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  1. This video has the IMDB ratings of every GOT episode mapped to a piano keyboard, which gives you a handy overview (well, over-sound) of how the show went in just 16 seconds:
    5 points
  2. Game Of Tones.
    4 points
  3. Hey, how'd you get a picture of my cat? Here's some more of her....
    4 points
  4. What am I doing posting cats? I am not a cat person! Here..., GAH! (J.P after swimming)
    4 points
  5. You're not whining, VBS. Have a distance hug, I'm sorry I can't drop by and give you a real one. To answer your question (as someone who's in her sixth decade now), I've made peace with the fact that I'm an introvert at some point, can't really remember when but it's been a while. Doing so is not easy, because life (and very much the media) tries to sell you that the extrovert way is the only one and that you should have tons of social connections and activities. But that [censored] is exhausting and not fun for me and most of the time, I'd much rather curl up with my dog and a book or spend an evening on the computer, occasionally grousing about the game I'm playing to my (thankfully likewise introverted) husband, who typically is so drawn into his own game he merely mumbles some words of comfort. I do have two close friends, who have been in my life for decades now and who understand that me dropping off the radar for weeks doesn't mean I don't love them any less, and I love hanging out with them every now and then (unfortunately, both are guys and while I'd love a female friend to have tea with, all those connections petered out at some point). But otherwise, it's entirely possible for a week or two to pass during which I'm not interacting with anyone face to face save my husband and what shopping and such I haven't managed to do online, and I'm fine with that. Last year, I finally landed a job I can do remotely, so I phone and vchat a lot but I don't have to go out and be social at the water cooler or whatever, and that's honestly a relief. Admittedly, it helps that I live in a rather close-knit neighborhood, by suburban standards. If I feel like chit-chatting (even I do that, once in a blue moon), all I need to do is grab Lilly and step outside. Still, I'm a loner by any measure, and my funeral likely will be a tiny affair, but so what? I've stopped being interested in popularity contests long ago and while I wish extroverts the best, I'm happy if they just leave me be and have their after work get-togethers and group shopping trips and dinner parties and all those other too-many-people-with-too-little-to-say affairs without me; it'll be more fun for everyone involved that way, trust me. Okay, I'm rambling here. tl;dr: it's your life. Live it the way that makes sense to you and not the way you feel you should. It gets less stressful once you do.
    4 points
  6. A friend sent me this. I've only heard of about half these movies! What kind of fan am I? https://www.lamag.com/culturefiles/being-benedict-cumberbatch/
    4 points
  7. Sounds adorable (and a bit demanding).
    3 points
  8. Which reminds me of a joke I heard recently. Two dogs and a cat go to heaven. God interviews them. He asks the first dog, "What do you believe in?" The dog answers, "I believe in loyalty and devotion to my master." "Very good," says God, "you shall sit at my right hand." Then he asks the second dog, "What do you believe?" The dog answers "I believe in love, companionship and faithfulness." "Very good," says God, "you shall sit at my left." Then He turns to the cat. "And what do you believe?" And the cat says, "I believe you're sitting in my seat."
    3 points
  9. Good point! American productions used to have a lot of real people in them -- not often in starring roles, but frequently in highly visible supporting roles. Admittedly, if I'd been casting the elves I'd have picked terminally attractive people. And admittedly they did cast "character actors" as (some of) the dwarves and hobbits. But the actors playing the (non-evil) humans were uniformly pretty, weren't they? And those were the characters I had the most trouble telling apart. In the casting people's defense, though, Tolkien seemed to view physical attractiveness as an inherent quality of good people, especially if they were descended from royalty.
    3 points
  10. Why am I worried that you will reveal bits by bits lower and we will eventually see what we are not supposed to see??? Is this her as well?
    3 points
  11. The first seven posts on this forum date from February 25, 2012 -- so technically speaking we missed celebrating the forum's actual tenth anniversary by a few weeks. But what the heck, Happy Birthday, Sherlock Forum! You can see the earliest posts by scrolling down to the bottom of the first page of posts by Tim, AKA Undead Medic (here) and Banshee (here), the forum's creators, admins, and first two members. Here's to the next ten years!
    3 points
  12. I heard this one ages ago from my friend Ed. So blame him, OK? Two frogs were resting on a lily pad, lazily flicking their tongues out to catch insects. And one of them said to the other, "Did you ever notice how time's fun when you're having flies?"
    3 points
  13. Stumbling into this thread this morning is the first I've heard of the passing of Beryl Vertue. Beryl is a crystal that is found worldwide, but it seems to be a very popular girls' name in England. I had never really heard it before Beryl Markham (West with the Night) and then, Stephen's mother-in-law. And then I got into Sherlock Holmes stories and read "The Adventure of the Beryl Coronet", one of the lesser-known tales which was a Conan Doyle favorite if not highly ranked among the public. From a stone website . . I'm not into chakras and stuff but this was quite appropriate for Ms. Vertue, in consideration of the prominence she achieved in a male-dominated industry and singlehandedly remade a lot of it. Beryl is the stone of overcoming obstacles. It holds light and uplifting energies that will help you ease the stress and anxiety that you’re feeling. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Adventure_of_the_Beryl_Coronet
    3 points
  14. I'm with Dilbert there: I have three basic settings I for laundry, shirts/pants/etc., underwear/towels/etc., and kitchen towels/other stuff that needs extra heat (mind you, my washing machine has plenty more, but I generally don't bother). Every item that doesn't survive the category it falls under wasn't meant to be a part of our household anyway.
    3 points
  15. To some extent, that's simply human nature, isn't it? Er... no? Not in the world I occupy, at least. But ... one thing the Trump era taught me ... I live in a different world than a lot of people. I always knew the gulf was there, but I never knew it was so great. I genuinely fear he has "legitimized" attitudes that will eventually destroy this country.
    3 points
  16. I think sh*t has escalated quickly. Someone is throwing a tantrum because he is not allowed to break a toy. I sincerely hope nuclear wouldn't happen, it shouldn't happen, my feeling is no. But then again I never thought Trump would be elected, and people would be so dumb during pandemic. I don't trust myself anymore, I have underestimated human's stupidity, violence tendency and self-destruct. Do what you need to do to stay safe all, especially those who are near. If I remember correctly, J.P is in Poland and Caya Austria, and Fantasy is not far as well? Sorry if I get it wrong. Be safe!
    3 points
  17. That's a very serious accusation, Carol, and sorry but I'd take it a lot more serious if there were, like, any evidence at all, but so far nobody seemed able to produce any. And no, just like with the alleged Antifa involvement in the Capitol attack, absence of evidence is definitely not evidence of absence.
    3 points
  18. Tomorrow is going to be January 6th, which is a reminder of a certain occasion that left a blackmark on the date, but there's enough horrible things happening in the world as it is, so instead I'm going to concentrate reminding myself that Jan 6 is supposed to be Sherlock Holmes' birthday.
    3 points
  19. Happy two days after Christmas, all! I meant to post a funny Christmas animal, but didn't get around to it, so instead here's a post-Christmas animal funny.
    3 points
  20. Hello my fine fellow forum-dwellers. Just stopping by to wish you all a very Merry Christmas, and Happy New Year.
    3 points
  21. Jonathan Creek (BBCTV - 1997 - 2004, with intermittent specials until 2016) takes its name from its eponymous detective, a socially-awkward but brilliant young man (Alan Davies) with exuberant curly hair who lives in a windmill and earns his living by working as an 'engineer of illusions' for a professional stage magician, Adam Klaus, who's as stupid as he is narcissistic. Klaus is the showman and Jonathan is the guy who actually invents the tricks that are performed on stage. Jonathan has a distinctive personal style and lives very intensely for his work, just like another Detective we know. Like that other Detective, he also has a close association with someone who is very good with words on paper, investigative journalist Maddy Magellan (Carolyn Quentin). Maddy is the polar opposite of Jonathan in every way: apart from being female, she's brash, loud, pushy and being very fond of food in general and junk food in particular, quite zaftig. JC, in true Sherlock form is rarely, if ever, seen actually consuming food. He is more laconic than Sherlock Holmes, but just as observant, with a brain wired up to dismantle the mysteries of science, for entertainment purposes and also in how they relate to the commission of crime. Jonathan is the most reluctant of consulting detectives, being the shy and retiring sort that is happiest working in solitude on his illusions, but Maddy on the track of a potential story is a force of nature that drags Jonathan along in her wake, oftentimes in a literal sense. The centerpiece of the show, and the star detective's personal specialty is solving seemingly bizarre crimes (many of them deaths) which have, to all appearances, taken place under impossible conditions--a twist on the classic 'locked room murder'. Jonathan is a modern update on Sherlock Holmes's maxim that 'Once you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, is the truth.' Who better to unravel 'impossible' mysteries than a man whose day job it is to concoct impossibilities for gullible audiences? Using his professional skills, Jonathan unpicks the threads of various crime scenes by working backwards from the result, a similar deductive process he uses when constructing his stage tricks. The writing and situations are often clever but the real strength of the show is its appealing leading man and his dynamic with his 'Watson'. Additional opportunities for comedy arise from Maddy's actively desiring Jonathan as more than just a collaborator in crime-solving. For his part, though his association with Maddy has certainly made his insular existence more varied and interesting, Jonathan finds her overwhelming in too intensive doses and he is certainly Not Interested in anything like That. Despite an increasingly frustrated Maddy's most transparent efforts to make plain her availability for Whatever, Jonathan is not tuned to that frequency. A bit like Someone Else we could mention. Carolyn Quentin departed the show after three seasons to helm her own detective series, Blue Murder (another recommend from me), and Maddy's spot was filled by Julia Sawalha, playing another character. At this point the charm of the show wore off for me and I did not continue, though some of the Christmas specials were good. But if you are looking for a late-1990s update on the Golden Age of Crime locked-room mystery, a cosy procedural with a modern sensibility and a charming comedy-romance with some darker undertones, Jonathan Creek fits the bill.
    3 points
  22. Stumbled over this and found it interesting: (source and links to studies and such is here: https://www.quietrev.com/6-illustrations-that-show-what-its-like-in-an-introverts-head/ )
    3 points
  23. Oh heck I agree...I think there is much more story fodder from Mrs H's death and the boys' life afterwards...
    2 points
  24. Looking on the bright side, there was a ... literally the least they could do after
    2 points
  25. (no, that's not CGI, that's a nudibranch aka sea slug)
    2 points
  26. Strictly Xmas, in the same way Jingle Bells is I guess. And both firs and spruces are traditional Christmas trees, it's just that firs are more sought after because they're less prickly and therefore easier to decorate.
    2 points
  27. Merry Christmas to all you lovely people!
    2 points
  28. Mrs Hudson owns the building, I expect she would leave it to Sherlock and John.
    2 points
  29. That is one of the most beautiful things I have ever read.
    2 points
  30. I just came across a much longer remembrance by Martin Freeman, here.
    2 points
  31. Got it, and I agree with the bigger-faster-louder complaint; if a story doesn't work, explosions aren't going to fix it.
    2 points
  32. I think to be fair: the film is set in brutal times and people lived very flimsy lives... think of it as a historical piece, if it helps you cope.
    2 points
  33. Yup, I can imagine him sitting there in the stands (assuming that he somehow got that far), saying "But what's the point?"
    2 points
  34. Oh, and I also tried to watch the highly-recommended-by-friends "Yellowstone". The first episode was so filled with profanity (boring!!!!) that I soon started playing a video game while it was on, and then they inserted a pointless and very raunchy sex scene, at which point I turned it off. Why, why, why do they feel such crap is necessary to tell a story???? Wah..........
    2 points
  35. I've heard of it but never seen it, but it's been on PBS, I remember seeing the listings. Now I kind wish I'd watched it.
    2 points
  36. We've recently been watching an episode of Murder, She Wrote (on DVD) each evening with supper, and anyone who's also watched the show frequently (e.g., in daily syndication) might appreciate a piece that I happened upon. It's called "The Formula for an Episode of Murder She Wrote" [here], and even though I love the show, I must admit that this writer has it hilariously pegged. Brief sample: JESSICA’S LOVELY FRIEND: Well, this isn’t at all the right context for this phrase, but a rolling stone gathers no moss. JESSICA: Moss… that’s it! JESSICA’S LOVELY FRIEND: That’s what? JESSICA: The missing piece of the puzzle! P.S.: Some of the comments are pretty good too.
    2 points
  37. This is exactly what my interpretation is. Sherlock noticed that John sees Mary (or senses her, or just leads an inner dialogue with a part of his psyche that escapes his control) and acknownledges this. Or just shows off to impress John. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
    2 points
  38. Hey Kat, interesting question indeed. My intpretation of Mary's appearance in The Lying Detective is that she isn't a ghost at all, rather a figment of John's imagination. He's so upset by her death that a part of him simply refuses to acknowledge she's gone and projects a mental image of her back into his life. Not a hallucination exactly but the fantasy seems to be extremely intense and bordering on pathological. When Sherlock "sees" and talks to her too, I take that to mean he has deduced what's going on with John and simply accepted it in a spirit of "it's ok to not be ok". What does everyone else think?
    2 points
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