myself, I have zero regrets already, the past four years have already been worth everything I can imagine. Still, traffic jams and covid rules, sniffles and babysitting can sometimes put a big strain on my nerves...
    3 points
  32. This is exactly what my interpretation is. Sherlock noticed that John sees Mary (or senses her, or just leads an inner dialogue with a part of his psyche that escapes his control) and acknownledges this. Or just shows off to impress John. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
    3 points
  33. Hey Kat, interesting question indeed. My intpretation of Mary's appearance in The Lying Detective is that she isn't a ghost at all, rather a figment of John's imagination. He's so upset by her death that a part of him simply refuses to acknowledge she's gone and projects a mental image of her back into his life. Not a hallucination exactly but the fantasy seems to be extremely intense and bordering on pathological. When Sherlock "sees" and talks to her too, I take that to mean he has deduced what's going on with John and simply accepted it in a spirit of "it's ok to not be ok". What does everyone else think?
    3 points
  34. https://metro.co.uk/2021/08/14/una-stubbs-death-martin-freeman-pays-tribute-to-sherlock-co-star-15091567/
    3 points
  35. Not at all too late, we're happy to discuss every little detail with you. Welcome to the forum! (hey, if we had tired of it we wouldn't be hanging around here anymore now would we )
    3 points
  36. I love the picture of Una taking tea and dishing about the Troublesome Tenant with the other Mrs. Hudsons . . including the 'real' one, I presume. The Troublesome Tenant is not with them because he is still tending bees near Eastbourne and doing unspecified tasks on Her Majesty's secret service.
    3 points
  37. Thank you for including that link, Bedelia. It's good to know that her family was with her when she passed. I haven't seen any cause of death mentioned yet, but this BBC article does quote her agent as saying that she had been ill for a few months. That's rough news, Besley, but do bear in mind that cancer isn't necessarily a death sentence. I've lost numerous friends and relatives to it, yes, but I also know a number of people who have survived assorted cancers and are in good health years later with no sign of recurrence. As a survivor myself, one of the worst parts was "the look" that people gave me -- like being at my own funeral. I know it's tough, but please try not to treat your friends as "goners." A mix of sympathy and quiet confidence is ideal.
    3 points
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